Huddersfield Chronicle (04/May/1850) - page 5

The following is an uncorrected OCR conversion of a newspaper page and will contain numerous errors. The text is in the Public Domain.
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a oF.
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i nesday murnihg at seventeen minutes after eight
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Cn Wedmqucen was eately delivered uf a Pritite: tt the
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with bér Majesty were his Royal Highness Prince
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Lésock, atid Mrs: hilly,
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poms adjyoinitig were the other sietliea a étten.
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Sir James Clark and Dr. Ferguson, aiid the Min-
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cae nd Officers of State summoned on the occasion.
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na 'save Councillors present were the Duke of Welling-
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Th G eorge Grey, the Archbishop of Canterbury, the
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id raf London, Lord John Russell, the Duke of Norfolk,
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wee i B bane
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Marquis of Bredall ~ ;
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= hare gratifyiug bulletins mimaaa issued daily :
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"é kingham Palace, esday, yi.
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Bue Ten o'clock, at
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safely delive' of a Prince at seven-
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" Tee Queer rer eight o'clock this morning.
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teen Majesty and the infant Prince are well.
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Seen: Buckingham Palace, May 2, 1850, 9 a.m.
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"the Queen bas passed an excellent night.
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. oe Majesty and the infant Prince are going on favour-
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ably."
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room
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Albert, Dr:
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And in the
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LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.
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ROP ASLLL LILLE
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MUMIFICENT GIFT OF ROBERT BENTLEY,
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" -ESQUIRE, OF ROTHERHAM,
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THE TOWNSHIP OF LOCKWOOD.
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-. have just received intelligence, on going to
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ae ray Robert Bentley, Esq. of Roti erham,
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as during the present week, paid over to certain
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e ointed the sum of 1,5000., to be invested
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Coe bee of the poor of the township of Lock-
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'cod, and the Huddersfield Infirmary. We hope
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wie ae to furnish fuller particulars of this noble
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penefaction next wee
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x Wuit-MONDAY. - We are gratified to learn
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Holst acipal drapers and hosiers in this town have
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that, a cel complied with the request of their assistants,
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canst on oived on closing their several establishments on
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Whit- Monday. We trust that other establishments will
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dopt a similar course on this festive occasion, for we hold
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he che truth of the old saying-"all work and no play
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inakes Jack a dull boy.
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Cuess. - We understand that the Annual Gathering of
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Yorkshire Chess Players will take place in the Assembly-
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youm, Leeds, on Wednesday, the 22d of May, and from the
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oom spirit evinced in connexion with the movement, we
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Lear that the re-union on this occasion is ex to be
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one of no ordinary kind. .
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Her ROSENFELD, the wonderful ventriloquist, is sojourn-
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ug among us for six nights, and those who delight in the
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sus-vellous cannot do better than pay him a visit.
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A young man, named James Wilson, was charged by one
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f ia polinemes at the Guildhall, on Saturday, with being
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srunk and disorderly on Tuesday week in the Beast Market.
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ined 1s. and 7s. costs.
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PHRENOLOGY AND MEESMERISM. - Mr. J. Booth, of Brad-
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rd. delivered his third lecture on phrenology, on Monday
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vening last, in the Philosophical Hall. From the manner
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he subject was treated, the lecturer must have devoted
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nsiderable time to the study of the science; a number
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highly interesting mesmeric and magnetic experiments
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being made, which appeared to give general satisfaction
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som the frequent bursts of approbation. The audience,
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ough not very numerous, Was larger than on similar oc-
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asions of the kind.
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Mettuam CHURCH SUNDAY AND NATIONAL SCHOOLS. -
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Dn Sunday last two sermons were preached in Meltham
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ills Church, on behalf of the above schools-that in the
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ternoon by the Rev. A. Brown, M,A., Vicar of Calverley,
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id in the evening by the Rev. G. Hough, Incumbent of
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mth Crosland. The amount realised by the two services
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ras upwards of £20.
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MELTHAM. - Two very interesting lecturers on Palestine,
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ere dclivered in this place by Mr. J. C. Smith, to very
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umerous and highty detighted audiences on Monday and
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uesday evenings last. The lecturer illustrated a consider-
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je portion of his subject by the exkibition of a very
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wutiful model of Jerusalem as it is.
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LECTURE ON LIFE ASSURANCE aT MELTHAM. - On
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hursday evening last a lecture on " Life Assurance" was
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elivered by J. Lea, Esq., of Londen, in the National
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hool Rooms at Meltham. There was a erowded audience,
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ho seemed to take great interest in the subject of the
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ecture. At the conclusion a vote of thanks was awarded
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Mr. Lee by acclamation. We understand that on Wed-
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ssday next a lecture will be delivered in the same room,
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' a Returned Transport, "ON the Horrors of Trans-
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tation."
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We understand that the celebrated baths at Lockwood
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a open fur the coming season on Monday next, and will,
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p doubt, meet with a liberal amount of patronage among
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pr numerous readers,
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HVUPPERSFIELD TEMPERANCE BAND OF Horpe. - The
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st aggresate meeting of this javenile soeiety took place
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the Philosophical Hal, in this town, on Thursday even-
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r last, the chair being eceupied by Mr. Wm. Gaw-
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BOKPE, of London. Addresses were delivered by the Rev.
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'm. Crabtree. Messrs. Job Armitage, Wm. Watkinson,
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nd J. ©. Booth (town Missionary). The children sung a
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priety of pleasing and most enlivening temperance melo-
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 : under the efficient management of Mr. Enoch Svkes,
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he superintendent. This society was formed at the bevin-
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ug of the present year, under the control of a ladies'
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mnimittee, whuse earnest and well-timed efforts have beer
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wned with success, the number of children at present
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irolled amounting to upwards of 600-out of this number
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t more than two are known to have violated their pledze.
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reat praise is due to these ladies and gentlemen who are
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king such a deep interest in the present safety and well-
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ug of the children, and we hope the parents and guar-
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lans of this promising band will co-operate with the com-
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bite and friends of the Temperance Society in preserv-
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hy their children-and im arresting the progress of our
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inking customs. It is the intention of the Ladies' Com-
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hituee wo give the Band of Hope a treat at the coming
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yhitsuntide holidays, when a procession will be furmed,
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assiuy through the principal streets with music and ban-
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rs, the Gala Ground in Hightields, where they will be
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tertained with buns and milk.
