Huddersfield Chronicle (04/May/1850) - page 3

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POETRY.
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pe
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a MAY-DAY WALK,
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(extract from a long Poewm.)
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By Jouy CRITCHLEY Prixce
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Brest be this bright and breezy May,
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Which smiles away my sorrow !
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J] snatch a harmless joy to-day,
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Tho' troubles come to-morrow ;-
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Who would not breathe this gerierous air
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Which meaner things delight in?
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Who would et nature's banquet share,
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Hier own sweet self inviting?
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Come forth, mY friend of kindred mind,.
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My friend in every weather ;
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Leave Maummon's ledger-cre behind,
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And ict us s:ray together ;
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Come furth in quest of liberty,
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Nor think of looms and spindles,
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We'll seck health, peace, and poesy;
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'wong mountain giers and rindles.'
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" }fan liveth not by bread alone,"
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Truth from a source transcendant-
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qwg gor: asks something of its own,
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Le atoss, and less dependant :
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Tic: ms the privilege of thought
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- Brzoud the dusty real,
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Its hopeful visions, called and caught
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Prem reaims of the ideal.
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And genial nature's humblest things,
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In wintry gasb er vermat;
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Can lend lis longing spirit wings
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To reach some sphere supernal ;
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A rose-busu shivering 'gainst the sky,
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A weed of beauteous seeming,
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'A dew-drop in a cowslip's eye,
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Wich trembling lustre beaming.
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Many the motiverand the means
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. Wherewith God deigns to gift us,
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Tat unto higher, holier scenes,
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In thoughtful hours uplift us ;
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And it is qood to break away
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From the cold world's harsh laughter,
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And svar into 2 purer day,
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The s. a low of hereafter.
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Jor, my dear friend ! at length we're out,
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'away from crowds and clamours,
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Fron wl the rumbling and the rout
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Of engines, looms, and hammers ;
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utains rise upon our sight,
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Ané breathe of pleasant places ;
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Well -} ere day arops tute night,
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Ticir graudeurs and their graces.
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' 4 Lancashire word for streamlet.
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Acshton-under-Lyne, May Ist.
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FIRESIDE READINGS.
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A man, rho had by his own unaided exertions become
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4), was asked by his friend the secret of his suceéss. <I
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 : d," said he, " about one half of my property by
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tending to my own business, and the other half by letting
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her people's entirely alone."
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ATION BY THE BIBLE AND KEYY. - Thissupersti-
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ery prevalent amongst the peasantry of this and
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» adjoining parishes. When any article is sus to
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ye been stulen a Bible is preeured, and opened at the 1st
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pter of Ruth: the stock of a street-door key is then
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(ion the ltith verse of the above chapter, the handle pro-
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ding from the edge of the Bible ; and the key is secured
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this position by a string, bound tightly round the book.
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@ person who works the charm then places his two
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ddie fingers under the handle of the key, and this keeps
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Billesuspended. He thenrepeats in succession the names
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he parties suspected of thetkeft ; repeating at each name
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of the verse on which thekey isplaced, commencing,
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ther thou goest, I will go," &c. When the name of
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wulty party is pronounced the key turns off the fingers,
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Lihle falls to the ground, and the guilt of the party is
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picrmined. The belief of some of the more ignorant of
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fe lower orders in this charm is unbounded. T have seen
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tised in other counties, the key being laid over the
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hb verse of the 19th chapter of Proverbs, instead of the 1st
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apier of Ruth. - Notes and Queries.
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Disth OF THE Port Worpsworth. - It is with feel-
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r- of much regret that we announce the death of William
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"orth. The illustrious breathed. his last,. at
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Fw
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Westmoreland, which his residence and his verse had
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idered famous. Full of years, as of honours, the old
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pn had time to accomplish all that he was capable of ac-
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pinning ere he was called away. Removed, by taste
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'ltcmperment, from the busy scenes of the world, his
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iif was spent in the conception and elaboration of his
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in the midst of the sylvan solitudes of which he was
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.ched, EXIS- length of days permitted him to
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ardian of His own fame-he could bring his
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'juianent to bear upon the first bursts of his
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W inspiration, as well as upon the more measured
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f his maturest compositions. Whatever now stands
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he full collection of his works has received the final
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autos from the poet's hand, sitting in judgment upon
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n works under the infiuence of a generation later
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his own. It is sufficiently characteristic of the man,
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tle has been attered, and still lesscondemned. Open
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es to the influences of external nature, he was
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'in liffereat to the judgment of men, or rather so
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vel of his own judgment that he could brook no
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. Nature was his book, of which he would admit
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erpretation but his own.
