Huddersfield Chronicle (19/Jan/1856) - page 2

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2 BY THE. ene AND SOLD BY ALL . W PECTORAL CANDY, for the instant relief and speedy cure of coughs, colds, loss of voice, tightness of the chest, asthma, consumption, and all affections of the pulmonary organs, has receive the stamp of public approbation. This valu- [value- valuable] able medicine may be resorted to by persons of the most delicate constitution, as it does net affect the head or nfine [fine] the bowels. Extract from a le ter [te] addressel [addresses] by Mr. William Griffiths, Chemist, Abciayvon, [Abortion] Cardiganshire, to the Proprictor [Proprietor] ot Woolley's Pectoral Caudy, [Candy] dated April Sth, [St] 1835. JT have yreat [great] peasure [pleasure] ia informing you that your Woolley's Pectoral Candy is in yreat [great] vogue in this neigh- [neighbourhood] bourhood [boyhood] I introduced it at the end of last autumn, aud [and] recommended it to an elderly gentlemin [gentlemen] (whose name ive to you, and why what state), aved [ave] 4 years, who was couficed [sufficed] to his room with a bad cold and troubicsume [troublesome] cough, s that he had no rest at night ; the first few doses produced aw mde [me] ful [full] effet, [effect] he was able to sleep and, inashort [insert] time, wes [West] hhoarseness, [hoarseness] completely restored. 'This care lad suca [such] an effect upon . er the sale of your Carly here, that es-ry lot T had was, cleared out as soou [soon] as it came in. I sold one ventleman, [gentleman] last week, three 2-. YL. boxes and three Is. I3d, [Id] boxes. as he said he must ley iu a siock [stock] when he had the chance of (as a security to the public) her Majesty's Bhouourable [Honourable] Comiaissioners [Commissioners] of Stumps, have directed tuat [that] ithe [the] words Woolley's Pectoral be printed in white letters on the red ground of the Goverumeut [Government] Stamp round each box, without which nene [ene] is genuine. Prepared by Woolley, chem-st, Maidstone and sold by all chemists and medicine dealers throughout the world, in boxes at Is. 14d. and 2s. Yd. each, AGENTS IN Hubb RSFIELD.-MR. [Hebb FIELD.-MR] W. P. ENGLAND, Chemist, and MR. A. LEAROYD, Chemist. TRULY EFFICACIOUS AND MILD. DR. SCOTT'S BILIOUS AND LIVER PILLS. Prepared without any Mercurial ingredient, Srom [From] the recipe of Dr. Scott, of Bromley, Kent, ONDERFUL [WONDERFUL] restoration to good Health after four years' acute suffering from a disordered Jiver [Liver] and bad digestion. Extract of a letter from Mr. Simpson, of Richmond, Surrey - To Mr. W. Lambert, Chemist, 20, Jermyn-strveet, [German-street] Hay- [Haymarket] market, London. Sir,-It is with the greatest pleasure I make this com- [communication] munication, [communication] and inform you of the wonderful benefit I have derived by taking Scott's Bilious and Liver Pills, which have restored me to as sound a state of health as I when twenty years of age. I bave [ave] for the last four years been severely 'atilicted [afflicted] with a disordered liver, and indi- [India- indigestion] gestion [question] in its most obstinate furm; [farm] I have consulted many eminent medical men, and tried a uumber [number] of advertised remedies, without obtaining the least benefit. One medical man cousideied [costed] my case so hopeless, that he informed me T could not live long. I was so reduced in appearance and strenyth, [strength] that when I got uj in the morning I was, to use expression, almost lifeless; I had not the least energy of body or mind-unabie [mind-unable] to shave myself-or en- [engage] gage in the various duties of life, till half the day had passed away. In this dreadful state I continued for more than four years, and considered myself past recovery, and was compelled to abstain from malt liquor and very many articles of diet. A very old friend of mine, who had also expericnced [experienced] great benefit by taking the Pills, strongly advised me to them a trial, and I gratefully acknow- [acne- acknowledged] Jedye [Dye] the wonderful benefit I derived by taking a few doses, T aw now enabled to drink bottled stout, and to indulge in the luxuries of the table, having acquired quite a robust form, and ean [an] engage in the various duties and pleasures of life with comfort and cheerfulness. You are at perfect liberty to publish this communication; and I sincerely hope that all sufferers will hasten to recover the invaluable blesse [blessed] ing of health, by making trial of Dr. Scott's Bilious and Liver Pills, when they will soon be convinced of their wonderful efficacy. A most extraordinary cure of nervous headache of upwards of forty years' duration, by taking Dr. Scott's Bilious and Liver Pills - To Mr. W. Lambert, Chemist, 20, Jermyn-strveet, [German-street] Hay- [Haymarket] market, London. Sir, -Common justice and a fellow-feeling for those un- [unfortunate] fortunate individuals who are afflicted in a similar manner to what I have been myselt, [myself] induce me to address a few lines to you. lam now sixty-six years of age, and for the last forty years have not known the comfort of sound health, having been afflicted with a continued and excruci- [excuse- excruciating] ating [acting] nervous headache, that at times I have been almost bereft of my senses, A friend recommended me to try a box ot Dr. Scott's Bilious and Liver Pills had previously consulted the most eminent physicians, both here and in other parts of England and on the continent, but never obtained more than a temporary relief. From the strong representations of my friend I was induced to purchase a box of your pills the result far exceeded any expectation Tecould [Could] have formed, After takiny [taking] the contents of four boxes, I found myself completely restored to that health which I had so long been deprived of, and have since ex- [experienced] rieuced [reduced] no return. I should consider myself ungrateful if I did not acknowledge the benefits I have derived from your most excellent medicines, and I shall endeavour to make its superior qualities known and appreciated by a numerous circle of friends, You are at perfect liberty to publish this communication if you think it of any avail; and I sincerely hope that 'all similar sufferers will hasten to recover the invaluable blessing of health by using your medicine. W. F. Lownbes [Lowness] Srong. [Strong] Skelton Castle, Scarborough,-Yorkshire. Prepared only by W. Lambert, Chemist, 20, Jermyn- [German- demonstrate] street, Haymarket, London, in boxes, ls, 144., or three boxes in one, 2s, 9d.; and sold by all espectable respectable] medicine vendors throughout the United Kingdom. ImPoRTANT [Important] CavUTION..-Be [Caution..-Be] sure to ask for Dr. Scott's Bilious and Liver Piils. [Pills. If you ask for Scott's Pills, you will get quite a different medicine if you ask for Bilious and Liver Pills, you will get a spurious compound, which, if taken, will not have the beneficial effects. Take down the particulars,- Dr. Scott's Bilious and Liver Pills. The genuine are a square green package. lt frequently occurs that druggists impose on their cus- [us- customers] tomers [times] a Scott's Pill, inan [Inn] oval box, which is different medicine, and causes much disappointment, as heir medicinal effects are so opposite. Should any diffi. [diff] tulty [tumult] ovcur [over] in obtaining the pills, send sixteen postage ctamps [stamps] to the establishment-they will be sent free, IN THE HIGH COURT OF CHANCERY. TRIESEMAR. [MARIES] On the 29th of May, 1855, an Injunction was granted by the High Court of Chancery, and on the llth [loth] of June following was made perpetual, against Joseph Franklin and others, to restrain them, under a penalty of 1,000, from imitating this Medicine, which is protected by Royal Letters Patent of Eugland, [England] and secured by the seals of the Ecole de Pharmacie [Pharmacy] de Paris, and the Imperial College of Medicine, Vieuna. [Vienna] RLESMAR [RESUME] No. 1, is a remedy for relaxation, spermatorrheea, [Sumatra] and ali the distressing consequences arising from early abuse, &c., and its effects are efficacious in youth, manhood, and old age and to those persons who are prevented entering the married state from the results of early errors it is invaluable. TRIESEMAR, [MARIES] No. 2.-Effectually in the short space of three days, completely and entirely eradicates, all traces ot those disorders which capaivi [captive] and cubebs [Curbs] have so long been thought an antidote for, to the ruin of the health of a vast portior [portion] of the population. fRIESEMAR, [fries] No. 3.