Huddersfield Chronicle (04/May/1850) - page 4

The following is an uncorrected OCR conversion of a newspaper page and will contain numerous errors. The text is in the Public Domain.
1:
4
2:
HUDDEESFIELD ASSOCIATION
3:
ror
4:
IMPROVING THE BREED OF PIGS AND
5:
POULTRY. ©
6:
EETABLISHED 9th BIAY, 1849.
7:
#. N.R.. BATTY, Esq., PRESIDENT. .
8:
OTIC E IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the
9:
ANNUAL MEETING of the Members of the
10:
abeve Association will be held at the Gzorcer HORTEL,
11:
Huddersfield, THIS DAY (saturpay, the 4th of May) at.
12:
'i'wo o'clock in the afternoon precisely, when the Committee
13:
Officers will be chosen for the ensuing year, tho Rules
14:
revised, and the several Prizes to be offered for Competi-
15:
tic upon, .
16:
"A fuli attendance of Members is desired.
17:
By Order. :
18:
C. 3. FLOYD, How. Sc. .
19:
Aibion-street, 4th May, 1850.
20:
N.B. - All Annual Subscribers of Five Shillings and up-
21:
wards are constituted Members ef the Association.
22:
OTWITHSTANDING the insinuations
23:
i thrown out by tnlerested parties to the contrary,
24:
A
25:
D. A. COOPER,
26:
ssures the public that he keeps a Working JEWELLER,
27:
as heretofore, upon the Premises. /
28:
Magna est veritas et prevalebit.
29:
OST, on the 23rd of Aprit, at the Ramway;
30:
Sration, a Long Drab PURSE, containing a £10
31:
Note, Five Sovereigns, and about Eight Shillings in Silver.
32:
A Reward of £3 will be paid on the same being forwarded
33:
to the Cironicie Ojice, Market Place, .
34:
COW FOUND.
35:
FHOORD, on the morning of Wednesday, the lst
36:
of May instant, a Milk COW. Any person having
37:
lost the same, and giving a description, may have it re-
38:
siwred on payment of the expenses of impounding and
39:
Keeping suci: cuw, and the means taken tu discover its
40:
owner.
41:
And NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that if the said
42:
Cow bs not owned and such expenses paid on or before the
43:
14th day of May, 1850, it will be SOLD; and the money
44:
arising fromm such sale, afer deducting the said sums and
45:
the expenses aforesaid, and all other expenses attending
46:
the impounding, advertising, keeping, and sale of such
47:
cow, will be paid ty the Huddersfield Lmprovement Com-
48:
missioners: and be by them paid on demand to the owner
49:
ef the cow so sold.
50:
Application to be made to the POLICE OFFICE, VICTORIA
51:
Srrr&eet, Huddersfield, to
52:
JOHN THOMAS, SUPERINTENDENT CONSTABLE,
53:
Hudderstield, May 3rd, 1850.
54:
LEEDS AND HARROGATE DIRECT.
55:
HE PUBLIC is respectfully informed that on
56:
and after Monpay, the 6th of May, the AMITY
57:
€0A4CH will leave the Pack Horsk HOTEL, HUPPDERS-
58:
FIZLD, at E1GHT o'clock every Morning (sundays excepted),
59:
fr HARROGATE, by way of Mill Bridge, Heckmondwike,
60:
Birstall, and Leeds: and will return from the COMMERCIAL
61:
Inn, HARROGATE, by the same Route, at Two o'clock in
62:
the Afternoon.
63:
Fares to Leeds-Outside, Is. 61. ; Inside, 2s. Fares to
64:
Harrozate-Outside, 3s. Gd. ; Inside, 5s.
65:
W. WEBSTER, Proprietor.
66:
FEXO be LET, a small FARM, at Biack Moor
67:
Foor, South Crosland, near Huddersfield, containing
68:
about 17 acres of land, late in the occupation of Mr. William
69:
Cotton.
70:
Apply to Mr. Dunderdale, Whitley Hall, near Hudders-
71:
field
72:
ell.
73:
dee be LET, ROOM and POWER, at the
74:
. Pappock MILLS, First Room 63 feet long, 31 feet
75:
wide, 1] feet high ; the Second Floor the same; the Third
76:
63 feet long, 31 feet wide, 11 feet high ; the Top Room the
77:
same, but divided by a Tenter Stone with three Tenters.
78:
The Engine, quite new, of 16 horse power, 20 horse Boiler,
79:
well supplied with good Soft Water. Wool Drying Room,
80:
dittu. Also an excellent House and Warehouse, Stabling,
81:
&e., adjoining, which may be had with the Mill if required ;
82:
the whole may be entered to immediately,
83:
For further particulars apply on the premises.
84:
The above will either be let in one Lot or in Rooms.
85:
STONY BANK, NEAR HOLMFIRTH,
86:
AND
87:
VALUABLE BEDS OF COAL.
88:
FTO be LET, froin year to year, or for a term of
89:
years. - Lot 1. All that MESSUAGE, DWELLING
90:
HOUSE, or TENEMENT, with the Garden, Barn, Stable,
91:
Mistal, Cart Shed, and other Outbuildings and Appur-
92:
tenances to the same, belonging, situate, and being at and
93:
called Stony Bank. Also four Closes of LAND, nsar
94:
to the said Messuage, containing together Nine Acres
95:
¢more or less), now in the possession of Mr. Thomas More-
96:
house, the owner.