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PROPOSED HUDDERSFIELD COLLEGE Bazaar. - Stimu-
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id by the signal success which has attended tie efforts to
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pise funds in aid of the Collegiate Institution, and by the
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ew Connesion of Methodists, the Council of the Hudders-
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eld College, we are glad to learn, are contemplating an
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peal in a similar manner to the generous support of the
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Wc, and partientarly to that of the ladies of Hudders-
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id. whose assistance in works of benevolence never fails
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ensuring success. For severa] years past the Council of
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he College have been enabled, in addition to the current
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penses of the institution, to liquidate portions of the ori-
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nal debt. due on the building, and it is to enable them the
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poner to discharge this debt, and thus free their hands to
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ipart a higher decree of eftietency to an educational insti-
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pte. which already ranks amongst the first of its kind,
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pst the contemplated bazaar of contributed articles is to
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Pleid. The hish favour in which the college is held, and
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pe uumerous frictids it possesses in all ranks and denomi-
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TUONSS, cannut but secure for the effort a large measure of
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UCCSS.
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Gamalinc IN a Brer-Hovse. - At the Geildhall, on
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lesday, betore J. Armitage and W. W. Batéye, Esqrs.,
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them Kuach. a beer house keeper, in Lower-head Row,
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P Charged, on the information of Inspeetor Thomas, with
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wing yambliny in his house. It appeared that on the
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ious Thursday aficrnoon the Inspector walked in, and
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» HORIG men plaviny at ' pitels and toss," the landlady
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"ing <n atthe tine, but the landlord was away from
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he. The offence was adinitted, and a fine of 2s. 6d.
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8. OXUCLSES Was Eifiicted,
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bitheti. VESICLES IN TRE Puvlic STREETS. - At the
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ell, on Teeslay, befure J. Armitage, Esq., a farm-
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wns, named John Bell, was charzed, on the informa-
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i of . Ag tag-Insixctor Thomas, with leaving his cart
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1 Hovses standing in Nerth rate for a longer period
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. Was necessary, without any cn? to attend to them.
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- that the defendant hid drawn his rebicle t»
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three-aunnes et and repaired to a public honse for
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Me te s of au hour to regale himself in the mean-
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R cartons Seok reaarked, with justice, that many of
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bc Cots neat tiike habit of bctaking themselves to
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it Charen 2s ond ' thst cruelly leavir g the animals under
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ots ty the publ" in the public strcets, a course as dan-
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Den aH "Ae 28 3t was un'eeling on the part of these
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leaded gait Fmitagee suitebly cautioned tre defendant.
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wiry fy.) Se and ordered him to pay a mitigated
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"y uf 2s, Od. cud Ck pense.
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p
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dersfield were liable,
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f caused in the Guildhall, on Tuesda:
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Titates. - Mr Modey, eeteeter oe
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friends, has sseureéd 'thy' earns of oe
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peridrinéts, Mr, dnd Mis: Diflon fur the ensuing i#ebk,
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th tilt, on f We meni y
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3 o
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Mr. Ba: i" def a ios the evidence sddused it
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ure at Wilb: ve pasted through
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ey chal bar wi coils $0 some boul Ses by. Womers-
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copmeauintly, ertanded toll, But Wilby said he had no
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money end cduld iict dy, He then demanded the de-
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fendant's name, but this also was refused. Mr. Barker, in
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cross-examination, elicited that in crossing the road at the
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point in question, parties with vehicles were not liable to
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t all portion wie oles coming from Hud-
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D € then objected on the ground that
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the-coshs were going tohouses which were paivaio property,
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e roads to which were repaired by the owners ; and also
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on the ground of the chain bar being within the limits of
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the Huddersfield Improvement Act, which act, in its 50th
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clause, stated-' That no person snall, in respect of any
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property without the limits of this act, be subject or liable
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to repair or contribute to the repair of any street, road
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or highway within the limits of this act." And, in clause
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13, the limits of the act are given as being "within a
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radius of 1200 yards from the spot where the old cross for-
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merly stood in the market-place," He then called Mr.
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Fletcher, surveyor of Fartown, who stated that the Im-
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provement Commissioners repaired the road some twenty
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yards beyond the bar in question. Mr. Joshua, Hobson
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clerk to the Board of Works, was also called, who gave
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similar evidence. Mr. Armitage, the commissioners' gur-
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veyor, likewise stated that the commissioners boundary ex-
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tended from thirty to forty yards beyond the bar. The
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magistrates dismissed the case, remarking that it was clear
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that toll could not legally be demanded at the above chain-
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bar, which decision is of some importance to the town.
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A Disciple or Baccnus. - At the Guild- on Tucs-
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day last, before J. Armitage, Esq., an old ora ss Jo-
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seph Stott was charged by Hutchinson, the Longroyd
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Bridge Constable, with being drunk on the night of Sun-
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day, the 28th ultimo, at Paddock Foot. It appeared that
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the old man had been ordered out of a public house by the
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constable, but, in abusive language, refused to comply with
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the request, and in addition, insisted on the "man of au-
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thority" doing his duty, threatening, as a matter of course,
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that Senin Pescondings would follow. Hutchinson, no-
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thing loth, do his duty, and the result was, Stott found
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himself in charge, and was now called upon for his defence.