-Is the Great Remedy for that class of disorders, which unfortunately the English Physician treats with mercury to the inevitable destruction of the patient's constitutiun, [constitution] and which all the sarsaparilla in the world cannot remove. TRIESEMAR, [MARIES] No. 1, 2, and 3, are alike devoid of taste, er smell, and of all nauseating qualities. They may lay on the toilet table without their use being suspected. TRIESMAR, [Tries mar] Nos. 1, 2, and 38, are sold in tin cases price lis., [is] or four cases in one for 33s which saves 1ls.; [ls] and in 5 cases, whereby there is a saving of 1 12s. ; divided into separate doses, as administered by Valpeau, [Vale] Lallemand, [Almond] Roux, &c., &. To be had wholesale and retail in London of Johnson, 68, Cornhill; Hannay and Co., 63, Oxfurd-street; [Oxford-street] and Sanger, 150, Oxford-steet [Oxford-street] ; R. H. Ingham, druggist, 46, Market-street, Manchester ; H. Bradbury, bookseller, Deansgate, [Deans gate] Bolton J. Priestley, chemist, 52, Lord-street, Liverpool Powell, bookseller, 15, Westmoreland-street, Dublin Wiunall, [Will] bookseller, High- [Street] street, Birmingham Gell, chemist, King-street, Hudders- [Udders- Huddersfield] field Leyland, bookseller, Halifax; Pratt, chemist, Ive- [Negative] gate, and Remmington, chemist, Ivegate, [Negative] Bradford ; Heaton and Son, 7, Briggate, Leeds; Whitaker, book- [bookseller] seller, Sheffield; Pybus. Market-place, Barnsley; and through all medicine endors. vendors] RUPTURES. HITE'S [HIRE'S] MOC-MAIN [MIC-MAIN] patent lever TRUSS, requiring no steel spring roundthe [round the] body, is recom- [com- recommended] mended for the following peculiarities and advantages --- Ast, [At] facility of application; 2nd, perfect freedom from liability to chafe or excoriate 8rd, [ord] it may be worn with equal comfort in any position of the body by night or day ; it admits of every kind of exercise without the slightest in- [inconvenience] convenience to the wearer and is pertectly [perfectly] coucealed [concealed] from rvation. [ration] We do not hesitate to giveto [give] this invention our unqua- [unique- unqualified] lified [lived] approbation, and we strenuously advise the use of it to all those who stand in need of that protection which they cannot so fully, nor with the same comfort, obtain rom any other apparatus or truss as from that which we ve the highest satisfaction in th ing. - Church and Sate eae. [ear] NS Tecommending. [recommending] Recommen [Recommend] the following eminent Surgeons - Wn. Fergusson, Professor of Scigery [Surgery] in King's College, Surgeon to the King's College Hospital &e, C. G. Guthrie, Esq., Surgeon to the Royal Westmin. [Western] ster [ste] Opthalmic [Athletic] Hospital; W. Bowman, Esq, F R.S. Assistant,Surgeon to King's College Hospital T, Calla. wy, Senior Assistant-Surgeon to Guy's Hospital ; T. Blizard [Lizard] Curling, Esq., F.R.S., Surgeon to the London Hospital W. J. Fisher, Esq., Surgeon-in-Chief to the Metropolitan Police Force; Aston Key, Esq., Surgeon to Prince Albert Robert Liston, Esq., F.R.S.; James Luke, Esq. Surgeon to the London 'Truss Society Erasmus Wilson, Esq. F.R.S.; W. Coulson, Esq., Surgeon to Magdalen Hospital and many others. A descriptive circular may be had by post, and the Truss (which cannot fail to fit) can be forwarded by post, by send- [sending] Ing the circumference of the body two inches below the Nips to the Manufacturer, Mr. WHITE, 228, Piccadilly, ndon, [don] Price of a Single Truss, 16s., 21s., 26s, 6d., and 31s. 6d. ; tage, [age] ls. Price of Double Truss, 31s. 6d., 42s., and . 6d. 5 post 1s, 8d. Post-oifice [Post-office] Orders to be made payable to John White, Post-office, Piccadilly. LASTIC [LAST] STOCKINGS, KNEE CAPS, &.- The material of which these are made is recommended by the Faculty as being peculiarly elastic and compressi- [compress- Compressed] , and the best invention for giving efficient and per- [permanent] manent [mane] support in all cases of weakness and swelling ef the legs, varicose veins, sprains, &c. It is porous, light in texture, and inexpensive, and is drawn on like stocking. Price, from-7s. 6d. to 16s. each. imeus [ems] may be seen in the Crystal Palace. MANUFACTORY, 228, PICCADILLY, LONDON. THE HUDDERSFIELD CHRONICLK, [CHRONICLE] SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 1856. Read ye that run the awful truth, With which I ch my page ; A worm is in the bud of youth, And at the root of age. -Corrper. [age. -Cooper] DEBILITY AND NERVOUSNESS. Just published, New Edition, price 1s.; free bg post for 14 stamps. NE&votsS [NE&votes] DEBILITY a complete Essay on Spermatorrhea, [Sumatra] showing the advantages of the use uf [of] the Microscope in detezting [detecting] the causes which com- [commonly] monly [only] lead to its occurrence, the symptoms which in licate [delicate] its presence and the means to be ad pted [ad ted] furits [fruits] cure. By a Physician. This work, emanating from a qualified member of the medical profession, of many years experience, is addressed to these persous [persons] who sutfer [suffer] from the various diseases acquire-l in early life. Also, by the same author, price 1s.; free by post for 13 stamps, 'THE SCIENCE OF LIFE or, How to Insure Moral aud [and] Physical Llappiness, [Happiness] with rules for the pre servition [insertion] of Health and Strength, and precautionary hints fur the guidance of the weak, the nervous, the seden- [seen- sedentary] tary [Tar] and the delicate. Piper, Brothers, 23, Paternoster-row; Hannay, 43, Oxford-street, London; Raines and Co., York 5 Zurvaclough, [Barraclough] bookseller, Faryute, [Fryer] Sheffield and all book- [booksellers] sellers. Pitts THE GREATEST WONDER OF Movern [Govern] Tines.-Tuey [Tines.-They] correct pile, prevent flatulency, [flatulence] cleause [clause] the liver, purify the system, ren vate [ate] the debi- [Deb- debilitated] litated, [debilitated] strengthen the stomach, inerease [increase] the appetite, iuvigorate [invigorate] the nerves, promote health, and reinstaie [restrain] the weak to an ardour of never befure [before] experienced. The extraordinary daiiy [daily] sales of these invaluable pills, in ali parts of the globe, astonish everybody, convincing them that there is no other medicine in existence equal to Hollo- [Hollow- Holloway] way's Pills fur removing the complaints which are incidental to the human race. They are, indezd, [indeed] a blessing to the afflicted, and a bo wn to those who suffer from any disorder, internal or external. . ; Du Barry's delicious Revalenta [Prevalent] Arabica [Arabic] Food invariably restores health, without medicine, inconvenience, or expense, as it saves fifty times its cost in other removes indigestion, (dyspepsia), flatulency, [flatulence] constipation, nervous, bilious and liver complaints, cough, asthma, consumption and debility. We extract a few out of 50,000 testimonials of cures, which had resisted all medicines, Cure No. 4208. - Eight years' dyspepsia, nervousness, debility, with cramps, Spasms, and nausea, have been effectually removed by Du Barry's delicious food in a very short time.-Rev. John W. Flavell, Ridlington Rectory, Norfolk. From the Dowager Countess of Castlestuart.-Cure [Castles.-Cure] 52,612.- Rosstrevor, [Restorer] county of Down, Ireland, December 9, 1854.- The Dowager Countess of Castlestuart [Castles] feels induced, in the interest of suffering humanity, to state that Du Barry's excellent Revaleuta [Revealed] Arabica [Arabic] Food has cured her, after all medicines had failed, of indigestion, bile, great nervousness and irritability of many yearsstanding. [years standing] This food deserves the confidence of all sufferers and may be considered a blessing. Enquiries will be cheerfully answered.- [answered] In canisters, suitably packed for all climates, and with full instructions-1 lb. 2s. 9d.; 2lbs. [lbs] 4s. 6d.; 5lbs. [lbs] I1s.; [Is] 12ibs, [ribs] 22s.; [S's] super-retined, [super-retained] 1 lb. 6s.; 2lbs, [lbs] L1s.; [Ls] 5lbs. [lbs] 22s. [S's] 10lbs. [lbs] 33s. The 10lb. [lb] and 12lb. [lb] canisters are forwarded carriage free, on receipt of a post-office order. Barry, Du Barry and Co., 77, Regent-street, London; Fortnum, [Fortnight] Mason, and Co., purveyors to her Majesty, 182, Piccadilly. Agexts.-Huddersield-W. [Agents.-Huddersfield-W] P. England, J. Fell, G. Hall, C. Spivey, Isaac Fell, Charles Flockton; Bradford- [Bradford] John Pratt, W. J. Thomas, Thomas Milner, Maud and Wilson, J. B. Duckett, J. Sutcliffe, M. Rugerson, [Reason] F. Bennington, J. Sharp, W. 