97:
The tenant may, if required, be accommodated with
98:
about 2) acres more land, situate at a comvenient distance
99:
from the said messnage.
100:
The above Premises are well supplied with excellent wa-
101:
ter, and present a desirable situation fur a manufacturer,
102:
being distant within a mile from Holmfirth, six miles from
103:
Huddersfield, well-roaded, and only about 300 yards from
104:
the Mythim Bridge Station on the Holmfirth Branch of the
105:
Huddersfield and Sheffield Junction Railway.
106:
Lor 2. - All that TANYARD, containing 50 Pits, with
107:
the Cabin, Drying Shed, and other Appurtenances thereto
108:
Belonging, situate at Srony Bank aforesaid. Together
109:
with two Closes of LAND, adjoining thereto, containing
110:
4 acres (more or less).
111:
This lot is well supplied with water, and eligibly situated
112:
for a Tanner. or by a moderate outlay of capital may be
113:
converted into a Brewery, for which it is well adapted
114:
Lot 3 -Al] those two beds. of COAL called the Hard:
115:
Bed and the Soft Bed, lyizg under 20 acres of land,
116:
situate at Tor-o'-TH"-HILL, in Tharstonland, near to the
117:
north erd of the Thurstonland Tunnel, on the Huddersfield
118:
and Sheffield Junction Railway.
119:
This Coal may be got and delivered on the said Railway
120:
at a trifling expense.
121:
Possession may be had immediately, if required, and fur-
122:
ther particulars inay be obtained on application to Mr.
123:
MOREHOUSE, of Stony Bank aforesaid, or at the Offices of
124:
Mr. FLOYD, Soricrtor,
125:
Huddersfield and Holmfirth.
126:
Albion Street, Huddersfield,
127:
1st May, 1850.
128:
ZSCULAPIUS,
129:
RTSE Property of JOHN Matuiyson, Esq.,
130:
- Thickhollins, near Huddersfield (having proved him-
131:
self a sure foal-getter), will SERVE MARES this season,
132:
1850 :-Thorough-bred' Mares Five Guineas each, and 5s.
133:
the Groom ;. Country Mares Two Guineas each, and 2s. 6d.
134:
the Groam. e
135:
ESCULAPIES is a dark Bay, rising eight years old, stands
136:
15 Hands high, with beautiful Symmetry, and good Action,
137:
was got by Old Physician, dam: by Bay Comus, grandam
138:
y Tramp.
139:
OzD Prverorax was got by Brutandorf (which beat the
140:
best Horse England ever produced, viz :-Longwaist), by
141:
Blacklock, out of Mandane by Potato, and' was-the Sire of
142:
the following Winners :-Doctor Caws, Aristotle, David,
143:
Gallipot, Maria Day, Apothecary, and Tho Cure (which
144:
ran seeond for the Dencaster St. Leger), and several other
145:
first-rate Horses, and was sold by Mr. L. Heseltine to go
146:
abroad, for 2,500 Guineas, after covering in England at
147:
a Guineas each Mare, at Mr. Theobald's, at Stockwell; in
148:
urrey.,
149:
' OLD Bay Coutts was got by Comus, his dam by Sancho,
150:
winner of the St. Leger in 31804 ; grandam, Vesta, by. Del-
151:
puna, out of Faith by Pacelot; Faith was the dam of MR:..
152:
Garforth's Grey Mare Marcia.
153:
in 1832, at the same Meeting won the Scarborough Stakes,
154:
beating a Field of Six, apd a Sweepstake, heating Three ;
155:
at York, in 1833, won the King's Purse of 100 Guineag,
156:
beating Tom Boy and two others ; at the same Meeting
157:
won the Sitver Tureen, beating Nitocus and Emaneipation ;
158:
in 1834, won the King's Purse of 100 Guineas, beating the
159:
Consol, and at the same Meeting walked over for a Sweep-
160:
stake of 25 Sovereigns each, and at the same Meoting won
161:
a. Sweepstake, beating two others.
162:
The Money to be Paid on or before the last Round.
163:
AESCULAPIUS'S ROUTES -
164:
Monpays. - At Home all day.
165:
TUESDA Ys. - George Hotel, Huddersfield, from Ten o'clock
166:
-until Three ; and then proceeds, by way of Flockton and
167:
Midgley, to Bretton, for the Night.
168:
WEEDNESBAYS. - Woolley, Royston, Burton; Crown Inn,
169:
Barnsley ; Dodworth, Silkstome, and' to. the Rose and
170:
Crown, Penistone, for the Night.
171:
THUREDAYS. - Clayton West, Denby Dale, Darton, and te
172:
the George Inn, Wakefield, for the Night.
173:
FRIDAYS. - Leaves Wakefield at Three o'clock in the
174:
&ftemeon, and p by way of Oxset Street Side
175:
and Earlsheaton, to the Royal Hotel, Dewsbury, for the.
176:
ight.
177:
Satturrdays. - Mirfield, Brighouse ; White Swan, Halifax ;
178:
. .dilland, and Lindley.