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i Sar Coxpition oF Domestic Servarts. - There
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n which the age of imagination, that handmaid:
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nay be more advantageously employed than in
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the condition of domestic servants. Let aman
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r to realise it to himself-let him think of its nar-
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w sphere, of its unvarying nature-and he will be careful
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pt ty throw in, unnecessarily, the trouble even of a single
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mh word, which may make so large a disturbance in the
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iliow current of a domestic's hopes and joys. How
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on the contrary, do you find that masters seem to
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no apprehension of the feelings of those under them-
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<# any duties on their side teyond' "cash-payment;"
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the good cld patriarchal feeling towards your
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i isone which the mere introduction of money
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13s not by any means superseded, and which cannot,
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ct, be superseded. You would bear with lenity from
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i many things, for which, in a servant, you can find
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but the harshest names. Yet how often are these
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neducated creatures little better than children! You
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19, of inuratitude from them, when if you reflected a
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you would see that they do not understand your
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is, Itis hard enough, sometimes, to make benefits
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into men's hearts, even when. your good offices are
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ated Ly much kindness of words and manners ; but
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expect that servants should at once appreciate-your care
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r tuem is surcly most unreasonable, especially if it is not
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( ied by a manifest regard and sympathy. You
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orld not expect it if you saw the child-like relation in
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ten Luey stand to you. - Lhe Clains of Labour.
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Jory Hrme's Ortc=s . - Consilerably more than-half
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c "go there dwelt in-a small borough of Forfarshire
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Jnr widow, who eared a humble but respectable liveli-
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v herself and her only son by keeping a stail, princi-
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ior the sale of crockery ware; in the marke+-place. It
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'tane when gentlemen lived harder than they do now,
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"aithoush the word "waterfurdising" had not been in-
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the thing implied by it was greatly in vogue: The
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ive then were net unaecustomed: to the ocsasional
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> aha rough practical jokes of a neighbouring gentle
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"uo had latuly succeeded to enormous property and
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"xe, and there was no partizular rise manifested
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~" one Evening, the humble stall of tlie widuw. was
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led In an afterdinner frolic, and the brittle ware it
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ed smashed upon the street. The aggressor was
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wihiire. Next morning the proprietress of the stall
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Upon his Lordship, and:the claim for damages was
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Settled to tne satistaction:of all' partizs. " And now;
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m. ve Soman," said the overthrower of the crockery
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vg @ there anything else Ian do for you ?" The widow
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"he had an only son, a snarp little fellow, whom;
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i to set receiving a better education than her limit-
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oa Gece' her to bestow-ontim. Lord. Panmure at
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~ pr steed tie necessary aid. He was as-good as his
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title Jucy was sent for.. 'the intelligence and
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f the boy were readily recognised and hizht'y com-
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oy He Was at once placed in an execlient school.
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the curiousty-caused commencement of a long
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and honour. The little boy, the poor
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Y
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Of Industry
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. ae was-Josoph Hume. - Ijllustrated Vers.
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"paper thus corrects one of its own errors :-For
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r¥ Te Duke of Dorset, read His Grace. the
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"0 On Tuesday week, by the side of that beautiful lake.
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Ratwer Unonanrrasiz. - Dr. Peace, Dean of Ely, was
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] Once at a dinner, when, just as the cloth
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was removed, the
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meta empleo
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a s. "We have lost," said a gentle-
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the The Phan, "z,omiment arr i ne meee
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suet 2" The who Wat quite deaf, rose as his
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fr finished his remarks, and gave the company grace-
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For this and every mercy the Lord's name be praised."
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Music: Ear ann Tasre. - An ear for music is a
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different from a taste for music. I have no ear
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whatever : I coutd Sot sing an air to save my life ; but I
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Ve the intensest delight ity mitsic; and-can detect good
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from bad.. li, a good fellow, remarked to me once at a
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concert, that I did not seem much interestett with a Piece
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fof Rossini's which had just been performed. I said, it
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'sounded to me like nonsense verses: But I could scarcely
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contain myself when a y -
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Coleridge thing' of Beethoven's followed.
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GENTILITY-Gentility is the death and destruction of
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social happiness amongst the middle classes in E land.