'I'. Onthwaite, [Linthwaite] T. H. Woodcock, W. Cocksholt, [Cockshott] J. Hick, S. Blamires, J. Morrell, J. Wad- [Waddington] dington [dungeon] Halifax-P. H. Wilkinson, J. H. Kershaw, W. Milner, Denton, H. Cawthorn, J. Jessop, R. Dawtry, B. Wood Stalybridge-H. Bagshaw; Wakefield-G. E. Smith, W. Coates, W. P. Lockwood, Joseph Mountain, W. Hick, R. Cottam, R. Marsden. SURPRISING CURES OF ASTHMA AND SPITTING OF BLoop.-Extract [Blood.-Extract] of a letter from Mr. Edwin Squire, book- [bookseller] seller, Eastgate, Louth, Lincolnshire, dated Sept. 20th, 1853 To Mr. William Lambert, chemist, 20, Haymarket, London.-Sir, your asthmatic balsam has beeri [beer] used in many instances in this town with astonishing effect. One of the cases to which refer was a person apparently on the borders of the grave; she had been afflicted for some years with asthma, attended with violent coughing, of breath, and very frequently spitting of blood, and was prevented from lying down for fear of suffucation. [suffocation] After giving up all hope of recovery, she was advised to try a bottle of Lambert's Asthmatic Balsam, which gave her immediate relief, and after she had taken a few bottles the dreadful disease quite disappeared, and her coustitution [constitution] is so renovated that she is now a wonder both to her neigh- [neighbours] bours [ours] and herself. In another case of a female, who seemed to be in the last stage of consumption, your balsam proved highly beneficial; the effect of a single bottle was almost like a miracle, and has now effected a perfect cure, and thus she has been rescued from that most distressing disease by your invaluable balsam. In consequence of these many wondertul [wonderful] cures, your asthmatic balsain [Balsam] is very highly and extensively recommended, and used effectually for the cure of coughs, colds, asthmas, [asthma] shortness of breath, spitting of blood, and consumption, and the demand, therefore, is very great. I know of many cases in addi- [add- addition] tion [ion] to the above, where perfect cures have been effected or asthmas, [asthma] &c., in their worst form. Those who are sub- [subject] ject [jet] to or suffering from bronchitis should immediately take a few doses of this wonderful medicine. Prepared only and sold by W. Lambert, chemist, 20, Jermyn-street, [German-street] Hay- [Haymarket] market, London, iu bottles at Is. 1 d., 2s. 3d., and 4s. 6d. Be particular to ask tor Asthmatic Balsam, and do not be persuaded to take any other medicine. Sold also by most chemists and booksellers. Tue Late oF MURDER aT PaDDINGTON.- [Paddington.- Paddington] About four months ago a man named Henry Watts, the keeper of a beershop [beer shop] in Praed-street, Paddington, was committed by the sitting magistrate, Mr. Long, from the police-court, Marylebone, on the charge ofhaving [of having] murdered his wife. He was tried, and, being found guilty of man- [manslaughter] slaughter, was sentenced to transportation for 14 years. Subsequently to the trial the principal witness against the accused-Sarah Borwning-was [Browning-was] tried for perjury in a case which had been preferred by her against the father of Henry Watts for an alleged violent and unprovoked assault upon ber. [be] Mr. Handley, managing clerk to Mr. Foley, solicitor, Welbeck-street, and who had conducted the defence, used his utmost exertions to obtain a commuta- [commit- commutation] tion [ion] of the sentence passed by memorialising the Secretary of State for the Home Department, setting furth [Firth] in as strong and as powerful a manner.as possible that Watt's convic- [convict- conviction] tion [ion] took place entirely upon the strength of the statement of the woman Browning, who had been proved by ulterior proceedings to be almost, if not entirely, unworthy of belie . On Saturday Mr. Foley received an official notification from the Home-office to the effect that Sir George Grey had taken all the circumstances of the case into consideration, and that Watt's sentence was commuted from 14 years' transportation to two years' imprisonment, the said term of incarceration to commence from the period of his trial and conviction in September last. THE EDINBURGH ADDRESSES TO THE KING OF SARDINIA. -The [the] answer of the Sardiuian [Sardinian] ambassador to the address of the 'inhabitants' of Edinburgh to the Sardinian Monarch was the subject of discussion at the meeting of the Town Council there on Wednesday, and the address itself repudiated in somewhat strong terms. Dr. Renton said that, after the address which had been agreed to unani- [unanimously] mously [Mosley] at a meeting of the corporation, specially called for the purpase-an [purpose-an] address, which, he believed, fairly represented the feelings of the inhabitants of the city-it might be thought that no further demonstration was neces- [NeWS- necessary] sary [say] to testify to the high admiration whica [which] they all enter- [entertained] tained [gained] for the King of Sardinia. Another demonstration, however, took place, of which he would merely say, that he would leave the authors of the address there adopted to the operation of the very instructive admonition which the King of Sardinia had given to them, trusting that it would not be lost on a party the sectarian antipathies of which had led them arrogantly and erroneously to give forth their views as an embodiment of the public opinion of Mdin- [Min- Edinburgh] burgh. (Hear, hear, and applause. -The [applause. -the] Lord Provost said, that he believed that the address which he had been instructed to draw up, and which had been unani- [unanimously] mously [Mosley] approved by the corporation, truly expressed the sentiments of the great body of the community, and he was glad that so gratifying an answer had been received to it With regird [regard] to the other address, he mivht [might] be allowed to say that, when asked by a minister of the established church to preside at the meeting, he had agreed to do so, considering the object to be one that coincided with the general sentiments ofthe [of the] public It was no doubt his duty to bave [ave] perused with care and anxious consideration the address which was to be proposed. Owing to the pressure of business, in connection with lvcal [local] parliamentary measures and other matters, and amid the preparations for going off to London, he had not been able to do so, and he weut [West] to the meeting unprepared for what occurred. He must say that, had he observed, when the address was real, that it contained anything which could have called forth the answer which had been given to it, he certainly would not have conveyed it to the quarter he did. (Hear, hear.) Assuredly this occurrence would be a lesson to him in future to exercise mure [more] caution in such a matter. The subject then dropped.-At the United Industrial School meeting, on Monday, Lord Neaves, one of the judges of the Court of Session, reterred [referred] to the King of Sardinia' answer, while speaking of the subject of toleration. He said that some of those who most needed it had lately received, from a qua ter [te] of their own selection, a lecture on this subject which he hoped would bo of pre-eminent service to them. (Applause. . ALARMING FrrE [Free] IN PREsTON.-On [Preston.-On] Monday morning, about half past eight o'clock, an alarming fire broke out in the scutching room of Mr. Seel's cotton mill, in Derby- [Derby street] street, Preston. The fire engines were quickly upon the spot, but as the room in which the fire was burning is upon the basement storey, or cellar, the utmost difficulty was experienced in finding the exact spot where the materials were being consumed. One of the engines was therefore stationed in front of the building, and another sent round to the rear; and whilst the men in charge of the first took out two or three of the windows and playe t [plate t] at random into the room, the men in charze [charge] of the other found operations almest [almost] completely prevented by a high wall erected within a yard of the building. One of the men, however, having scaled this wall, and descended to the mi'l side of it with a jet in his hand, found that the fire was most intense in the southern corner on the western side of the room, and imme- [Mme- immediately] diately [lately] all efforts were of course directed upon this point. in the course of haltan [halt] hour the firemen by great exertions were enabled, notwithstanding they had to encounter im- [in- immense] mense [sense] volumes of smoke, to begin removing the cotton, of which there was a very large stock in the ruom. [room] After saturating it with water, it was carried to Mr. Haslam's timber yard, in which there was but little wood, on the opposite side of the street, and there spread out; and the firemen, thinking all dange [danger was over, left the premises about ten o'clock. But, in theirabsence, [their absence] one of the factory hands incautiously conveyed a skip of cotton from the scutch- [scutching] ing room to the timber yard, without having taken the precaution of saturating it and when it was emptied upon the other, it was seen to bea massof [massive] fire. 