Huddersfield Chronicle (04/May/1850) - page 6

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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.
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HOUSE OF LORDS.
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Tuesday, April 30.
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The Marquis of WESTMEATH moved for copiegef all com-
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munications made in and since the month. of 'february,
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3.849, to the Board of Works. in Ireland, or to the Irish
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Government, by the Marquis of WESTMEATH, Sir MOSXAEE
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CHAPMAN, or any other landed. proprietor in the baron :
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Delyin and county of Westmeath, relative to the pt pic
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works carried on in that locality under what is termed ;
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LABOUCHERE'S Letter," and. the replies thereto, as well as
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t accom ying the same. :
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a Bone fow words from the Marquis of LANSDOWKE and:
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the Earl of MOUNTCASHEL, the motion was granted.
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On 'ie motion of Earl "GREY the Pirates Head-money
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Bill was reported.
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The House then adjourned..
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HOGSE OF COMMONS.
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Friday, April 26..
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DISTRESSED UNIONS ADWANGES AND: REPAYMENTS OF
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ADVANCES BILL. - On. a: proposition for going into com-
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mittee on this bill, Colonel Sisrhorp moved to defer the
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committee for six months....... Mr. H. HERBERT defended
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these grants, and a.regular Irish debate followed thereon,
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which was shared by Mr. French, Mr. R. Fox, Mr. P.
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Scrope, Mr. Monsell, and Colonel Dunne Upon a divi-
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sion the amendment was negatived by 132-azainst 12,. ane
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the house went into committee upon the bill, the clauses
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ef which, after much debate, and some. amendments, were.
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agreed to,.and the bill was reported.
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CHANGES IN THE Navication Laws. - hir.. M'grecor
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moved that, considering the recent. changes in the-Naviga-
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tion Laws and the'state of the rcvenne, it is expedient that:
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the stamps on marine assurances, bills of lading, and other
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mercantile documents, be abolished...... The CHANCELLOR
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of the EXCHEQUER said he must give- the same answer to
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this motion that he gave a few nights ago to the proposal
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to reveal the duties on paper and advertisements-namely,
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that he did not think it right, consistently with the in-
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terests of the country, to give up more taxes than he had
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done, nor to pledge the house beforehand te the abolition
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ef any particular taxes: ...... Lord' Jchn Manners, Alderman
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Thompson, and Mr. Hume supported' the motion, upon
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which. Lord J. RUSSELL said, the question was not whether
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these duties were defensible or not, but whether the finances
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ef the country and public credit should be maintained
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After some remarks from Mr. Duncan and Mr. Henley, the
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house having divided, the motion of Mr. M'gregor was
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negatived by 156 against &9...... Mr. DISRAELI, in a smart
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speech, remarked, that though the budget had been com.
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menced tvo months: ago, it was not yet finished, and no
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ene had any idea of the policy of the Government on. the
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vital.question of the national finances...... Lord J. RUSSELL,
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in.a very warm speech, defended the policy of the Govern-
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ment, and taunted the Protectionists with supporting any
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motion, from any party, in the hope of snatching amajority.
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He cailed upon them to bring forward a distinct motion in
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support of Protection Lord John MANNERS vindicated
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Mr. Disraeli and retorted upon Lord J.. Russell, who, he
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said, had not explained the financial policy of the Govern-
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ment....... Colonel Sibthorp and MR.. Hume having. briefly
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spoken, the House went into Committee. of Supply on the
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Navy Estimates. Immediately on doing so there was a
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call for progress to be. rep , which Sir F. Baring con-
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sented to.
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The Public Health Bill (perth) was postponed till Monday.
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Air. Roebuck's Select Committee on Sir Thomas Turton
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Was nominated.
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The other orders were then disposed of, and the House
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adjourned at a quarter past 12 o'clock.
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Monday, April 29,
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TREATMENT OF BRITISH.SUBJECTS OF COLOUR IN CHAR-
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LESTON. - MR.. COCKBURN. commented in indignant terms
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upon the-fact disclosed in a recent case befure a police ma-
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gistrate, that British subjects of colour might be seized on
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board a-British ship at the port of Charleston, . and impri-
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soned during the time the vessel remained in that port....
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...lerd PALMERSTON lamented that the subject was by no
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means new to Her Majesty's government ; it was an un-
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doubted fact that in the states of South Carolina and Loui-
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siana every coloured man, whether foreigner or-citizen of
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another state, might be seized' and' imprisoned.. In 1847
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Her Majesty's government had ordered our minister at
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Wasiington to remoustrate with the government of the
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United States against a law which was-not only inconsistent
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with the comity of nations but at variance: with the treaty
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of 1815; and the answer was, that the Federal government
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had no power to induce-the legislainre of South Carolina to
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alter its municipal law, and that, if the British government
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insisted upon its rights under the treaty, the government
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ef the United States would find the matter se difficult, if
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not impossible, to deal with, that it would'be obliged to
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take advantage of the stipulation which gave libarty to
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ether party to-put an end to the treaty of 1815 upon 12
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months' notice.
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AMENDED Savines' Bank Brtt. - The CHANCELLOR of
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the Excu<qquer introduced his promised bill, in the course
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of which he glanced at.the difficulties surrounding such a
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Meisure as that he was desirous of carrying through the
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house. At present all the control which the Commission-
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ers of the National Debt had over these institutions was,
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that they could close. their aceounts and' refuse-to receive
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any fur.her meneys from them ; they had: no pewer or au-
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thority to interfere with the management of the banks or
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the appointment of thoir officers. He did not. think it
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would be risht to leave those establishments just as they
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were, and tu lay any responsibility upen the government ;
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and on the other hand, if the government assumed the
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night of appointing all the officers of the banks, it would
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destroy the valuable principle upon which these institutions
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were founded. Proposing to take upon government the
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responsibility of the receipt.and payment of money, the
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bill repealed the. present law enacting that the treasurer
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should receive:no emolument, and it gave the Commission-
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ers cf the National Detit the appointment of that officer,
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to whom and by whom all mcneys would be paid, the bill
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making it a misdemeanour in any officer of a savings bank
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ether than the treasurer to reccive any deposits. 'ihe bill
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also repealed tie clause in the act of 1844. which took away
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the liability of trastees, who would be responsille for their
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ewn acts and. those of their appointees. Sir C. Wood
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then expiained' the proposed system of audit by a compa-
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rison of the depositcrs' books with the ledger, the auditors
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being subject to:an-inspection by an officer appointed by
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the Commissioners of the National Debt. The next object
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was to provide against the loss which the State sustained
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from these banks, of which large depositors availed them-
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scives, to deposit when the prices of the funds were high,
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2nd.to withdraw their deposits when: they were: low.. Ha:
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proposed to reduce the: limit of the: amount of deposit te
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#10, allowing the-depositor to.invest.that sum, through:
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the medium of the bank, in the funds, when he might
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begin depositing again. The annual loss of the government
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at the present rate of interest was. £42,000 ; he proposed
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therefore to reduce the: rate from 38, 5s. to.£3 per cent. to
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the banks, and 2s. lds. to the depositors; These rates
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would:sesure: the government against loss, and: cover the
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expense of management. Sinchartes thon explained the
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provisions in the bill enabling fiiendiy sosieties. to make
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further investments directly through the National: Debt
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Commissioners, and extending the power of granting annui-
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ties, and: the securing. cf sums payable: at a depositor's
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veoeeee
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death:......a genera discussion on the merits and defests .