179:
THE HUDDERSFIELD CHRONICLE, SATURDAY, MAY 4, 1860.
180:
TO ALE AND PORTER BREWERS, INNKEEPERS,
181:
c
182:
R. LANCASTER begs sompactfut to inform
183:
Se pate that he has recei: ectfully to ink the
184:
Trustees of Mr. Thomas Wilson's Estate, to Advertise for
185:
SALE by PUBLIC AUCTION, during the mt Month
186:
(may), all thé Valuable BREWERY PLANT, FIX-
187:
TURES, and UTENSILS, Cnsks, Carriages, Horses, Carts,
188:
WwW ns, Hay, &c., on the premises at Birkby Brewery,
189:
near Hudderstiekd, in the County of York, of which a more
190:
detailed account will be given in a future Advertisement.
191:
Further particulars may be had of Mr. F. TURNER,
192:
Commission Agent, or Mr, LANCASTER, Auctioneer.
193:
MARBLE AND STONE WORKS,
194:
NEAR THE RAILWAY STATION,
195:
. HUDDERSFIELD. ,
196:
ISHER anp DYSON wish to call the atten-
197:
tion of the public to their Stock of
198:
MARBLE CHIMNEY PIECES, .
199:
which cannot be surpassed for quailty of Material and
200:
Price, nor excellence of Workmanship.
201:
rble Chimney Pieces on hand tomo £1 and upwards,
202:
or got up to order in the most elaborate Styles.
203:
Monuments, Tombs, and Headstones executed to order,
204:
an the shortest. Notice, and on Reasonable Terms.
205:
Also Dressing Tables, Wash Stands, Hall Tables, &e.,
206:
aan or Passag Floors laid d of Foreign
207:
or e Floors laid in any description i
208:
or British Marble, Stone, or Slate, to any desion which
209:
may be seen at their Works, Raitway STREET, HUDDERS-
210:
FIELD,
211:
F. and D. have on hand a Stock of excellent. Marble,
212:
which cannot be surpassed for ground or elegance of
213:
IN THE COURT OF BANKRUPTCY FOR THE
214:
LEEDS DISTRICT.
215:
[' the Matter of Noau Gzorcx Banp, of Hud-
216:
 : dersfield, in the County of York, Bookseller amd
217:
Stationer, Dealer and Chapman, a Bankrupt: Petition
218:
dated 24th April, 1850. Before Mr. Commissioner AYRTON.
219:
Meeting for Proof of Debts and Choice of Assignees on
220:
the, Twenty-first Day of May, instant ; Meeting for last
221:
Examination and Proof of Debts on the 10th Day of Jue
222:
next, at Eleven o'clock in the Forenoon of each Day, at
223:
the Court of Bankruptcy for the Leeds District, Commer-
224:
cial Buildings, Leeds.
225:
Official Assignee-H. P. Hore, Lecds.
226:
Solicitors to Petition-W. and T. W. Clovan, Hud-
227:
derstield.
228:
Agent-Cnas. B. COURTENAY, Leeds.
229:
Huddersfield, 3rd May, 1850.
230:
ae ae Stee
231:
LRSM Fo y
232:
Br ae
233:
PHILOSOPHICAL HALL, HUDDERSFIED.
234:
FOR SIX NIGHTS.
235:
Commenring on THURSDAY, the 9th of May, 1850.
236:
Also a GRAND DAY PERFORMANCE will take place
237:
on Fripay next, at Fwo P a., by particular request, in
238:
the English and German Languages.
239:
ERR ORGINSKI ROSENFELD,
240:
the great Polish Professor of Natural Magic, begs to
241:
announce to the Gentry and Inhabitants of Huddersfield
242:
and its Vicinity, that at the request of several influential
243:
Families, he intends giving wonderful and unparalleled
244:
NECROMANTIC "ENTERTAINMENTS,
245:
illustrative of the fallacy of Necromancy, Demonology, and
246:
Witchcraft, on the above Evenings.
247:
SOFREES MYSTERIEUSES,
248:
embracing original and unparalleled Wonders of Natural
249:
Magic, as performed before the most illustrious Personages
250:
in Europe.
251:
The TIVING WATER, or Fishing Extraordinary, a
252:
great Russian Wonder.
253:
The Ladies are respectfully invited to take Wine with
254:
Herr ROSENFELD out of his INEXHAUSTIBLE BOTTLE,
255:
from which, in addition to Wine, he will produce Brandy,
256:
Irish Whisky, Scotch Whiskey, Rum, Geneva, English
257:
Gin, Curacoa, Maraschino, Gin and Peppermint.
258:
An entire Change of Performance cach Evening.
259:
It would be utterly impossible to present to the public,
260:
withm the limits of an advertisement, anything like a
261:
correct idea of the many wonderful feats performed each
262:
ROSENFELD would, therefore, respectfully invite. an early
263:
attendance, feeling persuaded that the Performance must
264:
give the greatest satisfaction to all who honour him with
265:
their company.
266:
Admission-Front Seats, 2s.; Back Seats, Is. ; Gallery,
267:
6d. Doors open at Seven o'clock: the Wonders to com-
268:
mence at Half-past precisely. The Performance is arranged
269:
to conclude as near Ten o'clock as possible. Carriages to
270:
be ordered at a Quarter before Ten.