'his instantly communicated to the rest, and there was again great danger that the whole would be conxumed. [consumed] 'The [the] engines were aguin [again] fetched, and again the flames were subdued. The scutching frames and Mr. Seed's mill are almost entirely constructed of iron, or it is probable that they would have been very seriously injured, if not quite con- [consumed] sumed, [sued] The building, which is fire-prvof, [fire-proof] is insured; but we have been inforined [informed] that the stock is not, and.that Mr. Seed's loss will be at least 300. Considerable damage was done to the woodwork in the scutching room, and to the windows. Nothing is kuown [known] of the origin of the fire. WAY TI RAIL (CORRECTED FOR ME TABLES. Janvaky, [Canvas] 1856.) LONDON AND NORTH WESTERN. (MANCHESTER, HUDDERSFIELD, LEEDS, &c.) 7 WEEK DAYS. SUNDAYS. TATIONS. [STATIONS] . 1 2,8,4,5,6,7,8,)9 1 2 3 4 London 0,845) SB es 915) .. 8 O12 [O] 0 5 0) 80 8 Birming [Birmingham] bad) ........- ee 10 55)... 8 40 10 3012 0 .. 245)5 6) 7 30)T1 15) 1 45). 4) 185 2.) 2. 7 25 10 50, 110,210) .. 5) 7 20, 9 35) 135 2.0 5 6) OTE [OT] suns 12 50 2 32 6 20 8 40 11 a 3 20 2 ig 6 40 40 10 25 2 32 7 30, 6 2u 63s Liv [Li] ee 9 50 12 30 wee os wee ane [an] 25 jj biverpoo [Liverpool] we 6 30 I La 6 ae 1 in Par. SCL [CL 2Cl. [cl. 20113 a 2 ci. 2Cl [cl] Bx. su 2 Cl. Parl. [Park. Parl. [Park] Parl, [Park] MANCHESTER............departure) 6 20 8 50 11 50 .. 2 20 3 45) 5 441 7 0) 8 45 7 50 Gh ASHEON [ASHTON] 6 40 9 5112 10 2 40 4 5) .. 16 0) 7 20 9 Lo 8 15 9 Ie 8 STAL-YBRIDGE [SLAT-BRIDGE] 6 43 9 10 12 20) .. 2 45 4 10) ee 6 3 a 25 9 1s 8 6 45) 9 la 10 Mossley........... 6 55 58; .. 3 4 19) 6 13) 7 32) 9 22) 2s 6 52,9 22 122 7 2 9 25112 35) .. 13 7) .. 620 7 os 9 29 8 35 7 0) 9 29) 133 Delph ees [see] een [en] one mercies wee we ee eee [see] . oe ru Be ase [as] sf on a arrival... 2 ees [see] we ee e soe) [se] FB) wee ee oe 182 Saddleworth 7 8 93012 3.12) 4 30, .. 6 25) 7 45) 9 35 39 7 5) 9 35 14 Diggle 714 9 35 12 45 3.17 435) .. 6 30) 7 52) 9 42 451 710, 9 40 233 Marsden 7 24 9 'elie [eli] 55). 3 25 442) 2. 1 6 40 8 il 9 52 8 55 720 9 50 Slaithwaite wo. lesen [lessen] 7 31 9 50 1 0) 1, 3 Bul [Bull] 450, .. .. 8 8 9 58 2) 7 28) 9 5s Golear [Golcar] 7 36 5) w. 3 od .. 8 13.10 4 6 78410 4 24 Longwood oo. 7 4 .. Lio [Oil 340) 458). 9) 911 gee ae 253 HUDDERSFIELD...........--... 748) 9 5,120) .. 3.45) 5 5). 7 0) 8 25 20 15 11 25) 9 20 11 0) 7 15 23s ses [se] 7 08 913 ... 2 28... 358, 5 12) .. 5 31.10 22 9 2811 8&7 S310 [S] 22 204 Heston wi ol aaa) 43 35. tO wee 835) oe 9 82111 12) 7 57 10 zs 3U MIRFIELD 000... 8 4 9 21 10 IS 1 40 4 5,5 2 7 12) 8 40 10 27 9 37 11 17, S 2 10 30 34 Dewsbury 8 12) 9 30 10 26) 1 50, 415 5 28) .. 7 20) 8 48 10 37 9 47 11 25' 8 10 10 40 Batley on 27 9 84 10 91) 1 55, 20 5 35 353 10 42) 9 52 11 80 8 15 10 45 al aay [say] 9 aol 28 43 34 730 9 ol10 [ola] 50 (110 2 11 40 25l10 [L] 55 374 Morley ... 8 27 9 42'10 40, 2 5)... 43 5 45 3 5 (jt 2132 40) 25) 5 29, Churwell [Howell] ... 8 32 947) ... 210 433 5 50 9 5 7 7 5 41 8 87 9 52 10 45 2 15 440.5 53 .. 9 10 11 50, 8 v5.11 5 494 -Leeps. [Lees] Wellington Station, arr. 8 45 10 0 10 52) 2 .. 4.50' 6 o .. 7 45) 9 20,11 10 16 22,12 45 11 15 Arthington 0.0.15 'll 27 528) 8 6 43, ll 55 5 55, 8 29 6 8 York see eee [see] ' 12 45 6 50 9 20 7 3 50 10 15 ee Oe No. 9 Train is Ist [Its] Class Express from Liverpool. Class between Diggle and Stations intermediate to Leeds. No. 10 Down Train will consist of Ist, [Its] 2nd, and 3rd Class between Manchester, Huddersfield, and Stations intermediate; and Ist [Its] and 2nd Class between Huddersfield and Leeds. No. 12 Down Train will call at Stalybridge, Huddersfield, and Stations intermediate, to set down Passengers from the South only, aud [and] i1 Down Trains consist of Ist, [Its] 2nd, and 3rd Class between Manchester, Diggle, and Stations intermediate; and Ist [Its] and 2nd Nos. 7 LONDON AND NORTH WESTERN. (LEEDS, HUDGERSFIELD, [HUDDERSFIELD] MANCHESTER, &c.) S25 [S] 3, WEEK DAYS. SUNDAYS. 3 STATIONS. . 53154), 1; 2 6,7) 8 9 10) 1 2,3 4 Tae [Tea] NEWCABEIE [NEWCASTLE] 2.00. 5 8 20 li 15 1 20) 6 7 . 75510 45 210 3 20 9 615 'Ripon ... 8 23,10 59 2 33 3 9 25 6 45 S TT 8 0 8 55 11 30 255 5 30 9 538 715 wee nee 20. Par. 2C1. [C. Ex. 2 Cl. 2C1 [C Ex. 2Ci. [ci. 3C1.'2 [C.'2] Cl.'2 Ci Parl.'Parl. Parl Park.'Park. Park] Pari. [Paris] ... 9253 LEEDs, [Leeds] Wellington Station ........dep [de 5 50 7 20) 9 20 11 0 12 39 3.15) 4 0 6 0) 7 20 7 0) 1 0 6459 557) 7 27 ... (11 7 12 37 ... 4 8) 6 s 737 7 81 716539 7 3 2213 Churwell [Howell] 6 3) 7 32)... 12 12 42)... 4 14 6 14) 7 43 714 112) 6 59) 9 18 5 6 7 7 37 9 17 12 47 3 27) 4 19) 6 19 7 48) 720'117'7 5 918 8 2163 Batley ........ 6 17 7 46) 9 45 21 25 12 56 3 35 4 28 6 28 7 7 29, 1 27 713, 9 26 9 6 22) 7 50) 9 50 11 3u) 1 3 40) 4 34 6 34, 8 2) 7 33 1 32) 71S [1ST] 9 39 12. 2193 MIRFIELD 2... 6 30) 7 58 10 38) 1 10) 3 50) 4 42 6 43) 8 13 7 43) 1 42) 7 26) 9 40 13 9113, Heaton 635) ... ee 11 42) 115)... 4.47) 6 48), 748 147) 731 9 45 14 (2103); 6 40) 8 8)... 11 46) 1 19)... 4 52 6 53 8 20 753 1 52' 7 36 9 Su 162 908 HUDDERSFIELD 6 50 8 18 10 15 11 55) 130) 4 5 0) 7 8 3011 12) 8 2 2 074510 laggs [largs Longwood 6 56) 8 26 lz 4 136) ..)5 8 38 8 8 2 8 7 53) Golcar 7 0 8 BL 12 9 140 ... 513 8 43 813 213) 7 58) 914.2034), Slaithwaite cesses [ceases] cesses [ceases] 7 6 36) ... 112 14) 145) 2. .. 8 48 g 20 218 8 3) 233.201 Marsden 7 15) 8 42(10 32 12 20; 1 55) 4 5 24) 55 8 26 225 810 OT 7 25 8 12 30 2 5 ... 534) 2 9 5 8 36) 235, 8 20 283196 Saddleworth (Uppermill) [Upper mill] ............ 7 30 8 55 10 45 12 35, 210 ... 5 40) ... 9 10 8 41) 240 8 25 Delph 10. 6 50) ... 10 .. Sua [Sea] 517) . ase [as] ae oes [ors] arrival...) 750)... 13 20) .. 2.15 52). woe e oes [ors] 292 195 Greenfield 7 8S 9 0; 4. 1240) 215) 1.1545) -. 9 15 8 46 2 45 8 3u 82 1933) Mossley 7 45 9 7 w 12 47 2 22) 2. 5 52) .. 9 22 8 54, 2 53 8 38 STALYBRIDGE 7 55 9 14 11 012 55 2 30 2) .. 9 32 9 4.3 8 45 431 26) 9 8 11 30 135) 3 5) 5 25 6 30 .. 110 0.19 BH 9 35 3 25 9 15) B37 [B] ASHTON 8 0 9 19 11 5,1 0 2 35) 45816 7 .. 9 37 910 .. 8 50 423 188 MANCHESTER, Victoria Station......arr 8 30 9 46 11 25, 1 25) 3 0, 518) 6 27) .. 9 55 9 os 9 15 75 Q01 Q] Liverpool, Lime-street.........---arrival 10 20 12 5)12 40' 3 25) 5 0) 6 30) 30 do wl wel [well] ze ie Crewe 9 55 10 35 12 45 3 5 4 53 615) .. ... 1045 0. 1224 1784 Birmingham 2 oj12 [oj] 59 34016 5) .. 2 6 120) 6 22531124 London........... .. 6 80 8 45) 7 30 10 15 9 15 10 45 4 30 6 15 14 30 are Ordinary 1st and 2nd Class between Leeds and Hucdersfield [Huddersfield] Class between Diggleand [Diggle] Manchester No. 9 Up Train will cons' chester, and 1st and 2n1 [n] Classes between Leeds and Longwood. Leeds and Diggle, and Stations intermediate, and Ist [Its] and 2nd on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays only. The 9 20a.m [a.m] Up Train will call at Mossley and Greenfield op Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. Nos. 3 and 6 Up Trains No. 6 Train will call at Saddleworth on Tuesdays. No 7 is 3rd ist [its] of Ist, [Its] 2nd, and 3rd Classes between Longwood and Man- [Mann] No 5 Up Train consists of Ist, [Its] 2nd, and 3rd Classes between Classes only between Diggle and Manchester. No. Train runs LANCASHIRE AND YORKSHIRE. (LEEDS, HUDDERSFIELD, MANCHESTER. &c.) . WEEK DAYS. SUNDAYS STATIONS. 5 2) 3 4 6 7 8 9,10) 1 2 3, 4, 5 Edinburgh we owe ee 950) .. 2 315 55 we ) Noweastle [Newcastle] ase [as] 5 0 8 20 1 20) os 7 8 ll 6 oon [on] Hull .... 6 7) 8 45 10 50 2 35 5 45) 8 6 45 Searbrorongh [Headstrong] --- 6 30) 9 40 215) .. wee Harrogate. 9 10 8 45 2 30 6 20 wee wee York 7 15) 9 35 11 50 3 55) 6 50 9 38) 2 10 7 50 Par, 2 Cl. 2 Cl. Mail. 3 Cl. 2 Cl 2 Cl 2C1. C] Mail. Parl. Parl Mail. Park. Park] Mail. Parl. [Park] Mail Normanton 5 20 9 5 110) 310) 5 5 151040) 6 oO) ... 11 5) 6 30) 8 14 Barnsley see 7 40) 10) 940) ... 240) .. 545) ... oe 840) 5 Wakefield 5 30 8 20 9 8 11 15 1 19 3 20 5 13; 25 10 50 6 10)... 11 15 6 40) 8 25 FLOrDUry [Florry] 5 40 -. 9 18 11 25 ... 2 30 5 21 8 35 .. 6 20 11 25 6 51) 8 35 Thornhill for Dewsbury 5 50 -. 9 24 11 32 1 30 3 36) 5 30; 8 44 11 4 6 99) ... 111 32) 7 2 8 44 Mirfield... 