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of the proposed Lili followed, but leave was ultimately given
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for its introduction.
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Ecclestastical Commission BILT. - Sir G. GREY moved
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thie second. reading of this bill, (which: iad come from the
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Lords): He-rauarked' that tiiis bill was foundad upen the
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report of the committee of 1247, and re-appoiited'in 1848,
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the government concuring with the committee - that: the-
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Gomposition of the cominission was unfavourable for the
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efficient. discharze- of the duties devolving on the com-
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missioners:. By thisit was proposed.that the -Crown showd.
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z2ppaint two iay commissioners, tle one to be paid, and
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seca third, to be-also paid, but appointed by the Arch-
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Vishop-of Canteibury. The-Church: Estate Commissioners.
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were: to, be-a committee, to manage the property of the
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Gommnissivn. Amongst the minor provisions was one which
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separated the-duties of treasurer and'sesretary, the former
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affice to be exeeuted by two of the Estate Commissioners.
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With referenge to-two provisions in the bilias passed by
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the House-of Lerds-one relating to the consoiidation of
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the episcopal and commen funds, the other concerning the
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endowiment of certain deaneries-Sir Georze. stated it
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was the: intention of the: government to propese- to
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restore the bill to. the, state:in which it was before. being
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altered. in these particulars. by the- House of Lords.......
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Mr. Hors an regarded! this bil as a sort of comproniise-
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but the-osly defect remedied by this bill was the appoint-
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mens of two.paid commissioners, which.was its great boon.
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He maintaining that the businessof the commission was
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gurely secuier,, and. that. theze. was na. neeesaity: for any
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ecclesiastical mamm¥ers at.all.. Cuurch. temporalities-could
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Be sufficiently protected by lay members ;: bishops were not
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the-church; which consisted of the laity. But; i 'ebjeeted
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th: bisho)» Beitys-vyon: the commission;, boceuse they wene
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wanted olsavhere ; and hy.drew a forcible contrast. between
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what tho. prelates of the church ought to be and what he
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alloged'they were;, In. the committes he should endeavour
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' extended, in many cases, to 25 per cent.
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THE HUDDERSFIELD CHRONICLE, SATURDAY, MAY 4, 1850.
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episcopal office........ Mr. Mr. Hors-
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man, whom he accused of reiterating, m the subject of
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\s bill framed for a particular object, relating to
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other objects, calculated to cast vituperation upon: the
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characters of those who were absent. Many of MR.. Hors-
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man's arguments he contended were founded! upon false
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assumptions, and he showed how beneficially epi
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superintendence acted upon the community in extending
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education as well as in promoti igious and. moral im-
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provement, whilst bishops, in-com n witii: other pro-
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ioners, were underpaid rather than overpaid. Yr.
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E. DENISON approved of the bill, and answered some 0:
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the objections urged against it by Mr. Horsman, suggesting,
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however,. some modification of the constitution of the
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Estates Committee.......lord-J.. RUSSEUL observed that all
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the objeetions offered to the bill were matter for considera-
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tion in committee; he thought Mr. Horsman was: not
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justified in founding a long declamation upon the question
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 : whether: there should. be two paid commissioners or three,
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and he did not subscribe to his-strictures - bishops.....
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Mr. OSBORNE made a keen attack upon Mr. Geulburn, in
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whose defence, Sir R. INGLIS administrated a rebuke
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to Mr. Osborne in terms of unusual severity, proceeding
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then to reply to Mr. Horsman....... Mr. 8. HERBERT after
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some discussion as to whether the debate should be adjourn-
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ed, and; an explanation of # personal kind betwixt Mr.
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Horsman and Mr. Goulburn, the bill was read a second
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time, and, the other orders having been disposed of, the
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House adjourned at a quarter past 1 o'clock.
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Po
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Puesday, Aprd 383,
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Taz Suave FRADE:-Sit J. PAKINGTON gave notice of
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his.intention,to-movean addition to a motion of Sir Edward
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Buxton, respecting the slave trade, on the 7th May, to the
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effect that a duty should be paid upon the importation of
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foreien sugars into this country.
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ARMING OF MERCHANT STEAM VESSELS. - Sir F. BARING,
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in reply to Mr. Anderson, stated that there was no inten-
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tion, on the part of the government, to make arrangements
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for the arming of merchant steam vessels, as a reserve for:
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the royal navy. ay ©
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PARLIAMENTARY Qatus,-Lord Joun RUSSELL said, in
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reply te-MR.. Page: Wood, that it was his intention to intro-
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duce:a bill on this subject into the house this session, as
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soon as the:state of public. business would allow it.
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In reply to Sir Benjamin Hall, Lord JOHN RUSSELL
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stated' that the Archbishop of Canterbury had: appointed:
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his son, a young gentleman now studying in the ' emple,
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to the second reversion of the office of istrar of the Pre-
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rogative Court of Canterbury. -nature of this office
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was; with others, undergoing inquiry before a select com-
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mittee of the house ; and it. was one. which, when. parlia-
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ment should deal with it; must be held by the person who
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performed the duties. Under the act of 1840 the young
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gentleman would have no right whatever to compensation..