271:
Believe not, but come and see
272:
THE INEXHAUSTIBLE BOTTLE!!
273:
"s A BAND OF MUSIC in attendanee each Evening.
274:
N. B. - Herr ROSENFELD attends Private Families, if
275:
required. Terms moderate.
276:
(licensed according to Act of Parliament).
277:
J. MOSLEY, LESSEE AMD MANAGER OF THE WEST YORK
278:
THEATRICAL CIRCUIT.
279:
'POSITIVELY THE LAST NIGHT OE THE
280:
ENGAGEMENT OF
281:
MR. GEORGE WILD
282:
AND
283:
MISS FANNY WILLIAMS.
284:
HIS PRESENT SATURDAY EVENING,
285:
May 4th, 1850, will be represented, for the second
286:
time here, the entirely new and exciting Drama called
287:
JACK IN THE WATER!
288:
Mr. GEORGE WILD.
289:
Miss Fanny WILLIAMS.
290:
After which,
291:
THE ARTFUL DODGE.
292:
To conclude with the Comic Extravaganza called
293:
PORK CHOPS;
294:
In both of which Pieces Mr. GEORGE WILD and Miss
295:
Fanny WILLIAMS will appear.
296:
Mr. Mosley has the pleasure t) an- once the Enzagement cf
297:
R. AND MRS. CHARLES DILLON,
298:
FOR SIX NIGHTS,
299:
From the London Theatres; who will make their first
300:
appearance on Monday Evening, May 6th, and during the
301:
eek, in some of the most popular and legitimate Pieees,
302:
in which they will sustain their original Characters.
303:
First Night, Monpay, May 6th, the beautiful Play of
304:
THE TRIALS OF THE HEART,
305:
As performed at the Theatre Royal, Haymarket, with the
306:
greatest success.
307:
-Mr. CHARLES DILLON.
308:
Mrs.. Hargrave Mrs. CHARLES DILLON.
309:
To conclude with a new and extraordinary Drama,
310:
founded upon the popular Romance by the great French
311:
Novellist, Ajexandre Dumas, entitled
312:
ADVENTURES of the COUNT DE MONTE CHRISTO !
313:
Performed for upwards of Two Seasons in Paris, with
314:
brilliant success; also in London, Manchester, and the
315:
principal provincial Theatres, and now produced for the
316:
first time in Hnddersfield, with new and appropriate
317:
Scenery and. Appointments, their original Characters by
318:
eee
319:
Mr. and Mrs. CHARLES DILLON.
320:
Op Physician ran fourth for the Doncaster St. Leger
321:
On Tuesday,. May 7th, the elegant and storling Comedy
322:
LEON OF ARRAGON;
323:
Or, Rule a Wife; and Have a Wife.
324:
Le0mt oie. ec eeeececeeeeeneeees MR.. Caanius DILLON.
325:
Margueretta ..................mrs, CHARLES DILLON.
326:
With a new Remantic Drama, in which Mr. and Mrs,
327:
CIARLES DILLON will perform..
328:
On WEDNESDAY, May 8th, 'the Tragedy of
329:
ROMEO AND J ULIET.
330:
Mr. Caarles DILLON.
331:
Mrs. CHARLES DILLON.
332:
With a New Drama. -
333:
On Taunspay, Fripay, and Saturpay Evenings,
334:
favourite new and Popular Pieees, in which Mr. and Mrs,
335:
Cuabces Dizon will perform their original Characters..
336:
FOR e emer ew eee ssateenerare
337:
Gallery, 6d. Second Price at Nine-o'clock ; Dress Boxes,
338:
ls. 6d. No Half-prige to Pit or Gallery.
339:
Doors open at HALS-Past SIX, Performance 'to commence
340:
at SEVEN o'clock,
341:
ne strictly prohibited. Pass-out Checks not trans-
342:
le.
343:
Season Tickets may te had of Mr. Bond, Printer, &c ,
344:
New Street, opposite the Post Office, Huddersfield.
345:
Evening, to astonished and delighted audiences. Herr
346:
Prices of Admission :-Dress Boxes, 2s.. 6d. ; Pit, 1s: ;
347:
GEORGE LANCASHIRE & CO,,
348:
PAPER. &-ACCOUNT-BOOK MAN UFACTURERS,
349:
Sratiexxry, Canvas, AND Roliing Boarp
350:
WAREHOUSE, ' .
351:
47, NEW-STREET, HUDDERSFIELD.
352:
' OOKS, consisting of ra, Day
353:
a ee ier
354:
tion, or any pattern made té order.
355:
'of every description, ito, or 8v0., Medium, Foolseap,
356:
Lettér Paper-Post Folio,
357:
Bact Co nd Blotting P
358:
rief, Copying, and Blotting Papers.
359:
White or Coloured Paper for Casing, used
360:
Brown Paper, glazed or ung .
361:
Jacquard Cards, Engine Joint Boards..
362:
Rohing Boards of all sizes.
363:
Canvas for Packing, various widths
364:
Sugar, Cap, Fruit, Tea, and Tobacco Papers, forgrocers, ke.