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The defendant now admitted that on the night in question
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he was a little beerified, upon which Mr. Armitage said
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that, as the offenee was committed without the boundary
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of the Improvement Commissioners, the lowest fine the
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Bench could inflict was 5s. and expenses, or, in case that
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was not paid, a few hours sojourn in the stocks, and a trip
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to Wakefield House of Correction afterwards. Stott re-
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plied, "I think, your worship, that's too much for a bit of
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a doo like that," (laughter.) The defendant being an old
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man, and having hitherto borne a good character was ulti-
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mately disc on a promise not to offend again, and
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qis:, Jus ;
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Biba, havea ad Joseph Wilby Sith case, aleclans of
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chaincbar, ga Fartown, without payit toll, on Mendes
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, apped of
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and
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harged,
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on condition that he paid the expenses,
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Wo STOLE THE Meal?considerable merriment was
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, in the hearing of a
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charge of assault, preferred by one Thomas Knight, against
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his own brother-in-law (a true Stalybridge boy), named
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Silas Wilkinson. The plaintiff stated, that one evening the
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previous week he was coming from his work at Brown Mill,
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when he was met by the defendant, when he said, " What
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are all these tales thou hast been telling about me?" Plain-
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tiff denied that he had told any, whereupon the Lancashire
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man commenced using a number of coarse and violent
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epithets towards him, among other things, cha: ing the
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plaintiff with owing him Is. for an "ale shot." This was
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repudiated, and the result was, as plaintiff alleged, a blow
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from defendant, which knocked him down. For the de-
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fence this plain unvarmished tale was considerably varied,
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and to a certain extent the tables turned against the plain-
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tiff. Silus said, that two years ago he came into this
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neighbourhood from Stalybridge, and lived in the same
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house with the plaintiff, who, at that time, had a daughter
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in service ina public house in Huddersfield. On one occa
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sion, when the girl was visited by her father at her place
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of service, she contrived to smuggle away some meal,
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which she gave to her father, and he brought it home with
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him. Other articles, according to the statement of Silus,
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found their way into their joint lodging in a similar manner,
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and being apprehensive that he might get himself into
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trouble, the Stalybridge man left their joint dwelling and
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set up housekeeper on his own account. Since that time
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neither party had spoken of the other in very brotherly
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terms to third parties, and when they met on the evening
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in question the Lancashire blood of Silus displayed itself,
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and he challenged Knight with having made statements
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injurious to his character. The wordy war waxed warm
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and furious, sundry peculations were bandied about on
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both sides, and among other things Silus demanded the
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shilling he had paid for his brother-in-law at the public-
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house. Knight repudiated the debt, and gave the defendant
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the lie direct, when the Lancashire man, being the more
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courageous of the two, struck at the plaintiff, missed his
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head, but knocked off his hat. Believing in the truth of
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the old adage, "hethat fights and runs away will live to
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fight some other day," Knight took to his heels, and
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scampered off at full s into a public-house hard by, to
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which place he was fohowed by Silus, where they called
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each other in real oldsaxon language, tothe nosmallamuse-
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ment of the company. The most suspicions feature of the
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case was the circumstance that, at the time the meal was
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purloined from the public-housz, these two parties kept a
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pig in partnership. The Bench considered the case of
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assault made out, but owing to both parties standing in a
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very questionable position as to character, on their own
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sh wing, the charge was dismissed on the defendant pay-
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ing the expenses.
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CHARGE OF COTTING Unperwwoon. - At the Guildhall,
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Huddersfield, en Tuesday last, before J. Armitage and
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B. N. R. Batty, Esqrs., three men named William Broad-
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ley, Thomas Walker, and George Swift, were charged
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with having committed malicious damage by cutting under-
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wood in Crowroyd Wood, belonging to R. H. Beaumont,
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Esq., of Whiteley Hall) Mr. W. Barker prosecuted.
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The defence was conducted by Mr. J. I. Freeman. The
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principal witness for the prosecution was a man named
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ichard Hill, of Royd Hall, who stated that on the evening
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of the 18th ult., about seven o'clock, he was going by the
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side of the wood in question, when he heard a crash, and
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saw Swift cutting wood with a knife, the latter of whom
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ran away on seeing the witness. Hill also deposed that in
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a few minutes afterwards he saw Broadley in the act of
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cuttang wood, which he began to gather up. The only
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evidence against Walker was his being in the company of
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the other two defendants. In cross-examination by Mr.
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Freeman, Hill admitted that he had been several times in
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Wakefield Prison, and that Swift and Walker had been
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instremental in sustaining a criminal prosecution against
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his own brother some time ago, but denied that the present
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charge had beer preferred im consequence. From the
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testimony of three other witnesses it was elicited that the
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wood had been cut in the place spoken to by Hill; the
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damage was laid at 1s. 6d., and that the three defendants
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were seen near the wood about the time alleged in the
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present charge. - Mr. Freeman, in opening the defence,
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asked to have Walker set at liberty, a course the Bench de-
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clined accedjmg tv until the case had been fully closed in
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reference to all the defendants. Mr. Freeman then pro-
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ceeded to comment in severe terms on the character of the
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witness Hill, whose testimony, he maintained, could not
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be relied on, and called a brother of one of the defendants,
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named Benjamin Broadley, who stated that on the
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19th ult., (the day after the alleged stick-cutting process,)
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Hill came into his brother's chamber, and said "I want
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to go and swear that these two chaps (meaning Swift and
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Walker) cut these sticks, and then we two shall be clear."
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This the defendant, Broadley, deelined to do, alleging that
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he had notseen them eut sticks, and Hill then made
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answer that he woukk swear they had, and that he
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(broadley) might swear what the d-l he liked. 'the
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Bench considered the case proved in the case of Swift and
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Broadley, and fined them in the mitiguted penalty of 1s. 6d,
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and costs. Walker was discharged. -
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APPREHENSION AT BRENTWOOD OF PARTIFS CHARGED
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with A MURDER IN IRELAND. - A few days since, an Irish
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policeman enl'sted in the East India Company's service at
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Wasley, in this cou ty, an had not been long in the barracks
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when, whilst on parade, he recognised two men whom he
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knew as the murdcrers of a fellow-policeman,
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M 'quin, in Ireland. The discoverer said nuthing to any
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one upen the subject, but wrote to the author'tics in
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Ireland; anda letter was on Saturday last received by
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Colunzl Hay, by whomthe accused were given into custody.
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-Ekssex Herald.
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THe Extraorprxary Equestrian Pe\t. - We last
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week gave the particulars of a memb2r of the University of
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Oxford riding from that city to London and back in 1
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minute unéer five hours, winning by more than an hou~, and
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we now find the followiag in an Oxtord paner in reference
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to the subiect. " Whatever cause the author may have
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to pride himself on his feat, the Vice-Chancellor of the
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. Uncrersity has not been of opinion that the ri ler was duly
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ee himself for his acajemical pursvits, and has
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fore granted him leave of xbsence, or, in other words,
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' rusticated' him ter a year."