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It destroys naturalness (if I may coin such a wo ) and
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kindly sympathies. The object of life, as I take it, is to be
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} friendly with everybedy. As a rule, and to a philosophical
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cosmopolite, every man ought fo' be welcome, I do not mean
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to your intimacy or affection, but to your society ; as there
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is, if we would or could but discover it, something notable,
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something worthy of observation, of sympathy, of wonder
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and amusement in every fellow-mortal. Consider how
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many a good fellow you may shut out and sneer upon !
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what an immense deal of picesure, frankness, kindness,
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good fellowship we forego for the eake of our confounded
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gentility, and respect for outward show. - Punch.
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Party Tyranxy IN THE Unitep Srates. - It is difficult
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in this country to conceive the force and influence of this
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unmitigated tyranny. With us party influences are
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F weakened by local distribution. Ey Ambrica they are
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concentrated into one inflexible despotism, which every
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member of the party implicitly obeys. In this respect, the
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party man in America is entirely divested of his individual-
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ism. He acts and thinks with his party ; its will is his
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supreme law. The mischief is, that this strict obedience
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is alike required through good and through evil report. The
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policy of the day must be upheld, whatever it may be.
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It is thus that the flagitious war with Mexico was espoused
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by the whole Gemocratie party, and that no democrat who
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has any favours to expect, or who would escape annoyance,
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dared utter a syllable against the'conduct of the adminis-
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tration. 'the man who wouldn't stand by his own
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prez'dent deserves to be tabooed," said a democrat to me
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one day, on my suggesting, about the period of its com-
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mencement, that the war might not be universally accept-
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able to the party, This is the true spring of party action.
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Stand by the president, or, in other words, stand by the
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y, whatever may be the complexion of its policy.
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here must be no squeamishness. The man who is not
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hot, is declared tobe cold. The rotten limb is immediately
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lopped off the tree. It is not only the rank and file that
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yield to this terrible influence-the party leaders bow to it.
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ite . fated submission. There are Tandrede around them
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who, for their own pu , are constantly taking the
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measure of their poltizeal statare, and who ae ever ready
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to report any questionable act, incautious sentiment, or
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inapt expression, to their common master. N ay, more, a
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rival is uently got rid of by first entrapping, and then
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denouncing him. This intellectual subjugation-this utter
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absorption of the individual in the party-is, perhaps, the
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worst achievement of American democracy. It is felt to
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be a galling tyranny by more than dare confess it so; and
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'establishes this curious anomaly, that in the freest country
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political action or thought than under many of the mixed
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governments of Europe. - Mackay's Western World.
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Europe at Peace. - Our domestic peace, we cannot but
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preceive, as good as keeps itself. Here and there a select
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equitable person, appointed by the public for that end, clad
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in ermine, and backed by certain companies of blue police,
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is amply adequate, without immoderate outlay in money or
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otherwise, to keep down the few exceptional individuals of
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the scoundrel kind'; who we. observe, by the nature of
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them, are always weak = inconsiderable- has as to
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foreign peace, really urope, now especially with so
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roan railroads, public journals, printed. books, penny
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posts, bills of exchange, and continual intercourse and
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mutual dependence, is more and more becoming (so to
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speak) one parish ; the parishioners of which being, as we
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ourselves are, an immense majority peaceable hard-working
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people, could, if they were moderately well-guided, have
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aimost-no disposition to quarrel. Their eeonomie interests
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are one, "TO buy in the cheapest market and sell in the
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dearest ;" their faith, any religious faith they have, is one,
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"To annihilate shams, by all methods,-street-barricades
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included." Why should they quarrel? The Czar of Russia,
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in the eastern parts of the parish, may have other notions: ;.
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But he knows too well he must keep them to himself. He,
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if he meddled with the western parts, and attempted any-
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where to crush or disturb that sacred democratic faith of
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theirs, is aware there would rise from a hundred and fifty
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million human throats such a hymn of the Marseillese as
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was never heard before ; and. England, France, Germany,
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Poland, Hungary, and the nine kingdoms, hurling them-
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selves upon him in never-imagined fire of vengeance, would
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swiftly reduce his Russia and him toa strange situation !
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Wherefore he forbears,-and being a person of some sense,
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wili lone forbear.
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of Russia does not dist our night's rest. And with the
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other parts of the parish our dreams and our thoughts are
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of anything but of fighting, or of the smallest need to'
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fight. - Carlyle's Fourt Pamphlet.