365:
Tea Papers Printed, and Paper made to order.
366:
Cartridze, Embossed, Tissue, and Cap Papers.
367:
Envelopes, Sealing Wax, and Wafers.
368:
Steel or Quill Pens ; Lead Pencils.
369:
Black and Red Ink : India Rubber.
370:
Direction Cards, large and small.
371:
Metallic Memorandum Books.
372:
No. and Yard Tickets.
373:
AGENTS for the IMPERIAL FIRE AND Lrrx OFFICE and
374:
the British GUARANTEE ASSOCIATION.
375:
Dept for MILNER & SON'S PATENT FIRE-PROOF
376:
SAFES and BOXES.
377:
BR OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that all the
378:
Goods, Chattels, and Household Effects, in and on
379:
the Premises now occupied by WILLIAM Bzpford, of
380:
South-street, Huddersfield, Plasterer, belong to and are
381:
the property of nie, the undersigned THOMAS ROBINSON,
382:
of Huddersfield, 'aforesaid, Attorney-at-law. - Dated this
383:
f ' 1 5 » v
384:
Second day of May, 1850 THOS. ROBINSON,
385:
se Attorney-at-Law.
386:
WEST-RIDING OF YORESHIRE.
387:
WAKEFIELD ADJOURNED SESSIONS.
388:
OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the
389:
SPRING GENERAL QUARTER Sessions of the Peace,
390:
for the West-Riding of the County of York, will be held
391:
adjournment in the Committee Room, at the House of
392:
Correction, at WAKEFIELD, on THURSDAY the 16th day
393:
of May instant, at Eleven A aoe " jorenone for
394:
the purpese of inspecting the Riding Prison e sai
395:
House of Conredtion, am for examining the accounts of
396:
the Governor of the said House of Correction, making en-
397:
quiry into the conduct of the Officers and Servants belong-
398:
ing to the same; and also the behaviour of the Prisoners
399:
d thei ;
400:
set nes corning C. H. ELSLEY,
401:
Cherk of the Peace.
402:
Clerk of Peace's Office, Wakefield,
403:
1st May, 1850.
404:
WES?-RIDING OF YORKSHIRE.
405:
ADJOURNMENT OF THE SPRING SESSIONS FOR
406:
THE TRIAL OF FELONS, &c.
407:
OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the
408:
SPRING GENERAL QUARTER SESSIONS of the Peace, for
409:
the West-Riding of the County of York, will be holden by
410:
adjournment at SHEFFIELD, on Friday, the 17th day of
411:
May instant, at Ten o'clock in the Forenoon, and by fur-
412:
ther adjournment from thence will be holden at BRADFORD,
413:
on Monday, the 20th day of the same month of May, at
414:
Ten o'clock in the Forenoon, for the Trial of Felons and
415:
Persons indicted for Misdemeanors, when all Jurors, Sui-
416:
tors, Persons who stand upon Recognizance, and others
417:
having business at the said Soasiven, are required to attend
418:
the Court.
419:
Prosecutors and Witnesses in eases of Felony and Misde-
420:
meanor from the Wapontakes of Strafforth and Tickhill,
421:
Osgoldcross and Staincross, must attend the Sessions at
422:
SHEFFIELD ; and those from the Wapontakes of Stainclitie
423:
and Ewcross, Claro, Ainsty, Agbrigg and Morley, Skyrack
424:
and Barkstonash, being the remainder of the West-Riding,
425:
must attend the Sessions at BRADFORD.
426:
C. H. ELSLEY,
427:
sent Clerk of the Peace.
428:
Clerk of the Peace's Office, Wakefield,
429:
- 8d May, 1850.
430:
a
431:
THE CHRONICLE,
432:
- ATAY 4, 1850.
433:
by Merchants, &c.
434:
THE BRADFORD AND HALIFAX
435:
EDUCATION MEETINGS.
436:
WHILE some of our contemporaries are asserting
437:
the eapability of the voluntary system as an educa-
438:
tional agent, meetings are being held day after day
439:
in the principal towns in this kingdom, at which
440:
resolutions repudiating the adequacy of the volun-
441:
tary principle are carried, in crowded meetings,
442:
}and by large majorities. In Leeds itself, where
443:
more pains-taking perseverance has been devoted
444:
to the sedulous culture of voluntaryism than else-
445:
where, resolutions were a few weeks since passed
446:
in favour of secular education, to be paid for by
447:
the State, but under the control and management
448:
of Local Boards,
449:
This week, two other opportunities have been
450:
afforded the inhabitants of this district of giving
451:
utterance to their views on this vexed question.
452:
On Monday evening, a erowded meeting, convened
453:
by the Mayor, and presided over by the Vicar, was
454:
held at Bradford ; and if we may judge from the
455:
good temper pervading the proceedings, the cor-
456:
elusion arrived at was an unmistakable indication
457:
of the opinions entertained on this matter by the
458:
majority of those assembled.