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Tie Tou: C i -turodrant Bootes 1 The
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ee - ee x 1 Ni At the
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gait o Baburday, ist, before J. Brook and George
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Ys :
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. GOMMISSIONERS. - Last Nien, -
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'the"tisual génerél] mecting of the Board was held lest
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evening, (F }). in the -Commissioners'-rooms, Buxtons
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 : The owwy members of the. Board were
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resent :
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.mesars, Jere nee n, W: Pi nd, Riley, Thomas
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Hayley, James » W. Moore, E. wood, P. Cros-
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-John Brook; Mallinson, J
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A oseph Beaumont, jun.,
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'henry Charlesworth, and John Firth, as also Mr. Clough,
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(law Clerk to the Commissioners;) 'and Mr. J: Hobson,
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(clerk of the Works:) -.. ;
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eonkequenes of the unavoidable absence of Joseph
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Brovk, Esq., (tha Chairman of the Commnntissioners,) Mr.
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Jere Kaye was tmanimously called to the chair,
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The Propose Town IMPROVEMENTS. - The Law CLERK
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informed the Board that he had written to Mr Lock, seek-
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ing an interview with that gentleman on behalf of the sub-
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committee appointed at the last meeting, on the subject of
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the proposed alterations in the town near the George Hotel,
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and received an answer from Mr. Lock, who e:
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himself willing to meet the deputation in London, where
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he is at present detained, but suggested, as he would
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shortly be in Huddersfield, whether it would not be desir-
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able to defer the conference until his arrival. The general
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body of commissioners concurred in the latter suggestion,
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as it would be a saving of expense, and moreover it seemed
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to be the general wish that the interview should take place
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on the spot, in case a reference to localities were needed.
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Watch COMMITTEE. - Mr. Hopson read the minutes of
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this committee, which expressed regret that ill-health had
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caused the resignation of Superintendent Cheesborough,
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and recommended. that Inspector John Thomas be ap-
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pointed Superintendent Constable in his stead ; and also
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the appointment of Day Constable Townend to the office
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of sergeant, at a salary of 21s. per~week, both appoint-
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ments being held during good behaviour. The committee
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also reported that, in consequence of an application from
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F. D. Fenton, Esq., they had ordered that three officers
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should attend the grand cricket match, each day, in the
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fair week, under the superintendence of the Chief Constable
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In answer to a question from Commissioner Firth,
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the CHAIRMAN said these three men would not
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be taken from the day but night force, the latter of whom
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would, of course, perform extra duty, and for whose
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services the managers of the ericket ground would have to
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pay. At a subsequent stage of the proceedings, on the con-
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firmation of minutes, Commissioner FIRTH said on reflection
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he did not approve of these three men being taken
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from the night watch for such a purpose [commissioner
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Moore : In order to promote a right down national sport.]
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inasmuch as they would have to do double duty. [the
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Chairman : Yes, they will] and he could not but smile at
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a man being called upon to do duty by day and by night.
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-The CHAIRMAN said the matter had been maturely con-
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sidered by the committee, who thought it better to thus
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employ some of the night men than leave the town on a
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fair day without the usual day officers.(hear, hear)-Com-
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missioners Crosland, Moore, and Mallinson considered that
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the committee had exercised a wise discretion in arranging
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to send officers to this great match, where, beyond ques-
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tion, a great portion of the Fair-comers would certainly
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be attracted. - The proceedings of this committee, includ-
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ing the appointment of the two officers above-named, were
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511 uently confirmed.
431:
PAVVING COMMITTEE. - The minutes of this committee
432:
were also read by Mr. Hopson, which stated that a letter
433:
had been received from George Armitage, Esq., complain-
434:
ing of the present rate of per centage, &c., charged by the
435:
momissioners, for superintending private improvements
436:
and other works, &c., of private parties, wish the view of
437:
inducing the committee to consider the propriety of reduc-
438:
ing the same. The committee had requested that Mr. Ar-
439:
mnitage would bring the matter before the Commissioners.
440:
The committee also reported that they had given instruc-
441:
tions to Mr. Armytage, their surveyor, not to approve ofany
442:
building erections in any street, unless the said street had
443:
been previously properly levelled. - Mr. Eastwoop said he
444:
believed that the committee would endeavunr to vindicate
445:
the course they had pursued in reference to Mr. George
446:
Armitage's application, but, as Mr. Armitage was not pre-
447:
sent, and no member of the Board appeared to have beon
448:
entrusted with a motion on his behalf, it was suggested
449:
that the matter must necessarily fall to the ground as a
450:
dropped motion. - Mr. Hobson explained that he had re-
451:
ceived a letter from Mr. Armitage, in which that gentle-
452:
man stated that domestic affliction prevented him being
453:
present, but-in case-the-commissioners still adhered to
454:
their former resolution he was wishful: that the ma'-
455:
ter should fall to the ground. - After some further dis-
456:
cussion on the point the matter dropped. -The Law
457:
CLERK explained the course it was necessary for the
458:
surveycr to the commissioners to pursue in refe-ence to
459:
fixing the levels of the different streets, viz., by fixing a
460:
mark in a particular place, from which the levels of all
461:
erections must be worked. It was remark:2d that Mr.
462:
Armytage had been already instructed by tha committee
463:
to pursue that' course, and that he was doing so at evcry
464:
spare interval of time he had......commissioner Eastwood
465:
remarked that the committee thought they were within the
466:
power of their act when they passed the resolution in refer-
467:
ence to levelling the streets before any buildings were
468:
erected, and they had adopted that course in order to
469:
avoid dilemmas and mistakes as to the level on the part of
470:
persons crecting premises in these new streets. The con-
471:
uence of disrczgarding this precantion was referred to in
472:
reference to St. Paul's-street and Ramsden-street, which
473:
were without any proper level or drain, and the houses
474:
in that part were described as consequently in a very
475:
wretched state...... Commissioner MOORE said that the com-
476:
mittee weve anxious to pursue a legal course, but the state
477:
of St. Paul's-street was most, discreditable, and it was a
478:
matter of regret that the agents of Sir John Ramsden still
479:
neglected, although frequently applied to, to issue the
480:
roper notices. The committee had waited for the notices
481:
ing given, out of pure delicacy to Si- John's agents, but
482:
it had now become a matter of so great inconvenience
483:
that the question resolved itself into one of great importance,
484:
while in tact all the blame was thrown.on the shoulders of
485:
the Commissioners when in reality they were nor at all to
486:
blame. They had therefore ordered the Surveyor not to
487:
pass any plans for ereetions im streets where the necessary
488:
conditions had not been complied with, iu order that they
489:
might have a pressure on the Ramsden Trustees to prevent
490:
any further delay of the necessary notices. ......several com-
491:
missioners complained of a similar state of things in Zet-
492:
land Street, Wentworth Street, New North ad, and
493:
other parts of the town, the Chairman ultimately remark-
494:
ing that in case the commissioners in future refused to give
495:
parties a power tv build in those streets referred to then
496:
the Ramsden Trustees would soon fmd a remedy for it
497:
Loans oF Money. - The Finance Committee reported
498:
that they had received scveral offers of money in answer to
499:
their advertisement for a loan of £5000, one of which they
500:
cussion ensued, some of the commissioners being of opinion.