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-/(hear, hear.)
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REDUCTION OF SALARIES. - MR.. HENLEY: moved an ad-
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dress to the Crown to direct a careful revisioniof the sala-.
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ries and wages in every department of the public service,
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with a view. to a just and adequate reduction of them.
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After a cursory. notice of the inquiries of this nature
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which had. been instituted under the authority of
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Harliament from 1821 until the select. committces of
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1849, he: observed that Lord John Russell had the
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other night proposed to refer to a committee the
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salaries in hres branches of the public service,
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namely, those of ms holding seats in Parliament,.;
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those in the diplomatie service, and those of judi-
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cial: officers, Each of these branches, however, stocd:
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upon special grounds,. whilst the. t: mass of the civil
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ex enditure was left untouched.. If Parliament deemed it
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right that these three branches should be subjected to
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inquiry, why should the rest escape revision? The total
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amount of salaries and wages paid in the Customs, Excise,
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Stamps and Taxes, Post-officc, Crown Lands, and other de-
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partments in 1848-49 was £4,327,000, not a farthing of
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which came under the: review. of Parliament. If to this
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sum were added those- eivil salariés and' wages which were
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annually submitted:to Parliament, namely, £2,647,000, the
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amount was £6,974,000. But this was not all ; there were
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salaries under the control of the Governmont paid out of
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the Exchequer to county court judges and officers in the
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courts of law amounting to not less than £500,000 ; so that
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the gross aggregate was £7,500,000 a year; exceeding by
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 ;
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£1,000,000 the whole expenditure for the effective force of
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'the army, navy, and ordnance. Mr. Henley then entered
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upon a minute analysis of the alleged reductions in the
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revenue departments during preceding years, the super-
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annuations, &c., and contended that the country: had not
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gained the advantage it hada right to expect from the
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modifications made m our system of taxation, so-that,. at
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all events, the revenue branch of the expenditure ought to
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be revised.. The great altcration of late years in the value
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of money, and the continued decrease in the rate of in-
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terest, lowering profits, rendered' all fixed incomes more
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valuable ; and although he did not say. that our legislation
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for t e last thrse or four years had been carried on with
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the view of securing such a state of things, it had the effect
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of establishing low prices. He then showed from statis-
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tical facts the reality of distress, and the pressure upon
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trade, which were further demonstrated by the state of
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rices. In 1828 the official value of our exports was
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£52,000,000, the declared value £36,000,000 ; in 1848 their
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official value was £132,000,000., the declared. value
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£52,000,000. The depreciation of our home products had
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Having thus
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shown tiie amount ef salaries exclnded from.the considera-
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tion of the Government committee; that there was a
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general ery for more work and less-money, and that there
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had been a great and general: reduction in the cost of all
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the necessaries and. luxuries of life, he thought he had laid
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a sufficient ground to induce Parliament to revise, in a spirit
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of just and true economy, this large branch of the public
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expenditure The CHANCELLOR of the EXCHEQUER re-
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marked that meat was higher in 1849 than in-1843, and
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potatoes nearly double the price. In spite of the difficulties
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of carrying out reductions of salaries and wages-for those
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who voted for such reductions in the House not unfre-
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quently complained to the Government of their cruelty-
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much had been done, not always by diminishing individual
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salaries, which was not "true and just economy," but
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generally by reducing the number of persons' employed,.
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from whom a greater amount of labour was exacte Sir
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-C..woomstated:- the retrenciments-which had been effected
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'in various public establishments, and this in the face of a
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considerable annual increase of business. He showed that
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other great establishmenis were not conducted at a less
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expense than those of the Government, the salaries paid
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by the Bank of England (211,000/.) being only 27,000J. less
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than those of the great offices of Government, whilst the
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Great Western Railway Company had proved by experi-
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ment that excessive reduction of salaries was false economy.
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The Government, therefore, having acted, and still acting,;
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upon-principles of true economy, he did not ask the House
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'to negative the principle of the motion, but, as it involved
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a censure upon the Government which was undeserved, he
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moved. the previous: question......colonel Sibthorp and
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Mr. Newdegate supported the. original motion, de-
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fending the positions of Mr. Henley....... Mr. HVME
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considered the object of the motion was to re-
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'move past abuses, doing injustice to no man, and. should
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'therefore-support it....... Mr. ROEBVCK intended to: vote for
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the motion, which:contained a mere traisin, and: would not
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ieffeet. the-objact which: Mr..henley professed to have in
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'view, and the Chanceller of the Exchequer would have
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damaged it more by assenting at once to this proposition of.
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new-born economy. Adverting, by way of example, to the:
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sgrades of succession of the working men in the Treasury-
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office, he appealed to the House whether they were over-
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paid, compared with men engaged in professional or mer-
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cantile pursuits. The heads of the Government were not
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over-paid, and if the subordinates were not, where was the
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excess? Only in the number of persons-;. ia what, then,.
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'consisted the-harm of this inquiry, and why should the mo-
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tion. be evaded by the 'previous question.":.....sir ROBERT
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PZEL, in answer to Mr. Roetuck, conceived. that the objpct
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.of themotion was not to institute-a: Parliamentary inquiry:
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'-which was already ordered into.the -salaries of the chief
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officers in three branches of the public service-but to force
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the Government.to fulfil a duty they were bound to perform...
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It. was not because the motion contained a truism that it
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ought.to be assented to. 'the House should 'not vote-tru-
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isms unless they had a practical object ; and by the "pre-
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vious ayestion" he. only meant to. say that. the. motion.
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would only load to disappointment, If he eould'charge tie
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Government withaegloct of the duty of retrenciiment, he
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would vote for the motion ; but hecould not join in passing
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'a reflection upon the Government, thinking there was ample
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proof that they had made. great reductions and desired to
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,contime in the path of retvenchment.. This motion.did not
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'refer to the great officers, butto the subordinate function-
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.arias, to tie fidelity and ability of many of whom Sir
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'robert bore testimc ny, andiha:eautioned the Houseagainst
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'reducing salaries.so low that offices to which confidence was
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'hecessarily attached would not be tenabialiy: mon with the
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feelings and principles of gentlemer.......mr..€obden said,
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if he voted for the motion, he must vote fur the general re-
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duction of wages throughout the country.. He objected to
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-an attempt to reduce wages, which he believed would be
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-impracticabla:; and he of jected to the reasons for it-urged
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'on the other side. It was said that thero had been large
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red'etions.in the price of commoditias.. If so, why. should
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not t':e working alasses cnjoy the benefit of the reducticn ?