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PROTECTIONIST Tactics. - " In this question," said Lord
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Jofin Russel}-in that speech on the address which in
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breadth of vicw and quiet force has seldom been excelled
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by him,-"IN this question every man: has a stake, every
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man. woman, and child has and feels an'interest.. If you
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put on a duty raising the price, every man would court the
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additional 1s., Is. 6d., or 2s. a week, which you would
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have made him pay for the support of his family. Now,
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are you ready to face that question?" It would be facing
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a powder magazine with a torch. And yet there are, or
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were a few weeks ago, some of those who have most to lose
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and most to fear who seemed, nevertheless, disposed to face
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the enterprise. We shall not soon forget the startlin
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recklessness of spirit and coarseness of speech with whic
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raonths back, en tliis desperate' crusade.. Never'did poor
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Chartist demagogue, besotted with ignorance and the
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fumes of mob-applause,-and perhaps speaking in hunger
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for bread, and not in thirst for revenge,-vapour either
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more foolishly or more fiercely than sundry Protectionist
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leaders, from Dukes downwa: It is an evil thing when
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peers talk glibly of "revolution" as something likely, if
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not justifiable ; and when county members denounce the
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chief statesmen of the country as "liars," amid applanding
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yells and oaths. And under what motive and cue for pas-
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sion do-these nobles and-senators thus
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Drown the stage with tears,-
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And cleave the general ear with berrid speech !
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It is in a breeches ket cause, a question Letween their
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pockets und the pockets of the rest of the community.
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ey talk of revolution, and do their utmost, by fair means
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and foul, to get up an agitation,-in order to escape from
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the greivance of cheap bread'! What, after Great Britain
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-"serene like: heaven above: the' clouds"-has preserved
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throughout the revolutionary storm which has been recently
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sweeping over Europe, an altitude and aspect which will form
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one of the noblest features in her noble history ; after having
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remained unshaken, unseduced, unterrified amid the war
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of principles and the: crash of thrones ; is she to be cast
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into coufision and danger from motives mean as these and
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for objects so unreasonable and hopeless? And worse,
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after our industrious masses- stood patient through the
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semi-famine of 1847, and loyal through the revolutionary
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fever of 1838, are' our aristocracy to exhibit themselves in
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the character of wanton disturbers of the public peace, when-
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ever their commodity, the-poor'man's loaf, is not so dear as
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-searcity and monopoly might make it ? Such a course would
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it is to their interests. - From an able article on Agricul-
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tural Complaints in the Edtnburgh Review.
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ATTEMETED' MURDER By A Pucilist. - On Saturday
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'night last a pugilist nenred Donovan, was out until
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midnight in the city drinking. They both returned to-
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gether to their residence; in Short's Gardens, Drury Lane,
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-when words ensued, and subsequently Donovan struck the
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wife, who then opened the window, and attempted to make
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her escape"by that means from her brutal husband. Don-
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ovan caught hold' on- her as she was leaning out at- the
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window, and thrust her out into the yard. The' poor
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worran fell on her head, fractured her skull, and is not
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expected to recover. The husband stands remanded
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pending the wife's recovery or death.
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MUTION FROM. AMERICA. - A vessel which has arrived
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from: New York, has brought 58 barrels of mutton, as a
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'portion of 'her cargo consigned, the produce of the. United
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Statcs of America. No previous importation of this, des-
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cription of anima] food has taken place from the: United
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States, cither in a fresh or salted condition, if we except
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some -smail importations, at uncertain intervals, of hams'
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which, not.being smoked and entirely prepared for use-as-
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hams, according to the common acceptation uf the term,
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have been admitted duty free. The present importation of
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mutton from America is therefore of some intoyest ond
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importance...
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-ragged
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. truly say,
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'in the world, a man may have less individual freedom of
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ceriain even of the magnates of the land' set out, scme-five+.
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'for'a young lady,
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not be grateful, nor decent, nor prudent ; and it is alien, we-
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believe, to the instinets of English gentlemen, as we are sure:
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made from mutton legs, and termed mutton hams; ard tthe. most clegant and sitaple novelty of tlis:kind is quite-a:
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~ CONDITION OF THE PEOPLE IN GERMANY.