501:
that the interest in the instance recommended by the com-
502:
missioners was too high, and not so eligible as another
503:
offer made. It was subsequently agreed that the Law
504:
Clerk should place himself in communication with the party
505:
whose offer was recommended, with the view to the reduc-
506:
tion of the rate of interest thereon.
507:
THE Gas QUESTION. - Commissioner MOORE said," that
508:
as the originator of the motion on this subject, which stood
509:
next on the books, he would state, that so soon as he
510:
learned that their respected chairman would be absent at
511:
that meeting, he at once made up his mind not to intro-
512:
duce this question in his absence, for as it was a matter
513:
whick hivetved so many scrious consequences that it required
514:
the serious consideration of every commissioner. In the
515:
absence of their chainnan, therefore, he should not feel
516:
adopt this course out of any disr t to their present
517:
chairman, (hear, hear,) but, all things considered, he was
518:
not sorry that the matter was to be postponed for 2 short
519:
time. It was a question so deeply interesting to the town
520:
at large, that a fortnight's further consideration of it would
521:
do no harm, for he was sorry to say that some of the com-
522:
missionerg were not ripe for the subject. (cries of "chair.")
523:
If he was out of order he would of course say no more
524:
than that he was actuated purely by a public feeling-
525:
(hear, hear)-he had no private interez' ¢iygeby to serve-
526:
nay, more, he knew that the step £<.@8 now taking
527:
would be at his ewn cost-(hear, hear)-'ut so long as
528:
he was @ commissioncr he would do his duty, and as he
529:
knew that Bis own term of office would soon be at an end,
530:
he was resolved that such a motion should be discussed be-
531:
fore he left that honourable board, He was quite satisfied
532:
that some of his brother Commissioners were not yet ripe
533:
to make one observation in reference t) their finances.
534:
There had an e runeous impression got abroad wi:h respect
535:
to their funds. even among the commissioners. One of
536:
their board had told him that they had old. debts enough
537:
without contracting new ones. He (the speaker) should like
538:
to know what they were. He know of none.except th: s¢
539:
wh'cli had been contra:ted to ba repaid in 30 years. He
540:
knew not, either, of any enormous. expenditure. True,
541:
they hid horruwed £5,(40 at 43 por cent.. but then they
542:
had got fv2 per ceat. for ié back azain, and; therefore, he-
543:
emtendsd tha' the more- money the ¢ mm'ssione:s bor-
544:
rowe1 the better it would-be forthe ratepryers.. (hear,
545:
hear.) He wished to correct those erroneo.s impressions,
546:
and to check those' assertion: wherein it- wa; suid
547:
that ther were going on at an extravagant rate.
548:
He considered that tne affairs of the town were in
549:
"the han
550:
 : wherewith to make
551:
recommended for the approval of the Board. - A long dis-
552:
secure in discussing theis important subject. He did not
553:
hands of a deliberative
554:
anxjous-to promote the interests of the town, at as little
555:
cost to the ratepayeos as le. It was wrong to
556:
masa that they were
557:
'9
558:
class of individuals, who were
559:
when, in reality, they. were merely borrowi
560:
wit rivate improvements, out of which the
561:
commussionérs would theniselves make a handsome profit.
562:
It was subsequently agreed that the qnestion should : be
563:
adjourned until that day fortnight, on the suggestion of
564:
Cominissioner Crosland, a meeting to be then specially
565:
convened for that purpose.
566:
A vacanty was declared in the Board in
567:
the eonttinued absence, beyond the
568:
c consequence of
569:
n time specified in the act,
570:
of Mr, Abraham Hirst, and it was resolved that the vacancy
571:
should be filled up at. the special meeting above alluded to.
572:
Several other matters were brought before the Board,
573:
but we regret that our limits have compelled us materially
574:
to abridge the proceedings. In future we hope to have
575:
completed arrangements by which the proceedings of the
576:
Board may be' reported at greater lengtli in our columns.
577:
Lymmincton Enkction. - The nomntination of candidates
578:
took place on Monday, and on Tuesday the polling com-
579:
monced. The combatants were Mr. Hutchins, (free-trader)
580:
and Mr. Stewart, (eraieotioniat,} Mr. Stewart resigned at
581:
3 p. m. and the former was consequently declared duly
582:
elected. This is consideredatriumph by the free-trade party.
583:
THE GORHAM Controversy. - A long and protracted
584:
correspondence between the Rev. W. Maskell, of Exeter,
585:
and the Archbishop of Canterbury, has just been published.
586:
Mr. Maskell endeavours to elicit categorical answers to five
587:
dogmatical propositions concerning baptismal regeneration,
588:
and the other leading points of dispute between the Trac-
589:
tarians and Evangelicals, The Archbishop replies with
590:
much firmness, good temper, and with a considerable de-
591:
gree of explicitness. Hs. Grace's replies have an evident
592:
leaning to the Evangelical side, but he purposely avoids
593:
giving a particular or detailed judgment, to do which, he
594:
asserts, he has no authority. r. Maskell, however,
595:
pushes the point yet further, when the Archbishop sa
596:
that he (MR. Maskell) is to preach "according to Holy
597:
Writ," and advises him "to enquire whether in the exer-
598:
cise of his ministry, he had not been in the habit of paying
599:
too much attention and attributing too much authority to
600:
something else, rather than that on which they could alone
601:
depend-the Word of God."...... The Bishop of Gloucester
602:
and Bristol has replied to the address presented to him by
603:
a great number of his clergy on the Gorham case, stating
604:
that he agrees with them " in thinking that the constitu-
605:
tion of the present court of appeal, in matters ecclesiastical,
606:
unsatisfactory." He states that " all the members of the
607:
English Episcopate are at this time in anxious deliberation
608:
on the subject," and desires prayers that they may " come
609:
to such a conclusion as may obviate what is at present ano-
610:
malous and objectionable, and may promote the peace and
611:
unity of our beloved church."