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Rents, as a yeneral rule, had not been.reduced.; and so far
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ee
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a reduction of dees of commodities necessarily
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from sgn the oe Z the a 1
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for labour. It would Sheree Be impracticable for the
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i Government te out a simultaneous reduction of
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wages. A i axtisans, contem
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the reduction. of the:cost. of living, there
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dency to an increase of. wages. purely
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i ti, indleod, the labourers had. for 50 years past served
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only for the: means of subsistence, and when prices fell
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their wages: were reduced. He had heard Mr. Hume's
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speech with satisfaction; but every word of it was
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opposed to the motion, so that he-had made a h in
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one direction and would vote' im another.......mr. D1s-
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RAELI said, all agrecd, at least, that the pressure
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of taxation was excessive, and there was a general cry that
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retrenchment was absolutely necessary. The question
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naturally was, whatis the reason of this increased taxation,
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and how is this burden, which was not only grevious, but
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intolerable, to be relieved? Practical suggestions had
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been offered for that objest, but the government met them
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by charging the authors with bh faith with the
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country: and de ing the finances. So: far, however,
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from this; he-and his friends had not given any' vote which
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was not authorized by the state of the finances, with true
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regard to the claims of the pubhie creditor, at the same
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time with due consideration of their suffering constituents.
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This motion was in perfect accordance with parliamentary
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precedents and with the exigency of the time. The argu-
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ments of Sir R. Peel were derived from the case of Downing-
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street ; but Mr. Henley proposed to deal with £7,500, 000,
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and who could doubt that reductions might be effected in
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-so largea sum ?.,....lord J. RUSSELL said, his first objection
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"to: the: metion.was that it was unjust. He had before
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stated the reductions made in different government offices,
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revisions were still going on, and in the face-ef thisto go
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up with an address praying for a revision, as if none had
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taken place, would be an unjust imputation upon the
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government. Ifa reduction of salaries and wages were to
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be made upon the principle of a fall of prices, it would be
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unjust to a great body of gentlemen in the public service,
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who carried on the whole machinery of the government,
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and-he could'not consent to a motion by which a valuable
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elass'of men would be: injured' in their interests and pros-
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pects. But the motion extended to wages, and it would
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be impossible for the government to accept such a proposi-
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tion without creating an expectation in the country that
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they were about to make a general reduction of wages.
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Upon what. ground? MR.. Disraeli said there was so much
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distress in the country through. the repeal of the dity on
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corn that there was-no resource but to reduce wages..
419:
(lord John's) answer to this statement was, that it was
420:
not true; that, except in:a few agricultural countics, there
421:
had been no-such seduction of the wages which the labour-
422:
ing classes had' received before the act passed, whilst the
423:
condition of these classes, generally speaking, had im-
424:
proved...... After Sir C. Burrell had. made a few remarks
425:
and Mr. Henley had replied, the House divided, when the
426:
original motion was negatived' by 269 against 173.......MR.
427:
STANFORD moved fora select. committee to inquire if any
428:
restrictions should be.imposed upon the sale of poisons,
429:
which: motion, however, he withdrew on an assurance by
430:
Sir G. Grey that a bill was in preparation on the subject.
431:
The. other business having been disposed of, the House
432:
adjourned at.1 o'clock.
433:
Wednesday, May 1.
434:
Birntre0f A PRINCE. - Sir G..GREY voted an address to
435:
her Majesty, congratulating her Majesty on: the birth of
436:
another Prince, and assuring her Majesty that every addi-
437:
tion to her Majesty's domestic happiness affords the most
438:
sincere satisfaction to her Majesty's faithful Commons.
439:
LANDLORD AND: TENANT BILL. - MR.. Pusey having.
440:
moved the second reading of the above bill, Mr. Curis-
441:
TOPHER deprecated any interference between landlord and
442:
tenant, and concluded by moving that the second reading
443:
be deferred for six months..,...sir GEORGE STRICKLAND
444:
seconded the amendment After some discussion the
445:
amendment was withdrawn, and the bill was read a second
446:
time.
447:
Ratlway TRAFFIC Bitu. - Mr. J. L. Rrcarpo, in moving
448:
the second reading of the Railway Traffic Bill, explained
449:
and: vindicated: his. motives in introducing this measure,
450:
ad been a ten-
451:
eeeees
452:
the necessity of which had been recognised' by various Par-
453:
liamentary committees. The experiment. of legislative
454:
interference had succeeded ; some of the provisions of this
455:
measure had been inserted in recent railway bills, and the
456:
time he thought had arrived for general legislation respect-
457:
ing, these powerful corporations, upon whose uncontrolled
458:
discretion mgers and traders were now wholly de-
459:
pendent. . Ricardo explained the various provisions of
460:
the bill, the-most important of which was the equal-rate
461:
clause, requiring tolls to be.charged equally for all distances
462:
by the same trains, which he believed was the real-occasion.
463:
of the opposition offered by the railway companiesto this bill.
464:
MR..GIYN and Mr, B. DENISON opposed the bill......mr.
465:
LABOUCHERE ebserved that the object of this bill-to facil-
466:
itate the through traffic by. railroads, and to regulate the
467:
complicated relations of railway companies: with: each other
468:
and with the public, reconciling the interests of the com-
469:
munity with what was just to the companics themselves-
470:
was one of equal inportance and difficulty. He had ab-
471:
stained from introducing any measure upon this subject,
472:
first, because he was aware of the great unpopularity of
473:
the Railway Commissioners (incidental to their invidious
474:
functions), and the asking for additional powers would na-
475:
turally awaken jealousy and suspicion. Galaas, therefore,
476:
he had seen a general concurrence on the part of the public,
477:
or an amount of grievance which mace it his duty to inter-
478:
fere-for interference: with these companies should be
479:
exceptional-he did not feel justified in bringing forward
480:
such a measure; and before the beginning of this session
481:
there had been very little complaint. Another reason was,
482:
that in the present state of railway property it would be
483:
unwise to introduce another disturbing element. He
484:
thought it would be inexpedient to introduce any measure:
485:
upon the subject without. a. previous inquiry: kefore a
486:
select committee, and if Mr: Ricardo thought he could
487:
frame a committee at this period of the: session, he (MR.
