Huddersfield Daily Examiner (13/Nov/1918) - Doctor's Suicide

The following is a transcription of a historic newspaper article and may contain occasional errors. If the article was published prior to 1 June 1957, then the text is likely in the Public Domain.

DOCTOR'S SUICIDE.

TROUBLED BY WAR EXPERIENCES.

The coroner conducted an inquest at the Brough Police Court, thus afternoon, concerning the death of Dr. Daniel Stuart (35), Chapel Hill House, who was found dead in bed on Monday morning.

Nana Stuart, Chapel Hill House, said that her husband had been depressed tor some little time, and witness had been rather anxious about him. On Thursday morning last she found her husband in the surgery lying on the floor. Her brother found a bottle of chloral hydrate in his pocket. They thought that he had taken some of the chloral hydrate. They pulled him round, and he seemed normal on Friday, and said that he was ashamed of himself. He seemed very well on Sunday, when she last saw him between eleven and twelve at night. When she went into his room about 7:45 next morning her husband did not answer her, and she noticed a strong smell of gas. She noticed a tube connected with the gasjet and his mouth. The tube had been taken from witness's dental surgery, so that he must have got out of bed to get it during the night.

The Coroner: Had he had any trouble? Had he been out to France?

Witness said that he had served in Gallipoli — at Suvla Bay — and was one of the last two medical men to leave. He was not a surgeon, and the blood troubled him. He had grieved very much about what he had seen there.

Arthur James Donnoghuen Chapel Hill House, the brother-in-law of Dr. Stuart, said he made arrangements with Dr. Stuart's father to take the doctor for a cruise, and witness was to go to Liverpool on Monday to make final arrangements. Witness did not know why he should have taken his life.

The Coroner returned a verdict of "Death due to gas poisoning," and added that there did not seem any evidence as to the state of his mind. He said that it was very probable he had been troubled by his experiences at Gallipoli.