612:
SINGULAR CASSE OF CHILD MURDER. - A constable,
613:
named John Hawkins, living at Heage, near Belper, hav-
614:
ing received an anonymous letter, setting forth that a young
615:
woman, named Elizabeth Vicars, who resided with her
616:
mother in a small cottage, had been confined, and that the
617:
two parties were suspected of having murdered the child,
618:
immediately went to the house, and having made known
619:
his business in calling, was told by the mother that the
620:
report was groundless. He, however, apprehended the
621:
daughter and mother, and on the former being examined
622:
by Mr. Allen, a surgeon, he pronounced her to have been
623:
delivered of a child. ae constable then proceeded to
624:
search the cottage, and finding that a ing stone
625:
had been rovontly removed, the discove: ror tee Moonee
626:
murder flashed across his mind, and he forthwith took the
627:
stone up, and found the body of a newly-born female child,
628:
wrapped up in an old black apron, the legs being doubled
629:
up under its body, and the latter squeezed quite flat. The
630:
constable found concealed in the cottage a sum in gold and
631:
silver, amounting to £53 3s. In another hole a quantity of
632:
copper money was found, which has not been counted, but
633:
which weighed 37lb., and in another place he found
634:
£10 9s. 53d. Where they got the money from is a mystery.
635:
Both prisoners occasionally went out i The entire
636:
surface of the scalp was a mass of bruises, and black from
637:
effused blood. The-injuries were inflicted during the life of
638:
the child. A conversation between the two prisoners,
639:
which had been overheard in the lock-up, proved that both
640:
were guilty. The jury returned a verdict of " Wilful mur-
641:
der" against both, and they were fully committed for trial.
642:
. 'freaks oF Mk. WOMBWELL'S ELEPHANT. - On Thurs-
643:
day, Mr. Wombvwell's elephant caused some consternation
644:
at Castle Edwarl Colliery, near Sunderland. Symptoms
645:
of an outbreak had appeared on his journey from Hartle.
646:
pool, inasmuch as some difficulty was experienced in pre-
647:
venting him doinz injury to the horses that helped him to
648:
draw the caravan. nce loosened, however, from harness,
649:
the huge animal instantly cleared his way of horses, cara-
650:
van, and every obstruction, animate and inanimate. The
651:
pitmen's henroosts, and such like, were crushed like egz-
652:
shells, to the evident consternation of the bystanders, but
653:
it became a task of serious difficulty to catch and secure
654:
the animal. Ropes were passed around his trunk and legs,
655:
stones were thrown, and guns fired at him, but for some
656:
time with no other effect than to intensify his exasperation.
657:
At last he was thrown down, and then, finding himself
658:
foiled, he calmly allowed himself to be led to his den,
659:
where, throughout the evening, he rang his bell for nuts
660:
and gingerbread with the greatest good humour. The
661:
next morning, on removing to Seaham Harbour, the same
662:
scene was repeated, but mingled with greater cause of
663:
alarm. When brought to be harnessed, as usual, he gave
664:
proof that he would much rather break his caravan to
665:
pieces than draw it. The test alarm prevailed amonest
666:
the observers, lest some of the caravans should be so da-
667:
maged as to allow animals perhaps even more prone to do
668:
mischief than the elephant to escape. 'although this was
669:
nearly the case on one or two occasions, yet nothing so se-
670:
rious came to pass, and the premises were finally cleared of
671:
the strange visitor and his companions.
672:
IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.
673:
(continued from the Sixth Page.)
674:
HOUSE OF LORDS.
675:
Thursday, May 2.
676:
BIRTH OF A Prince. - The Marquis of LANSDOWNE
677:
moved an address to Her Majesty congratulating her on
678:
the birth of another Prince, and conveying the assurance
679:
that every accession to Her Majesty's domestic happiness
680:
afforded sincere satisfaction to the House....... After a few
681:
words from the Duke of RICHMOND, expressing the entire
682:
concurrence of allon his side of the House in the sentiments
683:
to which the Marquis of Lansdowne had given utterance,
684:
the address was put, and carried remine contradicente.
685:
AGRICULTURAL DISTRESS. - The Duke of Ricuwonp
686:
then presented a petition from Morayshire, complaining of
687:
agricultural distress, along with nearly 100 others, and
688:
called the attention of Lord Grey to the fact that in one
689:
Northumberland paper no less than 60 advertisements were
690:
to be found referring to farms on which stock was about to
691:
be sold. He reiterated his declaration that the British
692:
yeoman would be exterminated unless the country returned
693:
to Protectionist principles....... Earl GREY said that this
694:
was the season of the year at which the removal of tenants
695:
from their farms took place in the north, and this cause
696:
was a sufficient explanation of the number of sales adver-
697:
tised. It appeared also, from a letter dated in September,
698:
1844, and published in a Sussex paper, that in that year,
699:
under protection, sales of stock on 70 farms were advertised
700:
in one paper, so that by the argument of the Duke of
701:
Richmond the state of the agricultural interest was worse
702:
in 1844 than in 1850. In this opinion, the real weight
703:
whicl: had broken the neck of the British farmer was the
704:
miscalled protection under which he had been oppressed.
705:
The Duke of ARGYLE thought that undue importance
706:
had been given to an expression of Lord Lansdowne, to the-
707:
effect that free trade was an experiment ; for even admit-
708:
ting it to be an experiment, it was not one which: could be
709:
easily reversed. In his opinion, the present state of things.
710:
was exceptional, and it was impossible to argue as-to the-
711:
permanent depression of agricultural produce fiom existing -
712:
prices....... After some further discussion in which several:
713:
noble lords joined, the matter dropped. - Their Lordships
714:
havi disposed of some routine. business, the louse
715:
adjourned.