488:
Labouchere) would regret that the House should express
489:
an opinion that no legislation was required, so that, if the
490:
question went to a division, he would vote for the second
491:
reading, that it might be referred to a select committee.
492:
But he recommended Mr. Ricardo to withdraw the bill,
493:
although its object was well worthy of consideration, some
494:
cetthe clauses being most unobjectionable.. After some diffi-
495:
culties"in connection with: this subject had been glanced at
496:
by Mr. Gladstone, the second reading of the bill was nega-
497:
tived.
498:
The House then went into committee upon the Benefices
499:
in Plurality Bill, with which it was occupied until near six
500:
o'clock, at which hour it adjourned.
501:
ATTEMPTED: SEDUCTION BY MEANS OF CHLOROFORN. - '
502:
At the Marylebone police court, on Tuesday, an embosser
503:
named Jopling, was charged with having. administered
504:
chloroform to a pretty-looking young woman, 20 years of
505:
age, his supposed object Srse doing being the violation of
506:
her person. It appeared that the prisoner had visited as
507:
her suitor during the last nine montlis.. Qn the previous
508:
night she accompanied him to a singing room at a public-
509:
house in Munster-street, Regent's-park ; her brother-in-law
510:
was also of the party. At half-past 12 they all quitted the
511:
concert, the complainant and prisoner walked: arm-in-arm
512:
together. They stood talking for a short time in the-road
513:
near her aunt's dwelling (the brother-in-law having left
514:
them), and the prisoner afterwards took her down a yard,.
515:
when he acted towards her in a very indecent manner..
516:
She asked him what right he had thus to insult her, upon
517:
which he-uncorked a phial, and having poured the contents
518:
upon his handkerchief he applied it to her nose and mouth.
519:
She immediately raised her hand and thrust the handker-
520:
chief from her, and then called as loudly as she was able
521:
for the assistance of the police. The case stood adjourned
522:
in the absence of a material witness.
523:
MR.. GORHAM'S Soy. - We have heard that Mr. Gor-
524:
hain's son, who is at Cambridge, has: espoused a party the
525:
very reverse of his father's; and walks abeut with a
526:
cross on his breast, and ostentatiously displaying other
527:
Catholic emblems.. As the Prince of Wales used to sur-
528:
prise George the Third by kicking at his door, and shout-
529:
ing ' Wilkes: arg' the North Britons for ever!" so yo
530:
Gorham regalexgpis parent upon all oecesions with ardent
531:
praises of Henry of Exeter. - Hull Advertiser.
532:
WEALTH AND. PROSPERITY OF LEEDS....WE understand:
533:
that at the suggestion of Jos.. Bateson, Esq. the mayor,
534:
and several other gentlemen warmly interested in its pros-
535:
perity, a atecription has been commenced for the purpose:
536:
-of giving prizes for three essays " On the elements of wealth
537:
and prosperity in the borough-of Leeds, with suggestions
538:
for their further development." It is hoped-that a sufficient.
539:
sum will.be raised by private subscription to enable the
540:
subscribers. to offer sueh an amount of money in prizes as
541:
will be an indicement for able writers to employ their
542:
talents in the competition. It has. been. proposed that
543:
£200 be: awarded for the best essay, £100-for the second,
544:
and £50 for the third. For the last few years Leeds-has
545:
not kept paee with the progress of some of the-other manu-
546:
facturing and. mercantile towns-in: thie West Riding, and it
547:
'behoves- its. inhabitants: te. know, in. order to providé a
548:
remedy. witat is the cause of iat dapression which has for
549:
'some: time affected the value-ef. ranch of its building and
550:
'other property ; but the depression is capable of removal
551:
if the natural advantages ard' numerous resources of the
552:
borough and district.be properly cultivated. - Leeds Latel-
553:
def NCET ee
554:
raneously with :
555:
His.
556:
FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE,
557:
i ceive rumours: of. an i i
558:
robably in this order :-Mr. Crittenden, or Mr. Bell, of
559:
pnneiee, for of State; Mr. George Evans, of
560:
Maine, for Secretary of the Treasury ; Mr. Gentry, of Ten-
561:
nessee, for Secretary of War; and Mr. Thomas Butler
562:
ing, of Georgia, for Secretary of the Navy. The Hon. F.
563:
ident of the' Bank of oe State of South
564:
i 'accepted the appointment of successor e
565:
tots Mr' Calhoun. Per. Foote' resolution to refer the slave
566:
question to-a:select committee was still pending. .
567:
Reports of a contradictory character were current with
568:
regard to the Nicaragua treaty. According to: the Wwush-
569:
ington Union 'a treaty for the adjustment of the question
570:
had been proposed by Sir H. Bulwer to the Secretary of
571:
State, with the condition that it be promptly ratified or re-
572:
jected." According to the correspondents of the New
573:
"york press, no such
574:
event had taken place, although the
575:
tiations were progressing in a satisfactory manner.
576:
" Senate e United:states, on. t
577:
ing a debate on California and slavery, a violent altercation
578:
occurred: between Benton and Foote, in the course of which
579:
Foote drew a pistol and aimed at Benton. Foote was im-
580:
mediately disarmed, and a committee of investigation ap-
581:
inted.
582:
Peon the 18th a resolution was sod in the Senate re-
583:
ferring the whole question of California and the territories
584:
to a committee of 13, to report a plan for compromise.
585:
Trade generally is very dull, and cotton spinners are
586:
now. working at prices far disproportioned to the value of
587:
the raw material. This is the consoqpence of the peculiar
588:
method on which they conduct their business: Goods sold.
589:
at a credit never less, and often longer, than eight months,
590:
brought forward speculators during the last summer, who
591:
purchased all descriptions of heavy goods on the supposi-
592:
tion that the shortness of the crop must cause prices to rule
593:
very high. In this calculation they have been disappointed,
594:
and many of them now force their g on the market
595:
under the imperative necessity of selling at en re
596:
duced rates in order to meet the liabilities incurred by
597:
their purchase..