0.0 [0] OFTival) [Festival] 6 5 8 36) 9 32 11 45 1 42) 3 44) 5 42) 8 lo 6 36 7 57 11 45 7 8 8 54 RSFIELD... [FIELD] conser [cones] ees [see] sae --- ---- - - HUBDE [HUBERT] ival.... [oval.... 6 50 8 48 1215) 155; 4 616 0)9 5) 2. 6 49) 8 11 12 15 7 25; 9 5 departure 5 50 8 25) 9 11 30 1 26) 2 53 5 15, 8 55 7 40 11 30) 6 45, 8 40 i 6 15 we 146) CL ow. 859) 1 6 4118 5) 1. 714) 8 59 elimi [elm] 6 23 8 44) 9 44 12 0 1 53 3 56) 5 51, 9 6 11 20)' 6 51) 8 11 112 01 7 2119 6 Elland. 6 32 -- .. 2 444 4 6 2. 117 6 8 20) 2. 731 912 North Dean ...........000 6 39 8 50 ... 218) 4 9 1917 wi 7 7 S 25) 1. 1735) 917 Sowerby Bridge.... 6 50 9 0110 5 12 20) 2 24 4 20) 6 14; 9 27 11 43) 7 16) 8 33 12 20 7 43) 9 27 sivas [siva] 6 50 910 10 7 12 27 2 46, 4 18, 6 14, 9 27... 7 25) 8 45 12 35) 8 0 9 37 Luddenden Foot... 6 58 9 5 ... 112 25 2 32) 4 25) 6 19) 9 33)... 8 39 12 25 7 49) 9 33 Mytholmroyd 77 910 .. .. 237 431) .. 844) ... 7 54 9 38 Hebden Bridge 715 915; ... 12 34) 2 43) 4 36) 6 29) 9 43)... 8 49112 34 7 59 9 43 Todmorden 35 9 29,10 24 12 47 3 C 4 46; 6 47 9 57 12 8 9 9 12 47) 8 20) 9 57 Burnley see 8 15 10 0 11 35 1 20) 3 30 5 11 742) oo. 9 40) 1 20; 910) .. departure) 7 5 9 6 ... 12 0) 1 20) 3 40) 6 0) os ih 8 30)10 45 745 ... Littleborough 8 oT 945 .. 1 6) 317)5 3 7 01013) 1. 9 29 1 6 8 39 10 13 Rochdale 8 15 9 54;10 45) 1 15) 3 25) 5 12) 7 7.10 21 12 28, 9 39 1 16) 8 49 10 20 departure 8 20 9 5810 48 1 20) 3 30) 5 15) 7 10'16 23 12 35 43 1 21 8 53 10 23 Blue Pits... 8-25 10 5 10 52 1 27) 3 35) 5 22) 7 14.10 28 12 45 9 49) 1 27) 9 0 10 28 Middleton........ 8 35 j11 [J] 0 1 37 3 46) 5 30 7 24 10 36) 9 57 1 36 9 10 10 36 20. cesses [ceases] ce scecneees [scenes] 8 55 -. 111 35 2 35) 4 35) 7 20 7 57 10 55)... 10 37 2. 5) 9 33 10 55 Manchester 9 3 10 7 15) 2 0) 4 5) 5 52 50; 1 10 10 18 2 0) 9 30 1 50 Passengers for Halifax by Nos. 4 and 5 Trains change carriages 3 Train is 3rd Class from Rochdale to Manchester. at Brighouse, 7 and 9 at North Dean, and No. 8, at Elland. No Oe LANCASHIRE AND YORKSHIRE. (MANCHESTER, HUDDERSFIELD, LEEDS, &c.) WEEK DAYS. SUNDAYS. TATIONS. [STATIONS] 8 1)2,8),4)5)6,7)8)9)10 1,2,38)4 Par. 2 Cl. Mail. 2 C1. 2 G1 2 Gl. 2 C2 Gi. Parl. Mail. [Park. Mail] Park Pari Paris] 6 30) 40 10 15 12 45 30 5 0 6 15 8 7 451015 5 of 745 6 50 8 58110 2 1 5 8 17 5 11 6 26; 7 45 10 22, 5 191 8 3 6 15 8 35 10 15 12 36 2 50 4 20) 6 0) 7 30 8 3 10 0) 4 50 7 45 7 0 9 8 10 40) 2 37 30 5 22 6 40 8 33 8 15'10 40' 5 30 8 15 7 8 9 46 1 23 3 36) 5 27; 6 45 8 38 8 20'1u 46) 5 35 8 20 7 12 9 15 10 50 1 97 3 40 5 30 6 47 8 40 8 24 10 50 5 39 8 25 Littleborough ace 728 x. (10 571 1 36 8 49 5 38, 6 54) 8 46) 8 32110 57 5 47 8 35 1... 5 40) 7 43) 9 29 11 13 2 52 4 8155 7 9 9 2) 8 47 11 9) 6 5) 8 50 Burnley OTival [Oval] 4. 615 10 0) ... 215 525) ... 742) ... ... 9 30 departure ... 7 5 9 0 10 25) 1 29 840 ... .. 8151945) 7 45 Hebden Bridge 52, 7 58; 9 8611 231 2 7 4 90) 5 59) 7 20) 9 3S 19 62119 8 Mytholmroyd eee [see] 212 495 .. 724 921 9 5 2. 162519 Luddenden Foot ......... 6 2'8 9) ... 111 39 217 432 ... 7 28) 9 25, 9 1011 28 6 29 9 13 Sowerby Bridge ............ 6 16; 8 19, 9 48 11 40 2 27 4 45 6 12, 7 40 9 9 20 11 33 6 38) 9 93 Halifax 6 24) 8 15 9 35,11 298 2 39 4 45 5 5G 7 42 9 12 1 9 5 11 25 6 20 9 12 . 629)8 27) 1.) .. 235 453 .. 746) ... 645 9 35 6 33 832) ... 2. 239 5 0) ... 7 5019 42 1933) 6 48 9 49 6 40) 8 89) 9 57,11 50 6 46 5 8) 6 20' 7 56 9 5 9 41 11 50 6 3sl [sal] 9 50 Cooper Bridge 646 846) 253, 516 .. 8 8 9 56 1 948 7 4) 9 5s HUDDERSFIELD............ -- arrival.... 7 0) 9 15 10 2012 15 2 57 6 .. 9 5 20 10 12 15) 7 25 10 20 departure 6 35 8 25 9 55)11 30 2 53 5.15 755 285 9 40 11 30, 6 45, 9 40 Mirfield w- 650 85410 4 12 0 3 5 5 30 6 30 8 14110 9 55 19 0) 715110 5 Thornhill for Dewsbury 656)9 8) ... 12 10) 314 540 .. 4 12 9 7 96 10 16 Horbury 17 69 11 w. 12 21 8 24 5 50 .. 8 31 10 25 10 14 12 19 7 35 10 95 Wakefield 715 9 20 10 20 12 30 3 33 6 0 6 48) 8 41 10 34 10 25 12 7 45 10 32 Barnsley ... '11 15 11 15 2 20) 5 15 vee [see] oo) 9 25) a 110 15 8 Normanton ee a 7 25) 9 30 10 30 12 40) 3 45) 6 10 6 58) 8 5u 10 45) 10 35 12 40; 7 40 YOrk [York] 8 5011 5 210 5 80 8 30 10 40 7 40 Harrogate at 11 45 59 s aa 8 50 we Searburo' [Sabre] say van he 4 ese a9 ows [ow] Hall eee [see] DUI s 40 155 310 8 30 9 30 11 40 8 40 toes sees 30 3 50 455 1015 .. . Edinburgh 8 35 8 8 20 we ae jmrn. [Moran] and intermediate Stations to Rochdale. No 3 Train stops at Luddenden Foot on Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. No. 10 Trainis [Trains] Parliameutary [Parliamentary] from Manchester HUDDERSFIELD TO HOLMFIRTH AND PENISTONE. STATIONS. WEEK DAYS. SUNDAYS. 8OL [IL 2CLj2d [clad] Cl 24CL [CL] 2d Cl, 2 Cl) 2 Cl) SCL) [CL] BCI [BI] CL 3 C130, [C] 3G. Hnddersfield [Huddersfield] ...,....departure 6 55) 7 5 8 15, 9 20,10 25,12 25) 2 0) 2 30) 4 5 4 30'7 oll [ll] 6 49 7 10 10 15 5 10 7 30 Lock WO0d [Wood] 7 Of 7 10 9 25,10 29 12 32) 2 5) 2 34 410 4 34 7 5 6 54 7 15)10 20 5 15 7 35 Berry BroW [Brow] 7 3) 7 18 10 35 12 35 2 9 2 38) 4 14 4 38) 7 91 6 58 7 2ul10 [ul] 25) 5 20 7 40 Honley 7 7 717 8 25 9 31 10 37 12 89 2 2 43) 4 18) 4 43) 7 14 7 2 7 25 10 30) 5 25 7 45 Brockholes Junction ............ 7 11 7 20 8 30; 9 35 10 41 12 43 2 15 2 47) 4 22) 4 48 7 7 5 7 30 10 35) 5 30 7 50 cscs [casks] 724) 834, (10 45 12 47 2 19 423, 72217 of iu 38) 7 53 Holmfirth arTival [arrival] 7 27 8 37, 10 48)12 50 2 22 4 32 7 7 12 lo 42 7 55 departure 8 45 2 30 4 40 715 8 48 2 33 4 44 718 Brockholes Junction .. ......... 711 9 35 2 47 4 48 7 30 5 30 Stocks MOor [Moor] 7 16 9 40 2 53) 4 53 7 36 5 36 Shepley 7 20 9 44 2 57) 457 7 38 5 38) Denby Dale 7 27 9 51 3.3 5 5 7 46 5 45 Penistone ix SUE 86 10 1 3 13 5 14 7 55 5 55 arrival) 8 26 10 40 4 3 5 45 8 30 6 30 PENISTONE TO HOLMFIRTH AND HUDDERSFIELD. STATIONS. WEEE [WERE] DAYS. I SUNDAYS. 3C1. [C. 3dC, [3d] 2 Cl, Cl) 2CL) [CL] 2CL. [CL. Ci; 3Cl. [cl] 3C1,3C., [C,3C] 3 G1 Sheffield ...............departure 6 12 30 2 36 545 9 45 PenistoMe [Penistone] 7 49 17 3 20 6 30 9 38 719 Denby Dale ...... 7 59 117 8 32 6 40 9 45 7 8 6 1 24 8 38 6 47 9 55 7 37 Stocks Moor .......... 8 10 1 27 3 42 6 50 9 5S 7 40) 8 16 1 33 8 48 6 56 10 5 7 46 34 2 19 433 7 22 19 53 7 53 8 387 2 22 4 36 7 25 10 55 7 55) eparture [departure 7 80 45 11 011 2 30 4 38 7 30), 715 ll 6 li Thongsbridge........... 7 SS 48 11 8 1 3 2 33 4 42 7 33 7 18 ll 8 13 7 36 815 8 51 11 6) 1 6) 1 3) 2 36) 48) 4 46) 6 56) 7 36) 7 21 10 5111 10 7 46) 8 16 7 39 19 11 91 9 2 39) 3 52) 4 50) 7 0 740 7 24 10 911 14 7 19 7 43 8 23 11 13) 113 2 42) 3 57) 4 54, 7 5 7 43' 7 28 10 13 11 18 7 53 8 28 LOCK WOO 7 48 8 27; 11.18 117 141 246) 4 11459) 7 9) 7 47 7 33 10 17 11 23 7 59 3s Huddersfield ...............arrival 7 55 32 9 0 11 25 1 93 145) 2.49 4 5 5 51 713 7 53 7 38 10 21111 301 8 3 8 33 ' Third Class to and from Thongsbridge and Holmfirth. By the 2 6 train from Sheffield, passengers are booked 8rd [ord] class to Mirfield and stations beyond. HUDDERSFIELD TO BRADFORD 1 BRADFORD TO HUDDERSFIELD. SOLE Ch SCL [CL] 2 CL 2 CL) 2 CLS [CL] 2 Cl.) 2 CL) 2 CL SCL [CL] VOC [VON] Sa sansa [Santa] Manchester ... 6 80, 8 40,1015 11245) 3 615 ... Bradford... 615) 8 5 9 35 11 15) 115) 2 35 Is 7 401 9 35 Huddersfld [Huddersfield 6 35 9 9 55 11 80) 1 26 2 53) 5 15 7 55) 9 55 Low Moor.. 6 23 8.12) 9 43 11 22) 1 921242 '5 7 481 9 44 Mirfield ... 6 45) 9 1010 8 12 10) 1 47) 48 5 45) 56 10 12 Cleckheatn [12 Cleckheaton 6 29 8 19) 9 50 i) 29) 1 28) 2 49 (5 13) 7 55 9 59 Hecmndke [Heckmondwike] 9 15 10 14 12 17 1 54) 8 56, 5 52) 9 3 ... ILiversedge Liversedge] 6 34) 8 23) 9 54 1 34 1 32) 2 51 5 17) 7 59 9 54 Liversedge 9 20 10 18 12 23 2 4) --, 5 56,9 7 ... Hekmdwk Hemmed] 6 39 8 27 9 58 11 38 1 35) 2 57 5 92's 9 59 Cleckheatn [Cleckheaton] 9 24,10 22 12 27; 210) 4 2 6 2 913) ... Mirfield ... 6 46) 8 34 10 5 11 45) 1 42. 3 48 5 29 8 12110 5 Low Moor 31 10 80,12 4) 217 4 9,6 9 919 ... lHuddersfid Huddersfield 7 0 8 48 10 20112 15 1 54 4 0 6 9 5 10 23 Bradford ... 9 age 2 27) 4 a 617 9 26 ... Manchester; ... 10 30) ... 2 0 4 S 5 52 7 aso [so] 50 Trains leave Huddersfield for Bradford and intermediate Stations on Sundays, at 7 40. 952. 1180. 645 9 40, also from Bradford to Huddersfield and intermediate Stations at 7 20. 11 15. 6 5. and 8 15. AK HUDDERSFIELD TO HALIFAX. HALIFAX TO HUDDERSFIELD. 2 Ci 2 CL.) 2ClLj [call] 2 Clea, [Clear] 2h 1 9 30 12 0 8 45 8 BO). Halifax... 8 20 11 26 2 30 4 45 7 4a 7c. 0... 9 43 12 10 8 BB 9 0 .. North Dean 8 27 11 33 2 24) 4 51) 7 46, a 49 12 17 4 2 6 6 9 6) Bland. 8 BOf1 [Bf] 37 237)... 7 4gl [gil] 7S 9 53 12 21) 4 6) 6 9 910) .. Brighouse o.oo. 8 361 45 2 431 7 55h [H] 10 12 27 4 18 6 14) 9 Huddersfield... 