459:
The first resolution was moved, in a speech which
460:
touched the whole bearings of this controversy, by
461:
Mr. W. E. Forster, and was couched in the fol-
462:
lowing unmistakable and express terms :-
463:
That this meeting, while it acknowledges with pleasure
464:
the vast efforts voluntarily made in the cause: of education,
465:
and also the beneficial effects of the measures adopted by
466:
tho Educational Committee of the Privy Council, is. yet of
467:
opinion that there is such a deficiency both of the quantity
468:
and quality of the means of instruction, as to demand more
469:
general and comprehensive arrangements, and would. there
470:
ore urge upon Parliament the importance of meeting the
471:
wants of national education, by devising such measures as
472:
are necessary for its extension and improvement, on the
473:
principle of strict impartiality to all religious communions,
474:
and as far as possible, on the basis of local management.
475:
The amendment submitted went to establish the
476:
principle that all legislative interference with the
477:
business of education was opposed to the purposes
478:
for which Government was instituted, and would
479:
prove injurious to the best interests of the people.
480:
On a show of hands, however, three-fourthe of the
481:
meeting declared for the originat proposal. At
482:
Halifax, where a similar meeting was held on
483:
Tuesday, an equally decisive feeling was shown
484:
in favour of secular instruction, though an attempt
485:
was made to carry a resolution in favour of a system
486:
of education based on religious instruction.
487:
We have now in the same category Manchester,
488:
Leeds, Bradford, and Halifax, all subscribing to
489:
the secular movement, though on each occasion the
490:
advocates of voluntary aid have tested. the question
491:
by a show of hands.
492:
This, then, we may take as a. sufficient answer to.
493:
those gentlemen, in and out of Parliament, who
494:
have ventured to presume that secular instruction
495:
-a"part from the dogmas of particular sects,-is
496:
distasteful to the great bulk of the people, There
497:
never was a gveater delusion. Religiows convic-
498:
tions, now-a-days, pre-suppose the existence of some
499:
capability to tnderstand the right end wrong of,
500:
things. But we have a mas of poptilation who-
501:
weekly infost our jails and harg aa a log on cur
502:
county rates--who disregard the rights ef pro-
503:
perty while at large, and who contaminate each
504:
'other when in prison,-who, under the mildest
505:
treatment of prison discipline and religious in-
506:
struction there imparted, conie again along
507:
society the samd lawless, hopeless beings they
508:
were before. "- .
509:
What we require to remedy this up-growmng
510:
evil is a system of education which shall " grow
511:
t with their growth, and strengthen with their
512:
strength ;-a course of training in the moral duties
513:
of life which shall fit them to join that section of
514:
Christ's church in after years, which may seem to
515:
them most reconcilable with their notions of reli-
516:
gious belief, instead of growing up, as at present,
517:
regardless of religious teaching, come from what
518:
quarter soever it may.
519:
Those who oppose a national system of secular
520:
education know perfectly well that secular instruc
521:
tion, as such, does not indispose men from joining
522:
some one or other of the branches of Christ's
523:
church. They admit, in the abstraet, that it has
524:
just the 'contrary effect. Their real fears are
525:
aroused by an over-zealous desire to secure the
526:
edueation of the people in their own particular be-
527:
lief. Ina word, they are too anxious to make pro-
528:
selytes, and too lukewarm in the development of
529:
the truly Christian attributes of those already con
530:
nected with their churches. They would scale the
531:
lofty mountain in the distance, despising the
532:
meaner barrier near home, though the lattcr 1s
533:
necessary tu be surmounted before the former can
534:
be approached. Each section of Christians takes
535:
alarm at the movements in advance of any of their
536:
co-religionists. Hence, while some are promising
537:
to educate the people by voluntary exertions, and
538:
others seeking to secure the monopoly of education
539:
by the aid of Government grants, the people are
540:
left rooted in vice, and the prospects of set-
541:
ting to work in earnest become less hopeful and
542:
inviting. .
543:
We do not under-value the aid so ably given by
544:
the Christian church in educating the rising gene-
545:
tration. They deserve all honour for that. But inas-
546:
much as voluntary education cannot do the work
547:
either quick enough or on a scale sufficiently large,
548:
and inasmueh as party jealousy shuts them out from
549:
receiving state aid in connection with that work,-
550:
surely it can only be 2 cry resembling much the
551:
fable of the dog in the manger, which would desire
552:
the masses to stand still simply because certain
553:
p2rties, holding different views, cannot agree
554:
amongst themselves, or decide which shall give
555:
the word of command, and say-" Go on."
556:
a
557:
THE TEN HOURS' FACTORY ACT AND
558:
THE HUDDERSFIELD M. P.
559:
(from a Correspondent. )
560:
Ir turns out that the rumour was true to which
561:
we adverted last week, and which we were inclined
562:
to discredit ; and that W. R. C. Stansriexp, Esq.,
563:
the member for our own borough, had given notice
564:
of a motion respecting the Ten Hours' Faetory
565:
Act, which, if carried, would in fact repeal that
566:
measure, and legalize the working of young persons
567:
throughout the night. So that Huddersfield is, by
568:
this most unwise and most inconsiderate proceed-
569:
ing on the part of its representative, placed in the
570:
legalize the worst features and most reprehensible
571:
praetices of the unregulated factory system : prac-
572:
tices which every benevolent factory-owner felt to
573:
be a condemnation on the whole system, and con-
574:
cerning which it is matter of just pride and thank-
575:
fulness that they have been got rid of.