598:
Canada. - Canadiam accounts armounce that a destrue-
599:
2
600:
H. ore;
601:
n- the
602:
arising from the unusual quantity of rain. Many houses,
603:
bridges, &c., had been swept away. Licenses had been
604:
issued in blank to the collector at Quebec to admit foreign
605:
ships to the privilege of passing up to Montreal, making
606:
the latter city practically a free port. The Guzeite men-
607:
tions that the Executive intended to bring in a bill to im-
608:
prove the channels uf the St Lawrence, with a view to in-
609:
crease the safety of the navigation.
610:
Spain. - A strange intrigue has taken place in the palace
611:
of Madrid. The King Consort endeavoured to induce the
612:
Queen. to free- herself from what he calls her slavish submis-
613:
sion to the' ministry of Narvaez, and solemnly declared
614:
'that, ifshe-did:not comply with his wishes, he would on
615:
the very day of her accouchement quit Spain, and publish
616:
to the nation a manifesto explaining his reasons for taking
617:
such a step, and for not choosing to be present at the birth
618:
of the royal infant. In this extraordinary emergency a
619:
council of ministers was held, and it was decided. in order
620:
to save the honour of the Queen, that the King shoald be
621:
prevented by force from quittiug the palace. His Majesty
622:
was, therefore placed under arrest ; sentrics were stationed
623:
at the door of his apartment, ond he remained a prisoner
624:
for four hours, at the end of which time he capitulated, and
625:
even consented to ride out in the evening in an open car-
626:
riage with the Queen. This conduct of the imbecile King
627:
Consort is attributed to the intrigues of the Carlists, who
628:
not only wish to overthrow the present Ministry, bnt to
629:
throw impediments in the way of the succession to the
630:
crown of the issue of Queen Isabella.
631:
i
632:
FRELAND-~
633:
Banquet Te Lorn: Gorcr. - On Saturday evening the
634:
gallant Viscount was entertained at a grand banquet given
635:
by the United Service Club to celebrate his Lordship's re-
636:
turn to his native country after his brilliant services in
637:
India. Lieutenant-General Sir Edward Blakeney presided
638:
on the occasion ; 100 members sat down to dinner, several
639:
standards taken from the Sikhs by the 31st and other regi-
640:
ments were displayed, and the seene altogether was of a.
641:
most brilliant and: interesting doseription.
642:
DEATH OF THE BISHOP OF CLOGHER. - Died, in Ireland,
643:
on Friday night, the 26th, of inflammation of the chest and
644:
liver, from cold, the Right Rev. and Right Hon. Lord
645:
Robert Tottenham, Lord Bishop of Clogher, only brother
646:
of the late Marquis of Ely. the bishopric of Clogher
647:
.merges in the primacy. - Morning Heraid..
648:
The Marquis of Clanricarde has appointed G. C. Corn-
649:
wall, Esq., secretary to the post-office for Ireland ; and A.
650:
W. Blake, Esq., of Furbough, county of Galway, has been
651:
appointed to succeed Mr. Cornwall as private secretary to
652:
the noble marquis. - Globe.
653:
SUICIDE OF Two SOLDIERS. - In the military barracks of
654:
this:town on Monday evening last, a private of the 74th
655:
Highlanders, named William Williams, shot himself through
656:
the head. On the following morning, about a quarter past
657:
seven, while the men were on parade, another private of
658:
the same regiment, named Duncan Love,.also drove a-
659:
musket-ball through his skull. The two men had'no-at-
660:
quaintance with each other. - Cloninel Chronicle.
661:
The accounts from all parts of the country on the pro-
662:
gress of the crops are most cheering. The weather con-
663:
tinues favourable, although sometimes chilly and overcast ;
664:
-and' fine: specimens of new potatoes have been produced in
665:
various quarters,
666:
The cholera has made its appearance: at Castlecomer, in
667:
the county of Kilkenny, and in Bagenalstown, in the ad-
668:
joining county of Carlow. In the former locality there have
669:
been five cases, three of which proved fatal, one recovered,
670:
and one still under treatment. In the latter there have
671:
been six cases, two of which resulted in death, the re-
672:
mainder bemg under treatment.
673:
4A. Galway town councillor and poor-law guardian lost
674:
several of his teeth from the blows of a guest, at his hespit-
675:
able table, last week, in a aispute' about the gentility of
676:
their respective families !
677:
On Sunday week, William Sheahan was arrested in the
678:
act of picking pockets in the Dominican Chapel, Limerick,
679:
during the celebration of mass. The policeman found
680:
twenty-six handkerchiefs on the prisoner !
681:
THE Loss OF THE " ROYAL ADELAIDE"-One of the un-
682:
fortunate victims in the wreck of the above-named steamer
683:
was 2 poor man named Canavan, who had been a servant
684:
ina gentleman's family near P His-loss was ren-
685:
derect.still more bitter to his unfortunate family from the
686:
circumstances which causod him to be in the vessel on the
687:
night she was lost. An officer who belonged to a regiment
688:
lately ordered off from this city, having seen this poor man's
689:
daughter, who was a very pretty-looking girl, set about his
690:
base-purposes with regard to her, and eventually persuaded
691:
her to go off with him. The r father, immediately on
692:
hearing she-had left where-he Kad"placed her in: Cork, un-
693:
derstanding where she went, set off in pursuit of her, and
694:
lost his-lifein endeavouring to save her. - Cork Examiner.
695:
REMORSE OF AN UNFAITHFUL WIFE. - At the Liverpool
696:
Police Court, on Friday, a voman, wife of Ambrose Yates,
697:
a firensen onthe East Lancashire Railway, was charged with
698:
attempting suicide; she had been removed by the police
699:
from the engine on which her husband was,-the engine
700:
being then about starting with a train, and, in anger and
701:
despair, she ran and threw herself across the rails, in front
702:
of the moving carriage: The husband'of the prisoner sta'ed
703:
that, about'a fortnight ago, he found his wife in bed with a
704:
man. She was the mother of three: children, and in conse-
705:
quence of her incontinence, lie-had' removed them all from
706:
her. The engine-driver said, tfizt. when-the prisoner was
707:
put off the engine she said to her husband, 'I will either
708:
@ killed where you are, or live with vou; and ran quickly;
709:
round the tender and threw herself upen the-rails in front of
710:
:the train. He reversed the engine as quickly as possible,
711:
but never supposed that the woman escaped being cut
712:
'ig two until he saw her afterwards.