00.000 8 Se 2 57 Blt. [Belt] Le NP PARADA [PARADE] er Wome [Some] and fForeian [foreign] - Friday night last, the shop of Mr. Jonas Bairstow, butcher, Queonshead, [quenched] near Halifax, was entered, and a tity [tit] of meat stolen. The subscriptions towards a monument to the memory of the late Jovionieery, [Joinery] in Ireland, amount to er more than 2,000. . Greeks are in 'possession of about two thirds of the land within the walls of Jerusalem, generally supposed to have been bought with Russsian [Russian] money. Mr. George Silk, a traveller, brutally used by three men in that town, night week, and was robbed of 50in in] . In the list of banking firms who have this year given extra sums to their clerks, that of Messrs. Hanley was included for 1,000. Thisis [This] stated to have been incorrect. on yesterday The Emigration Commissiovers [Commissioners] bave [ave] advertised for a vessel to proceed to Melbourne, to be ready for passengers between the 25th of February and the 3rd of March next. The Piemonte, [Piedmont] of the 6th instant, states that all the orange and lemen [lemon] tre-s [te-s] were fruzen [frozen] in th. night of the 20th 'ult. in the neighbbourbood [neighbourhood] of Massa and Carrara. [Carat] The ' loss is estimated at 4,000. 'The [the] railway between Cairo and Alexandria is now open to general traffic, and the passengers come down in seven hours, the only break on the line being on the Rosetia [Rosetta] branch of the Nile, where the ferry is not yet completed. 'Lhe [He] non-commissioned officers and men of the Royal Sappers and Miners, Chatham, are under the instructiuns [instructions] of Captain Francis Du Cane in the use and working of the electric telegraph. 's Laneaster's Eastern's] eliptical [Elliptic] bore rifle has been issued to the 17th 24th, [the] 25th, [the] and 26th companies of the Royal Sappers and Miners; the 24th company is first for service, supposed to be the Baltic. An additional number of 40 sergeants and 40 privates of the Provisional Battalion, Chatham, are to be placed under Captain W. Nott, 83d Reyiment, [Regiment] fur instruction in the rifie [rifle] practice. Mr. Gorge Adams, superintendent of police for Here- [Hereford] ford, has been committed to gaol for a criminal assault on his servant girl, aged 16, during his wife's ubsence [absence] from home. . Last Suturday [Saturday] evening, about seven o'clock, Mrs. Walton, of High-roadwell, [High-Rodwell] was engaged marketing at the bottum [bottom] of the New Market, Halitax, [Halifax] and whilst there some light- [lingered] fingered person eased her of her purse containing 14s. Owing to the scanty rise of the Nile this year, a large tract of land which has not been watered will be exempt from paying taxes, and to cover this deficiency in his revenue the Viceroy will curtail the salaries of the govern- [government] ment [men] officials. The specie arrivals of last week amounted to less than 100,000. exports have included the whole of che large quantity of silver brought by the Mexican mail, apart from minor sums. The Champion of the Seas, the next mail-ship expected from Australia, is now 79 days out. Mr. Warren's Ten Thousand a Year recently made its appearance in the Russian language, at St. Petersburg, and is, we hear, with 'The [the] Diary of a Late Physician, in the course of translation into Danish, by the celebrated Hans Christian Anderson. Notwithstanding the severity of the season, the annual fair at Alexandria (in New Russia) was held as usual, but on account of the intensity of the cold few purchasers and fewer sellers appeared, and the business done was therefore extremely limited. The Guzette [Gazette] contains a Board of Trade notice, announe- [announce- announcing] ing that the importation of ballast and pig iron into Swecen [Sweden] is permitted on tbe [the] payment of a duty of one rix [six] dollar co per skeppund, [second] and that certain kinds and manufac- [manufacture- manufactures] tures [Tues] of iron tuay [tay] be exported at the same rate. The Duke of Argyll has notified tov [to] his tenantry in the island of Tierce [Fierce] that after the 15th of November last, no tenant paying under 30 of rent is to be allowed to use whisky, spirits, at weddings, balls, funerals, or any other gatherings. under pain ot receiving a notice to quit. The departures from the port of London for the Austra- [Austria- Australian] lian [loan] colonies during the past week have comprised five vessels-two to Port Phillip, one toSydney, [Sydney] one to Adelaide, and one to New Zealand-with an aggreszate [aggregate] capacity of 21 tons. The rates of freight exhibit a tendency to ess. [es] The Austrian Consul at Jerusalem has received from his government a very large sum for the erection within the walls of the town of consular buildings, an hospice, and a palace for the Archbishop of Vienna. The Latin Patriarch is building a palace for himself and a coilege [College] at Beit [Best] Sala, [Sal] near Bethlehem. On Sunday three boys broke irto [it] the ice on Worsbro' [Worst] reservoir, near Barnsley, and had a narrow escape from being drowned. It was for some time after two of them had been got out before any symptom of life showed itself. Two other boys had a similar escape on the reservoir at Bevor [Before] oyle. [ole] On Wednesday night a man, a tramp, with his wife and two children, tuok [took] up their lodgings in the cabin of a coal- [coal pit] pit at Drighlington. While there the woman was delivered of a fine temale [female] child. The family had no clothing to put on it. The parish authorities took charge of the mother and babe, and both are doing well. An order has been issued from the War Office to the military authorities at Chatham, that the corps of the Royal Artillery and Royal Sappers and Miners shall be furnished with their daily rations from the commissariat department on the home stations, the same as the cavalry and line, commencing on the 1st of February, The engineers sent out to survey the Isthmus of Suez bavereturned [returned] to Alexandria, and generally report favourably on the practicability of the can l to join the Mediterranean and Red Sea. 'lhe [he] Pasha is highly pleased that his favourite project should be countenanced by the enzineers, [engineers] and their report is to be sent to Constantinople, to obtain, if possible, the adhesion of the Sublime Porte to the scheme. A considerable number of mechanics, principally ship- [shipwrights] wrights and shipjoiners, [ship joiners] at Sheerness yard, have demanded and obtained for the purpose of proceeding up the river Thames fur employment at merchant yards. The inducement is the high rate of wages paid for job and taskwork [task work] by private builders, compared with the dockyard rate of prices for similar work. The unfortunate gentleman, Mr. Cook, whose untimely death at Rugeley has caused such a sensation throughout the country, was, the year before last, at Newcastle Kaces, [Races] and, under the name of Pell, by which he was known on the Turf, prosecuted before the magistrates for being present in a gambling house in Grainger-street when it was entered by the police. The banquet to Mr. W. H. Russell, the special correspon- [response- correspondent] dent of the Times in the Crimea, now at home upon a short leave of absence, is to come off at the London Tavern to-day (Saturday). The entertainment has been got up By Mr. Albert Smith and some of the chvice [choice] spirits of the Fielding Club, and will be confined to three or four score of Mr. Russell's personal friends and admirers in the literary, dramatic, and legal world. Mr. Roebuck, who, we are glad to find, has returned to town with renewed health, has undertaken the cause of the public empfoyees, [employers] and will present the petition from the civil servants who entered since 1829, praying to be put upon an equality with their felloy-servants [fell-servants] who entered before that year, as respects the scale of superannuation, and the abolition of the oppressive tax upon salaries. -- Daily News. The Queen has been pleased to direct letters patent to be passed under the great seal, granting the dignity of a Baron of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland unto the Right Hon. Sir James Parke, knight, late one of the Barons of her Court of Exchequer, for the term of his natural life, by the name, style, and title of. Baron Wensleydale, of Wensleydale, in the North Riding of the county of York.