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Saxony and Bohemia lie side by side. The majority of
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the people of these two countries the same y
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rofess the
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seme religion, and to the same race ;
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ut the condition of the reasante of the two countries is as
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different as can well be imagined. i
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have visited and carefully i
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inspected twice, there is v
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little pauperism ; the people are well ) lad
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and comfortably clad
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or badly patched clothes are seldom, I might
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never geen ; are ly ever met with ;
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the houses of the peasantry are remar large, i
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roomy, convenient, substantially built, constantly white-
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washed, and orderly iit appearance ; the children are always
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clean, well dreasedl, and very polite in their miiitvers ; there
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is little or no difference between the appearance of the chil-
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dren of the poor and of the rich ; the land is perhaps better
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cultivated than in any other part of Europe; and the
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general condition of the peasantry more prosperous than
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that of any other I have seen, except it be that of the
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try of the cantons of Berne, Vaud, and Neuchatel,
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in 'switzerland, or of the Rhine provinces of Prussia. In
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Bohemia, on the other hand, a totally different spectacle
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Presents itself, and one which cannot fail to strike any in-
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telligent traveller with astonishment. 'phe moment he has
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crossed the Saxon frontiers, the traveller tinds himself sur-
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rounded by crowds of beggars of the most miserable ap-
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pearance, who strongly remind him of the sight which
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meets his eyes in Ireland ; while even those peasants, who do
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not beg, are very poorly dressed, wear no shoes or stockings,
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and often appear in rags. The cottages are-very small and
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wretched ; villages are generally only collections of the
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most miserable wooden cabins of one' storey
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crowded together as closely as: possible:;
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itself is only half cultivated, and
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in height, and
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and the land
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id presents about the same-
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contrast to Saxony as Ireland does to Envland: But
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what is' the cause of this difference? It is easily explained.
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In Saxony the people are admirably educated by teachers
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of great erudition and practical good sense, who have been
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for many years past engaged in awakening and directing
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the intelligence of the children, and in teaching them to
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think. In Bohemia, although there are plenty of schools,
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the instruction given to them is much inferior to that given
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in the Saxon schools, and is planned. so as to: make the-
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people good subjects:; whilé that of Saxony is' planned so
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as to make the Saxon peasants intelligent citizens. In
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Saxony the land is divided: among the peasants, the entail
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law having been repealed, so that the ts feel stongly
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interested in the cultivation of their little properties, and
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study how to make them as productive as possible. In
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Bohemia: the land is divided among greatnobles; who leave
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their estates in the hands of agents, and carry off all thei"
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rents, to'spend them in the distant metropolis of Vienna.
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The peasants of Bohemia, therefore, like the people of
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Treland, feel no interest in the soil, or in its proper cultiva-
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tion, as they derive no benefit from it, and as they are de-
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prived of any chance of acquiring land, and of raising them-
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selves in the social scale ; whilst those who can think at all,
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are exasperated by seeing the fruits of their labour and of
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their country spent among strangers at Vienna, I tra-
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velled- through one part of Bohemia-with a Saxon. He
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pointed out the beggars to me, and the: poor dress of the
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peasants, and said, with pride, " You will not see such
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sights in my country, sir ; our peasants are owners of their
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own little estates, and has been steadily improving in their
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social condition ever since we repealed our entail laws,
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and allowed the land to be subdivided among them ; and
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ever since we began to educate the children as we now
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educate them. Our people are all well educated, have got
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libraries in their villages, and are contented because they
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aro intelligent, end know that their success in life depends
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upon their own exertions, and' that there is-nothing. to-pre-
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vent their succeeding, if they are only prudent. - But these
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poor Bohemians have no strong stimulus to be prudent
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and industrious, for they have no interest in the soil ; they
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are the serfs of the great lords of Vienna." It seemed
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to me that there was some similarity between the cases
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of the Bohemian and the Irish peasantry. I travelled
444:
through one part of Bohemia, in company with a very in-
445:
telligent Prussian landlord, with whom I had a great deal
446:
of conversation. He said to me, 'what a strange spec-
447:
tacle it isto see this fine country so badly cultivated, and
448:
the peasants so poorly housed. Look, too, what. great
449:
tracts are entirely uncultivated: You do not see artything
450:
like this in those: parts-of Prussia where the peasants are
451:
educated proprietors, There they are prosperous, and
452:
the land is beautifully cultivated. Here a great part of
453:
the land is waste; while the peasants are the miserable
454:
serfs of the great lords who spenc their rents at a distance
455:
from their estates. If Bohemia were only cultivated like
456:
Prussia, it would be one of the richest cotintrierim Europe.
457:
But it never can be properly cultivated under the present
458:
system." This was a remarkable opinion, to be uttered by
459:
a German landiord. Butso itis The different effects of
460:
these different systems of legislation are so conspicuous,
461:
that no one who is commonly intelligent can fail to remark
462:
it ; while no one who does perceive it, can mect it in this
463:
case by the old argument, "it is the difference of race
464:
which occasions this difference in the condition and ocha-
465:
racter of the people." The iruth is, racé' has little or
466:
nothing to do with the degradation of either the Bohemian,
467:
the Austrian, or the Irish peasantry. In each of these
468:
cases it is entirely the resuit of bad social and political
469:
institutions. - Kay's Social Condition and Education of
470:
the People.