713:
Clostnc-o@ ANOTHER Savincs' Bayk. - In consequence
714:
of the illness of the actuary of the Lewes Savings' Bank,.
715:
in Suffolk, and some mistakes in his accounts, discovered
716:
in his absence, the bank has been closed until further
717:
notice. What makes the matter more remarkable is the
718:
-cireumstance that the accounts were recently examined
719:
and pronounced' to be correct. Of course nothing official
720:
has transpired, -but the: immediate cause of the announce-
721:
-ment that there were 'some: wmexplained recently-dis-
722:
covered errors in the accounts," is said to be as follows :-
723:
Last Saturday night, a book from a country depositor was
724:
handed to the manager for the night, of course in the
725:
actuary's absence, with a note requesting payment of the
726:
balance shown on the face-of the aceount, £28. ; the whole
727:
depesits- being £72., and the- withdrawals' £32 On
728:
reference to the ledger, however, the balance was found to
729:
be only 63s. The actuary denied that there was any défal-
730:
cation, and asserted that the whole weuld be found to be.a
731:
mistake,
732:
days; second,-tliat their successors would come most f
733:
17th, dur-
734:
tive flood had been experienced-in Toronto on-the dd inst.,
735:
Saat
736:
+h
737:
Ww
738:
Biss
739:
h
740:
SUNDAY MEETING OP FACTORY
741:
DELEGATES.
742:
The factory delegates from a great number of the »
743:
'and vi in this district had a meeting on (sunday), ..
744:
the Cotton Tree Inn, Ancoat's-street, to consider
745:
sition to. be submitted to them by the Central Commitne
746:
o ives for an-efficient ten hour (or 5S hours per -weeig,
747:
bill, by i ate ascept 60 hours per mow Ik was ox.
748:
pected' teat an e new pro m, while giving haif.
749:
' hour's work more per Gay deducted from met cee seni
750:
give a half-holiday every Saturday from two o tlocic
751:
would meet with great favour Operatives, §). -
752:
such does not appear to be the case from the course ken
753:
by the delegates.
754:
Mr. Henry Green was in the chair, and there -
755:
delegates present from tha following places: .
756:
overicokers, 2 ;. ditto short time commitice, 2: Wires,
757:
Mill, 2; Preston: overlookers, !; ditte shert time .
758:
mittee, 2; Hyde factory operatives, 1; Choriey <p
759:
1; Padiham short-time committee, 1; Drovixs.
760:
time committee, 1; Middleton short-time comm:
761:
Blackburn factory operatives, 2; ditto spinners, )- >.
762:
tolee factory operatives, 2; inf Shert-cme ~
763:
mittee, 1; Belmont overlookers, 1; Dewsbury say...
764:
committee, 1; Bolton overlookers, 1; ditto fete
765:
tives, 1 ; Enfickl spinners, 1 ; ditto faetory oper... >"
766:
' Macclesfield' shert-time committee, 2: Gorn. ,
767:
operatives, 2; ve spmaners,, 1: Newson
768:
} overlookers, 1; Astley Bridge factory operatives, '
769:
field Hall committee, 1 ; Manchester tine spinners, :
770:
card room operatives, 1; ditto overlookers" as", tiem
771:
ditto power loom overlookers, 2; ditto local comin:
772:
ditto central committee, 2; Salford spinners, 1. ©.
773:
ton factory operatives, 1 ; total number of delo. - . 4,
774:
A Delegate from Blackburn mover the first rx, .. -
775:
 : '¢ That the delegates from the factory workers of Lin...
776:
"yorkshire, anc: tie adjeining counties deeply -
777:
necessity for calling this meeting, to attend
778:
have at considerable expense been oblige!
779:
r tive districts, once more to reiterate their
780:
of the Ten Hours' Act, and their determination.
781:
of their constituents, never to rest satistied om: -,. -
782:
is fully and fairly carried out according to the iz.
783:
the legislature who passed it in 1847."
784:
A Delegate from Imont secemled the mun
785:
was cariel by a large majority.
786:
A Delegate from Chorley moved the seeonl nos.
787:
.' That this meeting, having been rendered neecx,,-
788:
letter which appeared im the Fimwes of Thun... -
789:
i 'A Manufacturer,' suggesting to the oper-.
790:
propriety of surrendering two hours per week, 2.
791:
tion being put in such a way as tv call tor 2 py;
792:
decisive answer from the factory operatives the
793:
country, we, the delegates here assembled. av...)
794:
of the present oppertunity to declare to the ~
795:
the legislature, and the British public, bech -,-
796:
and those whom we represent, that we nerer 71]
797:
.any such arrangement, nor to any other invsir
798:
'slightest degree a departure from the prin".;
799:
"hours Act, for which we, the factory workers, 4,
800:
enormous expense struggled so many years."
801:
A Delegate from Boston secuniled the motion.
802:
agreed to.
803:
A Delegate from Gerton, moved " That 2 peda.
804:
House of Commons, founded upen the forests
805:
esr
806:
emanate from this meeting, and that the vne say
807:
adopted."
808:
A Delegate from Waterhead Mill, near Ol Lui.
809:
-ed the motion, ancl.it was carried..
810:
A Delegate from Manchester, moved " Thar 1.. -
811:
be requested to introduce the clauses agr-wi
812:
conference, or any other matter that will sc
813:
and shift system, and give to the women an ;
814:
an efficient Ten Hours' Bill.
815:
The motion was seconded by 2 Delevate {2.3
816:
supported by a Delegate from Macelesicli.
817:
to unanimously,
818:
Siinctlar WAGER. - A very sineular aur
819:
Leeds on the 24th inst. Mr. Baker, the str.
820:
Cooke's Cireus, undertook, for a wager of 14. -
821:
himself in a basket 2 feet 7 inches in length, 1»
822:
in width, and the same in height; and in "hi.
823:
be conveyed on a car to the railway staci -.
824:
spatched to Bradford at half-past 2o'cloek fir).