-Fridays Gazette. In sume [sum] further proceedings connected with the recent trial on the validity of crossed checks in the Court o Queen's Bench yesterday the court most con- [confirmed] firmed Lord Campbell's ruling with regard to the existing law, and hence the mercantile community must understand that the practice of crossing checks affords no protection whatever ayainst [against] any persons of ordinary acuteness who nee wish to misappropriate them, m. Stephenson, of Barnsley, was on Monday com- [committed] mitted [fitted] to take his trial at the next intermediate sessions, for takmg [taking] money from the till of Mrs. Sarah Blenkinsop, the Duke of York Inn. The prisoner was apprehended by Broadhead, one of the Barnsley detectives, at Gawber Hall, on Wednesday. The prisoner, who pleads guilty to the charge, was tried at the Rotherham sessions, 1853, for a similar offence at the house of Mr. Cassels, of Barnsley. ; Lord Panmure is suffering from a severe attack of gout, which has affected his right hand. A conterence [conference] would have been held at the War Department on Friday, in the middle of the day, cf a committee of the cabinet ministers to meet some of the principal naval and military autho- [author- authorities] rities, [cities] but the illness of the Secretary of State for War caused the meeting to be postponed. The the] attack also pre- [pre] re his lordship from attending the Cabinet Council on riday. [Friday] states that the sufferings of the people in that neighbour- [neighbourhood] hood are very great, and throws the blame on the allies in the following curious manner The [manner the] cold is more grievously felt, he says, in all the surrounding villages, because the heat from the bombardment was so intense that it dried up and caused to fall all the moss which is used for filling up interisties [interests] between the plankings of wooden habitations, and so the cold penetrates within. We understand it is in contemplation forthwith to retire an additional number of captains and flag officers, who, by age, infirmities, civil or other employments, are incapaci- [increase- incapacitated] tated [stated] m [in] again serving afluat. [flat] The vested rights of the officers who are to be retired will be carefully observed. This will make avery desirable move among the active officers.-We are enabled to contradict the report that orders have been issued for the embarkation of 800 men of the Household Brigade of Guards for Malta.- [Malta] United Service Gazette. Among the officers of the Swiss Legion, who joined the depot at Dover, was a certain Baron, who arrived with one of the detachments from Switzerland about three months ego. This gentleman having taken the oath of allegiance, received, not only the ninety days' pay allowed by the prevoyance [prevalence] of the British government for his outfit, but agreeably to her Majesty's regulations, an advance of a month's pay, in all somewhere about 70, A few days' atter [utter] he asked for a week's leave of absence, to return to Switzerland, on urgent private affairs. He now declines to pet bis engagement, e Trusty, 14 guns, floating battery, Captain Frederick A. Campbell, and the Thunder, floating battery, 14 guns, Captain, George G. Randolph, are both being 'titted [fitted] with gutta percha speaking tubes leading frum [from] aft to forward on the main gundeck. [undecided] communicating with the intended shot- [shot proof] proof look-out house on deck for the officer in command giving orders for placing ship in time of action, and for giving, from any given number of guns, a concentrated broad de fire, r. William Wolfe Bonney, the inventor of this mode of communication during action, has recently been engaged in superintending the fitting of similar tubes to all the French floating-batteries nuw [new] fitting at the Fronsh [French] ronal [Royal] dockyards. the Sardinian government is displayin [display] ivity [activity] i its naval department. It is intetided [intended] to launch, mone [money] as possible, the 'screw frigate Vittorio [Victoria] Emmanuele [Emmanuel] of 50 guns. The sailing frigates which are disarmed will be pre- [prepared] pared for active service; and a levy of 1,000 seamen is going on at this moment. But this flotilla is not meant to Join the allied forces in the Baltic. It will be directed to the mouths of the Danube, if the efforts made by Austria for peace are not successful. The navy wants officers, and it has commenced receiving some belonging to aoe [are] navy, who had emigrated to Piedmont. ovd [old] of Trieste, in order to aj i increased their pay, K Sep SAsir [Saris] sea captains, has A letter from Helsingfors, [Holdings] given by the Northern Bee, The institute of Sweden has unanimously Prince Lucien Bonaparte, who now finds himself a mene [men] of almost all the academieg [Academies] of Europe. M. Tamberlik, [Tumbler] says a Paris letter, is engaged for R; at 1,000 a-month. Steiger, [Steiner] a favourite tenor at Vien [Vine] has accepted an engagement at New York. na, A private letter from Hamburg, dated the 10th, stateg [state] that orders have been just given by the Swedish Govern. t at Sheffield, was t i 1 ' number for corps in the Crimea; the volunteers to recive [receive] ment [men] to fit out at once in the port of Carlserona [Calderon] of the line, three frigates, and four corvettes. One of the great Arab chiefs of the province of Con stantina, [instant] named Mchammed-Ben-Daool, [Charmed-Ben-Daily] has sent his to a preparatory military school at Versailles, and intends to get him admitted to the establishment of gt. Cyr, [Cry] The Montteur [Monte] of Tuesday contains the revenue return for 1855. In indirect taxes there is, as compared with 1854, a net increase of 103,619,000 francs, and as com pared with 1853 an inerease [increase] of 101,075,000 franes, [frames] . The police of Berlin have forbidden the the capital to admit of Ns pretendin [pretending] to want wivesand [pheasant] husbands, such announcements being contrary to propriety. g The depot of the 59th regiment, in the Belfast districy [district] being about 600 strong, an order trom [from] the Horse Guards has been recvived, [received] calling for volunteers, to an unlimited two ships Newspapers of a guinea bounty, one half to be paid immediately, and the remaining half when they join their new corps. Times Lieutenant-colonel James, KLE, [LE] FOS, [FS] the head of the trigonometrical survey of the kingdom, and who was for. merly [merely] attache to the geclozical [geological] survey of the country ts delivering a gratuitous course of lectures on practical geology to the members of the Suuthampton [Southampton] School of ' Art. A man named Joseph Ogden. aged 29, an 06 Messrs. Ashton's factory, Hyilu [Hill] (senerally [generally] tlesiumetcl [mettlesome] the Hollow Factory), was killed about twelve o'clock on Tues. day morning, by bein [being canght [caught] by a in the fuctory [factory] and whirled round, and his brains knocked out, The deceased has left a wife and one child. A new planet was discovered on Saturday evening Chacornac, at the Observatory of Paris, equal to that of a star of the ninth or tenth magnitude It is situated in the constellation ot Cancer, sume [sum] fow [ow] degrees to the south-east of the nebulous Presepe.-Galig- [Preserve.-Gallia- Malignant] nants [ants] Messenger. gy The Prince of Wales took the chair the other da a public occasion, The Prince has been attending Fara- [Far- Faraday] day's lectures. Prince Albert, it so happened, was unable to attend-the chair was vacant-it mnst [inst] be filled. The boy Prince took the chair, and to the surprise of many. behaved like other boys, with great modesty, and of course, good sense. , About five o'clock on Monday afternoon a fire broke out in the blowing room of the mill worked by the executors of Messrs. Horsfield, Hyde Lane, cotton manufacturers, Hyde. It appears to have originated from some loose waste nearthe [neath] blowing room. 'The [the] fire was fortunately extinguished in a very short time by the men on the premi- [prime- premises] ses, [se] and the damage is trifling. A letter from Roma, in the Piemonte [Piedmont] of Turin, states that M. Jegher, [Higher] a lieutenaut [Lieutenant] of artillery of the Swiss Guards at Rome, has been arrested by order of the govern- [government] ment, [men] and taken to the prison of'St Michele. M. Jegher [Higher] it is added, has been several years in the service, and has never been known to meddle with the politics of the Roman States. On Monday night the shop of Mr. Henry Wilkinson, butcher, Blackburn-street, Little Bolton. was entered by means of skeleton keys, and robbed of three legs of mut- [mt- mutton] ton, a brisket of beef weixhing [weighing] about 20 bs., a sirloin about on 40 Ibs., [Is] and a whole crop. The beef would weigh ahout [about] 120 lbs.-The [lbs.