576:
The nature of the notice placed on the papers of
577:
.the House by the Huddersfield member will be
578:
seen by the following letter from the hon. gentle-
579:
man himself. It is in answer to a letter of inquiry
580:
from the Huddersfield Short Time Committee, and
581:
is as follows :-
582:
22, Charles-street Square, London,
583:
April 26th, 1850.
584:
Srr-In reply to your letter of yesterday's dute, stating
585:
'that there is a report in the public papers respecting a
586:
motion being placed by me on the books of the House of
587:
Commons for legalising relays, or shifts, in factories, and
588:
hoping that I would set the matter right, by giving a rea-
589:
son for so doing, &e., &ec., &e.," I most willingly comply
590:
with this request, and the more especially so, as the cha-
591:
racter of my notice has been quite misunderstood by others
592:
 : a8 well as the Short Time Committee. The words of my
593:
notice are as follows :-" In committee on the Factory Bill
594:
-to move an amendment, to allow young persons to work
595:
ten hours consecefivefy by Relays." Perhaps the last word
596:
is ambiguous, as my object is to permit young persons to
597:
work ten hours consecutively or continucusly from the time
598:
that each young person begins to work, and not shew when
599:
any young person begins, ss the bill proposed. This pro-
600:
posal scems to me not only just, but in the spirit of the 'ten
601:
Hours' Act, for it avoids the evil of shifts y making the
602:
labour continuous, and enables all youn persons to choose
603:
whether they would take the benefit of the two hours relax-
604:
atien, given by the present law, in the morning or in the
605:
oraning:
606:
(am sure it is not necessary te remind an rson in
607:
Huddorsfield, who has attended to my public contact, that
608:
I always openly opposed, both en the ustings and in the
609:
House, the Ten: Heurs Factory Act, believing it unjust to
610:
both workers and employers, and being of opinien that,
611:
when the legislature had Hmited the labour of children to
612:
six-and-a-half hours, and that of youn persons to twelve
613:
hours, (and also other given limits,) all was accomplished
614:
that legal Wations could, with justice, enforce. But,
615:
however, as the Ten Hoars Bill did pass, be assured that I
616:
shall not, by any indirect means, endeavour to destroy its
617:
purpose. My present notice eannot have that effect. The
618:
benefit it confers upon young persons, though small, is an
619:
attempt to give them the same privileges that children
620:
how enjoy, viz., that of beginning their work at various
621:
times of the day, and is quite in conformity with the spirit
622:
of the present act. This, my explanation, I hope, will re-
623:
move your apprehensions, and if not satisfactory to ihe
624:
Shovt Time Committee, will at least show that their fears
625:
were groundless. ,
626:
Please te inturm the deputation that when they come to
627:
London I shall have great pleasure in receiving them,
628:
eve me to remain, Sir, your obedient servant,
629:
(signed) w
630:
. R. C. STANSFIELD.
631:
John Leech, Esq., Secretary to the
632:
Short Time Cowmittee, Huddersfield.
633:
How the hon. member could have persuaded
634:
himself that his proposal is "in the spirit of the
635:
Ten Hours' Act," we really are at a loss even to
636:
conceive ; but having by some curious process of
637:
ratiocination persualed his own mind that such is
638:
the case, we can readily understand why he should
639:
'80 coolly try to persuade others into that belief.
640:
--His success in that particular, however, will be but !
641:
unenviable position of seeking to re-introd d .
642:
pos ° uce an cumstances of his last election, he wel: 4.
643:
indifferent.
644:
Yh
645:
auch # statement is
646:
sure, and the surprising stare of
647:
ness of his deduction,
648:
should be discouraged and prohibite:i
649:
llam, JAMES at 2 p.m. and Rogzar
650:
and to let each of these work twelve
651:
hours oft for meals) from the time ~
652:
Act !"
653:
But more than this: this ever-shis'..
654:
uncertain, catch-me-no-where system.
655:
to "avoid the EVIL of shifts," by makin. '
656:
hon. gentleman himself, we should have .
657:
so frequently both "smokes" and ~ iroy,
658:
to use the old hacknied phrase of ,
659:
" comment is unnecessary."
660:
We could have hoped, for the ere:{i:
661:
of our town, that the maiden effort
662:
sentative "in the House," should haw.
663:
a more dignified and creditable chars:
664:
one he has chosen for his legislativ-
665:
"has had the honour of a seat" in th.
666:
for now nearly fifteen years ; and w-
667:
is the first notice respecting pablic bus:
668:
duced in its support, will be such as -
669:
friends of Mr. STANSFIELD cause tw r='.
670:
long fifteen-years-silence has been '
671:
say this to the hon. member in al) -)
672:
and acuteness of mortified humiliac) a.
673:
One thing in connexion with :h's
674:
trust will not be lost sight of: the ~
675:
this district are not with Mr. Srasx-:-
676:
efforts to open the factories for nu \\-
677:
young persons and women. As ti
678:
stituents are concerned, we believe +),
679:
be entirely his oa ; and, thouzh w- »
680:
pall its legitimate extent the principl-
681:
dence in a member from slavish s.