825:
and to return to Leeds before half-past 6. Mr. 3...
826:
1) inches in height.. Atithe appointed time he ".
827:
pearance in front of the cirens, wearing a errs
828:
He placed his great coat at the bottom "Ff th.
829:
then got in himself, taking with him a bettl.
830:
a few oranges. The basket was closed, and »
831:
was Mr. Baker conveyed to Bradford. aml step. -
832:
Bermondsey Hotel. Here he remained tor 1
833:
time, when he was rc-20nveye to the railwa>
834:
despatched to Leeds, where he arrived a lit-l-
835:
pest 6, thus winning his singular wager.
836:
trom the railway on a coach, and in the pr:
837:
crowd was liberated from his confinement:
838:
circus,
839:
t
840:
ie
841:
Therapevttics. - The history of mevlicime is >> >
842:
tering to seience. It is questionable whether =..+
843:
disease, their causes and their cure, at this m. me
844:
time of Galen; it is certain that diseases are rite
845:
and in the agzregate as fatal. Every age has pr
846:
system. of artificial therapeutics which the nex:
847:
each has beasted in its turn ef eures, and thoy
848:
have been condemned as failures. Medicines -
849:
subjects of fashion. [sit not a positive pre
850:
yet unsettled; in fhet, that it has noe
851:
ic is little more thin conjectural +
852:
Pinny, "the opinions on the snbj
853:
numerous as the practitioners themselye
854:
mass of contradiction on the treatiment ou:
855:
namely, consumption, Stroll attributes it
856:
troduction of bark. Morton considers
857:
Ried ascribes the trequency of the dise:tse tu cis
858:
Brillonet asserts that-it is curable by mereurr 4
859:
that.consumption is an intlunmatery liseas~-
860:
by blecding, purging, cooling medicines. and +
861:
dori says it is a disease of debility, and sh.
862:
tonics, stimulating remedies, and a zenerous ¢
863:
mended vinegar as the best preventative of »
864:
sanit and others assert that consumption is 0%
865:
taking vinezer to prevent obesity. Beddees ~~
866:
glove asa specific. Dr Parr tonnd toxsieve o>
867:
his practice thau beneficial. Such are the o-u->
868:
ments of merical men!" And vet there cu
869:
theery of disease. Of the fallibility and eres:
870:
note have been more conseions than tmedieai r. -
871:
have been honest enough to avow their comeu-
872:
commend MESSRS. DU BARRY'S REVALENTA
873:
farina which careful analysis has shown to he
874:
root ofan African plant, somewhat similur tr
875:
It appears to possess properties of a highly cura:
876:
nutritive kind: and numerous testimonials, '
877:
questionabl: respectability, hare attested -
878:
merticine of every deseription in the efeetuc
879:
semoval of indigestion (dyspepsia) constipamen
880:
hervousmess biliousness, liver compinints, Tago.
881:
palpitation of the heart. nervous head ache io
882:
the head and ears. pains in almest every part uf -
883:
tudammanrition, and ulceration of the stumach. <7 -
884:
ou the skin, incipient consumption, dropsy. r
885:
heartburn, nausea and sickness during pret
886:
or at sea, low spirits, spasms, cramps, spleen. -
887:
panilysis, asthma, cough, inquietade, sleepla~
888:
blushing, tremors, dislike to society, wnitimess
889:
memory, delusions, vertigo, blood to the hes!
890:
anchely, groundless fear, indecision, wretche-
891:
self-destruction, and mzny other ecomphiuints
892:
admitted by those whe have nsed it. to be the
893:
fants and invalids generaily, as 2 never tarms W)\
894:
stomach, but imparts a healthy relish for lume) o.
895:
restores: the faculty of digestion and nervors
896:
enerzy to the most enfeebled. It has the hig:
897:
Lord Stuart de Deeies; the Venerable 3reu (6
898:
Stuart, of Ross-a cure of three years' ner
899:
General Thomas King, of Exmouth: Captain Pu
900:
R.N., of No. 4, Park walk, Little Chelsea, Lom i
901:
of twenty-seven years' dyspepsia in six week-
902:
Andrews, R.N.; Captain Edwards, RIN. ; W
903:
Barvister-at-Law, King's Colleze, Cambridce, '
904:
Sixty Years from: partial paralysis, has memd:c
905:
limbs in avery short time upen this excell:
906:
Charles Kerr, of Winslow, Bucks-a unre of 2s
907:
Mr. Thomas Woodhouse, Bromley-reeordin, =.
908:
from constipation and sickness during pret.
909:
'thomas Minster, of St. Savicca's, Leeds-a
910:
Rerveushess, with spasms and daily yvomurt
911:
Coroner of Bolton ; Captain Allen-revor fing
912:
Ats; Doctors. Ure and Harvey ; James
913:
Sydney-termee, Reading, Berks, lute sane
914:
ment-a cure of dropsy ; James Porter. E
915:
-# cure of 13 vearst congh, with
916:
-Esq., Lower Abbey-street, Dublin ;
917:
F.R.C.S., Dublin-a perfect cire of thi
918:
agony from aneurism, which had resis
919:
and twenty thousand other well-known in!
920:
set the discoverers and inperters, by Burry
921:
Bond-street, London, testinzentais uf the ex
922:
im whieh their health has been restored
923:
economical diet, after oll other reme:ties hati
924:
tur many Years, and all hepes of recuvery ou
925:
report of inpertant enras of the above comp
926:
nials from partiesof the highest respeetbilire.
927:
gratis by Du Barry and Co.
928:
Caution. - The name of Messrs. Du Burry's
929:
also that of their tirm, have been se closely mm
930:
lidls Guinot too carefully look at the omic sp
931:
lsu Messrs. Dn Barry's adiiress, 127. New Ber
932:
in order to avoid being imposed upon by ~!
933:
Arabian Revalenta." or other spurious oun!
934:
beans, lentils, Indian and oat meal, urdes 4
935:
the name, which hzve nuthing to recemmic!
936:
reckless audacity of their ignornmt and un~"
937:
pounders, and which, theugh wimirably ulapest:
938:
piny sud havvc with the deluate stemuch uf anu
939:
Siu
940:
Orr Ls
941:
4
942:
4
943:
i

view the contents page of Huddersfield Chronicle (04/May/1850)