-the] same night, between cight [eight] and vine a cheese, about 17 lbs, weight, and worth 8d. per pound, was stolen from the shop of Mr. James Whitworth, of Dawes- [Street] street, Bolton. On Sunday last, Thomas Rose, a young man, a mechanic, was skating on a lodge ot water, at the old works, Walsden, near Ruchdale, [Rochdale] with a comrade named Whitaker Schofield. The ice broke, and Rose went in. Schofield pulled off his coat, and threw one extremity of it to Kose, [Rose] but the ice began to crack under Schotiel l's [School l's] feet, and he was com- [compelled] pelled, [celled] for his own safety, to leave his companion, who- [who sank] sank and was drowned. His body was nos found till ten o'cock on Tuesday morning. Spirit of Punch. WHAT NEXT Richard Cobden who as bold as a brazen Lion told us, That to shatter the huge, ill-knit bulk of Russia to pieces, Weald vow' gobs Bull no more trouble than it cost him, there to ouble, [double] By the clenching of his fist, a foolscap sheet in creases; Lo, at length he hath nucrympled [crumpled] the foolscap he then rumpled, And upon it, or perhaps in tt, a pamphlet he hath written, To demonstrate how that Russia, to the wall if we should push er, Is sure, for reasons given at length, tocrumple [to crumple] up Great Britain. Considering which circumstance, Punch must repeat the text Of Richard Cobden's pamphlet, by asking him- WHAT NEXT Richard Cobden, the political economist so e ritical, [e Radical] Who turn'd so often inside out Protection's famous reason, That dependence of a nation upon foreign importation, In war would bring that nation very soon its bended knees on 3 To show that his old reasoning is of su -h perfect seasoning, That its links won't break, not even if you reund [round] about twist'em Now proves that Russ salvation 'gainst [against] an enemy's invasion Is based, and firmly based too, on a Protective system. Considering which consequence, Punch must repeat the text Of Richard Cobden's pamphict, [pamphlet] by asking him- WHAT NEXT Richard Cobden, who calls gammon all rev'rence [rev'rents] save of Mammon, And blazons s. d. on hiscotton [his cotton] flag unfurl'd, With in hoc [ho] signo [sign] vinces [vines -who millionnaires [millionaire] holds Princes, And money the true sinews-the life-blood of the world, Since a man with money in his purse is frighten'd for his guineas, While a man with none can laugh though thieves the country scour ; Now contends that treasure of her weakness is the measure, And, per contra, that the poverty of Russia is her power- [reconsideration] Considerihg [Considered] which syllogism, Punch must rcpeat [repeat] the text Of Richard Cobden's pamphlet, by asking NEXT 9 Richard Cobden, platform bouncer, and passionate denouncer Of Austrian oppresion [oppression] and Austrian intrigue- [integrity] Richard Cobden, far-seen traveller, and popular unraveller [traveller] Of Prussian short-sightedness in her commercial League, Contends that as the German the Allies cannot determine To join them by appeals to pride, or policy, or pelf ; Therefore, Austria und [and] Prussia are sure to tackle Russia, Magnanimous, single-handerl, [single-Handel] if but left each to herself ; Considering which sequitur Punch must repeat the text Of Richard Cobden'spamphlet, [Cobden'pamphlet] by asking NEXT Richard Cobden, Free Trade's prophet, contentedly can doff it Aside, and gravely argue, to prove 'twill be no loss for us, Though in the North and East, Protection's great High-priest, Lay his left hand on the Sound and his right hand on the Bosphorus. Freed rae friend unmoved can mark the Russ vulture's shadow Broaden slowly over Europe, from the White Sea to the Black, And when to clip her pinion, aud [and] forbid her more dominion. England's voice cries sternly Forward -Richard Cobden dares ery [very] Back. All which consier'd, [consider'd] Puack [Pack] drops Richard Cobden and his text, And leaves to the West Riding to answer his WHAT NEXT -- MERRILY DANCED THE QUAKER BRIGHT. Song for the Soiree given by Manchester to her Putriot [Patriot] Members. Mernly [Merely] danced the Quaker Briht, [Bright] And merrily dancet [dance] that quaker, [Quaker] When he heari [hear] that Kars [Ears] was in hopeless plight, And Mouravieff [Favourable] meant to take her He said he knew it was wrong to fight, He'd help nor devil uor [or] baker, But to sce [se] that the batrle [battle] was going right, O merrily danced the quaker. [Quaker] Merrily danced the Quaker Bright, And merrily danced the quaker, [Quaker] When the Generals lost the plice [police] that might Have been made another Jean dl' Acre, He roar'd for joy to bshold [should] the sight, And his sides he sho k [so k] like a shaker ; And merrily danced the Quaker Bright, O merrily danced that quaker [Quaker] Merrily danced the Quaker Bright, Aud [And] merrily dance t the quaker, [Quaker] When Kars [Ears] was left without sup or bite, And her heroes had to forsake her He dash'd his broadbrim [broad brim] down in delight, (To the great content of its maker), And merrily danced the Quaker Bright, O merrily danced the ynaker. [baker] SHORT. IF NOT SWEET. What next and a are i ot Sholay, [Scholar] and What next are the questions of And Punch begs to answer the petulant body First, give his friend Russia a merciless hiding, And, next, kick Sneak out of Yorkshire's West Riding. - SuM [Sum] FoR [For] Mr. Cugpey.-How [Cup.-How] many Russian Steppes are equal in politics to une [one] English League NEXT SPRING IN THE BALTIC.-It is said that the next of the Baltic tlvet [velvet] will, in an especial manner, j contratiet [contradict] the Russian sarcasm, touching asinine leaders of leonine heroes. lions, ReaL [Real] BENEFACTORS OF THE CHURCH.-Puseyites, [CHURCH.-Pursuits] New- [Animates] manites, [minutes] Lidtdellites, [satellites] Oxivurd [Oxford] Tractarians, and all other papists in disguise, who leave the church, and carry them- [themselves] selves and their Roman ductrines [doctrines] over to Rome as soon as possible. AN ENTERTAINMENT THAT IS ON THE POLITICAL CaRps. [Cars] -A public breakfast is to be given at Manchester to Mr. Bright just befure [before] parliament opens. The next entertain. ment [men] in store for the honourable Russian gentleman will be something more than a breakfast-it will be, we not less than- Tea aud [and] Turn out. vW TO GaIN [Gain] Prussta.-Let [Prussia.-Let] our Ambassador to the Conrt [Court] ot Berlin represent to his Majesty, seriously, at the proper hour after dinner, that the allies comprehend France, England, Sardinia, and Turkey. The King will then see, that Russia has arrayed against her no less than eight powers. TERMS FoR [For] Brutes.-Strange as it may seem, the only languaye [language] which Russian diplomatists are capable of under- [understanding] stanling [standing] is inarticulate. For it is that which proceeds from the cannon's mouth. Vet what cana bear be expected to understand but a roar We trust the allies will make the Russian bear understand their meaning clearly enough by the roar of artillery. THaNKFUL [Thankful] FOR Mercies.-A Turf-man writing to the pres, professes great indignation against a contemporary, who, discussing the Rugeley case, says he 'could have found consvlation [consolation] had a couple of dozen of betting-men been got rid of. All we can say is, that knowing how many of these worthies infest the country, our contemporary is more easily comforted than we should Next spring, it is said, Lyons will lead Man KILLED on THE NEWCASTLE AND CARLISLE RalL- [All- Railway] WAY.-A [A] accident occurred on New Year's-day to a man named John Forster, engaged upon the Newcastle and Carlisle Railway. On the above day he was mineral guard upon th Kirkhonse [Workhorse] coal train, which was due at the Carlisle Station at 3.30 p.m.; and on arriving at Corby Gates the train was stopped for a short time to leave some waggon loads of coals. 'The [the] required number having been detached, Forster signalled the engine-man to proceed, and the train was accordingly put in motion before he had taken up his position upon the waggons. He allowed the train to go on for about ten yards, and then attempted to gain his seat, but his foot slipped from the sole of the wagyon [waggon] and he fell in front of the wheels, which passed over his thigh, crushing it in a most shocking manner. Medical aid was speedily obtained; but it was deemed expedient at once to remove him to the Carlisle Infirmary, to which place he was conveyed with as little delay a8 pos- [post- possible] sible. The poor fellow, however, never rallied, aud [and] in five hours after the accident he expired. No blame whatever, we understand, is attached to any of the company's ser- [se- servants] vants.-Carlisle [vance.-Carlisle .-Carlisle] Journal,