682:
are occasions where a represeutat. -
683:
to have some regard for the ©;
684:
feelings of his constituents; and we =
685:
sideration, and had remembered the »-
686:
tated ere he had placed himselt in
687:
give pain and regret to a great pectio
688:
supporters.
689:
Respecting the Ten Heurs' Act. "-
690:
direct motion. But let us net hav- i.
691:
accomplished by a motion said to be ~
692:
Act a nullity.
693:
mercial public recently sought for the »
694:
Corn- Laws, in which movement they
695:
by Mr. Sransfietp. In that objest.
696:
succeeded : having converted two Princ
697:
repeal, it had turned out, that fron -r-
698:
the party drawing it, the avowed inte: s
699:
legislature had been defeated, and an
700:
duty at all.
701:
Parliament under such ecireumstancss
702:
would Mr. Sranswirip himself box:
703:
speedily as possible. Nothing more.
704:
less. With what a chorus of dersi+
705:
xs
706:
would have been reeeived-the ns
707:
they had contended that such propesu "
708:
spirit of the Act'-and was mt pe
709:
repeal by " indirect means."
710:
Let not Mr, Stans FIELD flatter
711:
operatives are not as sensitive
712:
question-tor which they as arden
713:
would have been on the Corn-Law x
714:
he would have been eontent te receive °
715:
Let justice be done, thongzh the heaven
716:
ytinuous. Really, if we had not seen th. \. -
717:
which we are quoting in the hand writin:
718:
is here some mistake,""-or thonghr th
719:
come from that wicked wag of Fleet-rp..
720:
duty retained on all wheat importe:!, 1. - :
721:
What would have been -u- 7"
722:
proposal by the Pretectionists to take »
723:
the error, and to continue the eighrsiuu%
724:
duously fought,-as he and the coarmue:
725:
le .af. incredulity
726:
"certain to be received DY oer
727:
the niost active opponent of the Ten Hou,
728:
followed by 2 burst of involuntary eachinaty-.
729:
cule, which the simple statement world 2...
730:
}any thinking friend of the existing Acc...
731:
surely, (cotild he but see them,) have the wim.
732:
raismg a doubt in Mr. Srasrtztp's mini.
733:
to the correctness of his fact and the ley::;
734:
Of
735:
"the spirit of the Ten Hours' Act™ ,..,
736:
for the culture of the mind; was, ¢;,,, <
737:
learning of dumestic duties; was, thar Lo. ,
738:
work (proper for young persons) shonki 5, .
739:
formed in the day ; and that night-work in Ser, "
740:
eat
741:
Req,
742:
' ij
743:
Ree.
744:
MP .
745:
ee
746:
Thats.
747:
iP
748:
as F
749:
he
750:
ers
751:
Lc +
752:
che
753:
oa
754:
Cours
755:
"ler
756:
ech
757:
Lt
758:
ah
759:
we mean our satirist friend, Punch. &.. - oy
760:
sober proposal is placed in sober liter, .,,,
761:
Mr. Sransfielp himself: and there we !ea:.. -
762:
au
763:
een
764:
young persons and women were concerny; ~
765:
hon, member's proposal is to keepopen th. =.
766:
at all hours for fresh batches of new com
767:
Sara begin at 6a.m., Berry at 9 am. dex
768:
ae
769:
work," and then cease for the dav. \,, -
770:
proposed as being "in the spirit of the Tun =
771:
CF nes.
772:
oP
773:
mii! r
774:
be
775:
has placed on the records, We fear tha:
776:
the notice itself, nor the reasons that ».)
777:
from coercive dictation, yet we must ~. -
778:
-Wit
779:
Mr. Sransfiep had taken these martes =:
780:
me ee
781:
.if it is to be repealed, let it be be fier
782:
Let us put a case. The manufieturue
783:
duous and almost unprecedented st-.:~
784:
bere
785:
of the Act," while im practice it woull -s. -
786:
Mi
787:
and taken the subordinates and expe tints
788:
by storm. Suppose that in the Act -diem.
789:
Sunply, that Parliament would repalr =:
790:
the circumstances suppesed : and 22t 2-
791:
to put the operatives off with a los "s-
792:
Justice,-or rather with ne measur & -
793:
total.of 242,529 qualitied voters, Eugene >
794:
obtained 125,352 votes. The nuwaber poles
795:
at the same time being I17,177. 'phe a
796:
'equally, 6.675 military votes bein: siver '
797:
to Lectere. Allthe enerzes of boa partus =
798:
erted to the very utmust, se that the prese!
799:
calm and decisive measurement of stres.<'))
800:
'fhiers, Berryer, Montalembert, Genes ><
801:
General Grammont were summone! no 4
802:
treet the President, where they remained ©
803:
several hours. A rumour obtains vf v!
804:
and there is consideral le Unecusiness.
805:
Cents. fell to 87r. 40c. as suom as the intilie-
806:
Success Was made known. Paris 8 cow un '
807:
etevery fort and colour, the pape rs are ©
808:
Valine
809:
Fe,
810:
and some journals strongly advise the pe)
811:
the Hutel de Ville to hear the announcemen> -4
812:
for four of a collisicun,
813:
FRANCE. -The election in Paris, is 2:c0h~

view the contents page of Huddersfield Chronicle (04/May/1850)