716:
HOUSE OF COMMONS.
717:
Phursday, May-2.. -
718:
Duty on ATTORNEYS' CERTIFICATES. - The debate on
719:
the motion for-leave to bring in a.bill:to-repeal the annual
720:
duty on. attorneys' certificates (adjourned on the 26th of
721:
t February) was resumed; by Sir-F' Trresicer wh
722:
fur this discussion, and consequently he was most anxious ») : ee supported
723:
the motion...... The CHANCELLO® of the EXCHEQUER resis-
724:
ted the repeal of the tax, remarking that it was one
725:
'which he could' not relimquish without sacrificing more
726:
revenue than he-ought to do....... After a further brief dis-
727:
cussion, tle House divided, when the motion was. carried
728:
(against the- Government) by 155 against 136, and leave
729:
was given to bring in the bill. .
730:
County Cour?s Extension Brilt. - On the order of the
731:
day for going into committee on the bill, Me. KEOGH moved
732:
an instruction to the committce to extend its operation
733:
to Iretand:...... Sir G. Grey said, the Government were
734:
preparing " bill of consolidasiin, and when it came before:
735:
the House, this question, ts tite principle of which he was
736:
not hostile, migh; be mora:fitly considered Myr, K.gosu.
737:
thereupon withdrew. Kia. motion, and the House weat into
738:
committee upon the bill, which, a%e: several amendiucats
739:
had been made; was rep:
740:
. LATEST INTELLIGENCE.
741:
over head: and ears in .
742:
money
743:
' BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH.
744:
Lonpon, Friday Nicxt.
745:
dates are-Bombay, April 3d ; Calcutta, March 25th ;
746:
China, March 7th. India is quiet, except the Peshawm
747:
frontier ; another expedition there is contemplated. The
748:
Chinese piratical fleet has been completely demolished by a
749:
British steamer. -
750:
Bombay. - The import market extremely dull, and some-
751:
what lower for the little business done. ports also dull.
752:
Freights very depressed. Rate to Liverpool, £3 first class ;
753:
£2 TBS. second class ; and to London £3.
754:
Catcurta. - Imports very quiet, and in some cases lower.
755:
In exports, activity subsided, waiting further advices.
756:
Freights lower and little doing. Bank of Bengal has raised
757:
rate for loans and discount 1 per cent.
758:
WEST INDIA AND PACIFIC MAILS.
759:
The " Tay" steamer arrived at. Southampton this morn-
760:
ing at Ten. She brings 1,000,000 dollars and 2,500 ounces
761:
or silver.
762:
Jamaica, APRIL 7. - Want of rain much felt. No change
763:
in business. Sugar dull at 13s. to 16s. Coffee declined.
764:
TRINIDAD, APRIL 6. - Sugar crop proceeding rapidly.
765:
Crop expected to be less than last year.
766:
BARBADOES, APRIL 8. - Scarcity of rain. Crop ex-
767:
pected about same as last year. England has concluded
768:
a treaty with Costa Rica.
769:
CLOSING PRICES. - YESTERDAY AFTERNOON, 4 p.m.
770:
THe Funps. - Consols for Account, 95} to 953; Money
771:
ditto; Three and a quarter per Cent., 963 to 973; Ex-
772:
chequer Bills, 67 to 70.
773:
Suares. - London and North Western, 101 to 1013;
774:
Midland, 313 to 32; North Staffordshire, 103 to 10} dis. ;
775:
South Eastern and Dover, 13} to 13}; Ditto 4 per Cent.
776:
reduced, 43 to 48; Caledonian, 74 to 73; Ditto Pref., 5} to
777:
52; Counties, to a; Great Northern, 16} to
778:
153; Great Western, 504 to 513; Midland Halves, 2Y to
779:
283; York and North Midland, 143 to 15.
780:
Consols done to-day at 96, but towards the close of busi-
781:
ness they declined, m consequence of the foreign news
782:
received during the afternoon not being considered favour-
783:
able. Not much business done.
784:
Less doing in Railways than in any day during the last
785:
fortnight. Market closes tiat, generally. Midland Halves
786:
lower upon the call.
787:
NEWMARKET RACES, May 3.
788:
HANDICAP. NEWMARKET STAKES,
789:
Harkaway, filly ............ 1 Cambro... 1
790:
Gurdam ........cecceeeee eee 2 Nutshell 2.0.20... 2
791:
Utrecht ....00 ee 3
792:
Won by a length. '
793:
London CORRN MARKET. - Arrivals of English wheat,
794:
scanty, but of foreign large. Attendance of buyers small.
795:
Trade slow at Monday's terms. No change in fiour. Top
796:
market sold steadily at previous prices. Barley of geod
797:
quality supported previous rates. Inferior kinds of foreign
798:
moved off slowly at about Monday's terms. No change in
799:
malt. Peas and beans met a limited demand at previous
800:
rices. Good English oats in small supply and brought
801:
Tate rates, but for foreign demand continues dull and Mon-
802:
day's terms scarcely supported. No change in seeds and
803:
little doing. English white wheat, 38s. to 47s.; Ditto
804:
red ditto, 35s. to 41s. English :-Wheat 2,140, barley 750,
805:
oats 1,020, malt 2,650, flour 3,310. Foreign :- Wheat
806:
17,540, barley 8,760, oats 38,610.
807:
LIVERPOOL CORN MARKET, May 3. - There has heen a
808:
good attendance to-day, and a steady demand for Wheat
809:
at the full prices of Tuesday, but in a few instances ls. per
810:
70lbs. advance was paid. Flour has also met a fair inquiry
811:
at extreme prices. Oats, Oatmeal, Beans and Peas are
812:
each the turn dearer. Barley and Malt unchanged. In-
813:
dian Corn in good request, but without change in value.
814:
LIVERPOOL COTTON MARKET, May 3. - Sales to-day :
815:
12,000 Bales: half on speculation. Sales of the week :
816:
90,640 Bales, including 37,520 on speculation, and 4610 for
817:
export. Prices 4 to } above last week.
