Royal Commission on Employment of Children in Factories: Supplementary Report (1834)

As part of the parliamentary inquiry which led to the 1833 Factory Act, the Royal Commission conducted a widespread investigation into the working conditions within mills and factories. At the request of the House of Commons, their findings were published in a two-volume report in 1834 which ran to over 1,100 pages.

Supplementary Report of the Central Board of His Majesty's his Majesty's Commissioners appointed to collect information in the manufacturing districts, as to the employment of children in factories, and as to the propriety and means of curtailing the hours of their labour.

The bulk of the report contains responses by manufacturers to set lists of questions regarding the nature of their business and the treatment of children employed. In the introduction, the report notes:

It appears that the manufacturers, with very few exceptions, do not consider the actual hours of work to be excessive or prejudicial to the health or well-being of the children. It could not, therefore, be expected of them that they should originate any scheme which should curtail those hours, if, from the nature of the work, such curtailment could not be effected without immediate trouble, inconvenience and expense.

Responses from Local Manufacturers

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Royal Commission on Employment of Children in Factories: Supplementary Report (1834)

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This page was last modified on 19 July 2016 and has been edited by Dave Pattern.

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