Ipswich Journal (02/Aug/1777)

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This page is part of the Holmfirth Flood Project and its content is believed to be in the Public Domain.
The following is a transcription of a historic newspaper article and may contain occasional errors. If the article was published prior to 1 June 1957, then the text is likely in the Public Domain.

Leeds, July 29. Wedneſday evening the heavieſt ſtorm of rain fell about ten miles above Huddersfield, and on the edge of Lancaſhire, ever remembered by any perſon living : it came with ſuch impetuoſity off the hills, that it roſe 4 yards in 15 minutes, and full ſeven yards higher than uſual. All the bridges, mills, houſes, and barns betwixt Marſden and Lockwood, near Huddersfield, within reach of the water, were ſwept down, as well as abundance of hay, and a great deal of corn, land and all, waſhed away. At Holmfirth 5 bodies were waſhed out of their graves, beſides much other damage, and 3 men, who had got upon a new bridge, were drowned. Several perſons alſo loſt their lives in attempting to ſave their hay, &c. and many more have loſt their all in the ſudden deluge. In ſhort, it is ſcarcely poſſible to enumerate the miſchief occaſioned by this dreadful water-fall, which ſome imagine to have been owing to the burſting of a cloud. It began to riſe about 8 o'clock, and the water was pretty well abated at midnight.


Leeds, July 29. Wednesday evening the heaviest storm of rain fell about ten miles above Huddersfield, and on the edge of Lancashire, ever remembered by any person living : it came with such impetuosity off the hills, that it rose 4 yards in 15 minutes, and full seven yards higher than usual. All the bridges, mills, houses, and barns betwixt Marsden and Lockwood, near Huddersfield, within reach of the water, were swept down, as well as abundance of hay, and a great deal of corn, land and all, washed away. At Holmfirth 5 bodies were washed out of their graves, besides much other damage, and 3 men, who had got upon a new bridge, were drowned. Several persons also lost their lives in attempting to save their hay, &c. and many more have lost their all in the sudden deluge. In short, it is scarcely possible to enumerate the mischief occasioned by this dreadful water-fall, which some imagine to have been owing to the bursting of a cloud. It began to rise about 8 o'clock, and the water was pretty well abated at midnight.