818:
SMITHFIELD CATTLE MARKET, Lonpdon, May 3d. -
819:
Beasts, 919; Sheep and Lambs, §,610; Calves, 403:
820:
Pigs, 275. Beet, 2s. 2d., 3s. 2d. ;, Mutton, 3s., 3s. ud. ;
821:
Veal, 2s. 8d., 4s.; Pork, 3s. 2d., 4s. 2d. ; Lamb, 5s., 5e. 81.
822:
Holland, Beasts, 70; Sheep, 240; Calves, 217. Nortotk
823:
and Suffolk Beasts, 300. Scotch Beasts, 240. A moderate
824:
supply of Beasts. Trade very dull at Monday's Prices.
825:
A few Scots realized 3s. 4d. ; Lambs and Calves sold slowly ;
826:
Sheep out of the wool made more than 3s. 1d.
827:
AWFUL TRAGEDY-THREE PERSONS KILLED AND Svl-
828:
CIDE OF THE MURDERER. - Stafford and the neighbourheed
829:
were on Wednesday alarmed by a report, which turned
830:
out quite correct, of a most tragical event having taken
831:
lace at Ingestre, the seat of Earl Talbot. It appears thot
832:
r. Yarker, head gamekeeper to Earl Talbot, who was re-.
833:
covering from an attack of delirium tremens, was attended
834:
by Walter Murray, the. n who was placed in charze of
835:
him by the advice of his medical adviser, Mr. Waddell. of
836:
Stafford, who had repeatedly given instructions that any
837:
weapon with which he could ibly do any injury shonl:l
838:
be cautiously kept from him, and also that he should he
839:
strictly watched It appears, however, that Murray, who
840:
is an under-keeper, about six o'clock on Tuesday evenin;::,
841:
incautiously allowed Yarker to take out a gun, in company
842:
with him, for the of shooting jackdaws. After -
843:
they had procceded about a mile from the house Yar'tur
844:
shot Murray with a bullet : Yarker then returned iiom",
845:
leaving his victim dead in a kind of tower or temple. Tae
846:
servant girl was in the kitchen whea Yarker arrive there,
847:
taking tea, with an infant in her arms; he opened ine
848:
door, and shot her dead through the head, the child falli.g
849:
unhurt to the ground. Yarker's sister, who is the widow
850:
of a medical gentleman, was in the small apartment, n+
851:
more than three yards from him; he levelled the gun xt
852:
her, and she shifting her position he lowered his gun fr. "
853:
his shoulder ; again levelled it and fired ; she distinctly - +
854:
the flash, and immediately moved her head and escaped
855:
with two shots in the face; Yarker then ran from 't'e
856:
house and escaped into the wood with his gun unloade:.
857:
His wife, who was in the yard, followed him. In abou: tn
858:
minutes from this time Yarker's s'ster heard the report." f
859:
a gun, and in about two minutes af erwards the report " f
860:
another. Mr. Waddell, the surgeon, was immediately sort
861:
for from Stafford, and on his arrival at the scene forrd
862:
Yarker and his wife lying about five yards distant fic m
863:
each other, Mrs. Yarker having been shot through tre
864:
heart, and the upper part of Yarker's head' entirely blo n
865:
off, taking with it nearly the whole of the-contents of t' e
866:
skull.
867:
VARIATIONS IN THE TEMPERATURE.
868:
Recorded by J. B. LOMBARDENI, Market-place.
869:
Temperature by self-registering Thermometer,
870:
COLDEST NIGHTS.
871:
Night previous to
872:
Janbary 7th, 1850, at 20 deg., being 12 deg. of Frest.
873:
», 1dth, 9 ldey., ,,. lider. ,,
874:
» 18th, 4, Ilideg., ,, lbdeg. ,,
875:
March 27th, 3 2ldeg., ,, 11 deg. -
876:
9 28th, yx. 20-deg., ,, 42 deg.. "
877:
NOTICES TO CORRESPONDENTS.
878:
nr
879:
"' ANTI-STICK" complains that he has nearly had one of his
880:
eyes knocked out by one of those "little" young gentie-
881:
men who, through fashion or x love of singularity, per-
882:
ambulate our principal streets with huge walking-sticks
883:
in their hands.. We can suggest no remedy for the evif
884:
save a disregard ef its practitioners, and a careful leck
885:
out on behalf of " Anti-Stick" and his friends,
886:
MARRIAGES.
887:
On the 1st inst., at the- Parish Church, Wakefield, Mr.
888:
Jaines Sykes, watch maker, of this town, to Mary, eldest
889:
dexazhicr of Mr. Wm. Cuthbert. smith and farrier, Wakcfeld.,
890:
On the 24th ult., at Headingley. William Hastins+,
891:
Esq., of this town, to Anna, second daughter of Edwin.
892:
Birchall, Esq., of Burley-hill, near Leeds, -
893:
On the 28th ult., at the Parish Church, in this tow,
894:
Mr. Thoinas P. Lee, cloth-dresser, to Miss Mary Hors ',
895:
both of Huddersfield,
896:
On the 28th ult., at the Parish Chureh, Huddersfi'!,.
897:
Mr. Joe Crosland, cloth-dresser, ta Miss Erma Shaw, both.
898:
of Lindley. :
899:
On the 28th ult., at the Parish Church, in. thik town,
900:
Mr. Samuel Blakey, to Miss Catherine Bawer, both of'
901:
Hu lderstield.
902:
On the 29th ult.,.at the Pariyh. Church, Huddersfied,
903:
Mr. Joseph Shaw, cloth-dresser, of Paddock, to Miss Mary
904:
Sykes, of Hilthouse..
905:
On the 2nd@:inst., at the Parisi Church, in this town, Mr.
906:
Jobn May; of Hilihouse; t Miss Elizabeth Rhedes, of
907:
Iludderstield. ~
908:
Qu.the 2th. ult.,.at St. Mary's Church, Elland, by i e
909:
Rew. G, L, Beekwith, Mr. Joseph Hargreaves. to M s
910:
Blizabeth Hefuwoll, both of Grectland. - Oq the 3uth ui.,,
911:
ae Josephs Mitchell, to Miss Suzah Mitton, both of Gru -t.
912:
a, a he .
913:
DEATHS.
914:
-Jvuathan Eastwood, of Wooldalé, Holmiirth,

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