471:
In spite of editorial prophecy, the Czar'f°
472:
FASHIONS FOR MAY..
473:
(from le Follett.)
474:
The robes redingotes are greatiy in favour this spring.
475:
The form is easy and becoming, and gives opportunity for
476:
the display of taste and richness in the magnificent chemi-
477:
settes worn with this toilette, especially those trimmed
478:
across with narrow frills of Malines or Valenciennes lace,
479:
with insertions of embroidered miustlin ;. or those still more
480:
dressy, the lace of which:floats over the front of the body,
481:
forms a jabot 8 Louis XV. Many of these robes redingotes
482:
have révers on the body, and we very much approve of this
483:
trimming. It gives grace to a plain body, is an advantage
484:
to the bust, and renders the robe more dressy. The form
485:
of the sleeves is an easy Amadis. They are made short,
486:
and progressively large, in order to allow of the under
487:
sleeves, which are larger than ever. All these dresses are
488:
trimmed with flounces, pinked to imitate English em-
489:
broidery. The chicrées, or the profusion of narrow woollen
490:
laces; which aro-placed one over the other,.have a charming
491:
effect ; but especial care: must: be: taken te match. the :
492:
woollen lace to the dress, in order that this trimming may
493:
be distingué.
494:
The Casawecks have so entirely ingratiated themselves
495:
into favour for in-door costume, that it will be difficult en-
496:
tirely to renounce them. Their reign is far from over ; for
497:
at the present time some beautiful ones are made in taffetas
498:
glacé in all colours, with pagoda sleeves. They are trimmed
499:
all round with narrow chicorées to match.
500:
We:have also noticed.a charming capot of white taffetas
501:
'the edge is trimmed with two narrow.
502:
biases of crépe-lisse, and' two rows of narrow blonde. Four
503:
simple runnings from. the front. The crown is-entirely'
504:
covered with biases of crépe-lisse and blonde alternately.
505:
another of pink crépe-lisse, with two biases of pink taffetas,
506:
about the width of an inch, covered with crape: These
507:
two biases placed upon the transparent front resemble two-
508:
graceful ribbons. The crépe is gathered full over the:cur-
509:
tain. The-edge of the front has four rows of blonde, pine
510:
en ruche.. The inside is trimmed with blonde: and lilics;.
511:
A magnificent Leghorn bonne is now worn; trimmed:with
512:
white feathers. The inside is trimmed with daisies A
513:
charming capots is made of blue. and. white glace taffetas.
514:
The trimming is a barbe of lace, placed upon the crown,
515:
crossing over the front, the ends falling on'either side. It
516:
must be remarked that the shape of the bonnet is
517:
slightly opened, being the most becoming ;. and good taste
518:
disapproves of the enormous fronts, the interior of which
519:
areloaded with flowers. They are-both heavy and devoid
520:
of grace. The same may be said-of the flat and square
521:
exowns, which fashion does not recognise in its salons. The
522:
slightly domed crown is light and: coquetish, and permits
523:
of a diversity of trimming. Tke curtains are particularly
524:
pretty, being clegantly full, and-suffieiently narrow to leave
525:
the neck at liberty,-an important precaution, as the pret-
526:
tiest coiffures, when they fall on. the shoulders, become
527:
quite ungraceful. The prettiest: flowers worn upon Lez-
528:
horn or rice straw bonnets are: the almond, apricot, and
529:
chesnut blossoms.
530:
For dresses for full dress: ta@fetas camaieux, with broad
531:
stripes of white upon a grey ground, sea-green, or blue,
532:
strewed with bouquets or branches in all colours are much
533:
admired, especially the double pékins. with dark stripes on
534:
alight ground, all of which have flounces scolloped and
535:
embroidered in the same-shade as the dress.
536:
The pardessus decidedly adopted by our fashionables
537:
are, for the most part, closely fitting the waist behind, and
538:
floating luosely in front. - Those which do not fit so closely
539:
are sutficiently curved to indicate the figure. The most
540:
elegant trimming for these pardessus is a deep lace, some-
541:
times placed in a double:row at the bottom, and two others,
542:
sufficientiy high to cove:the ovcning for the arm. Woollen
543:
lace, the same colour as-the material, is also employed for
544:
this purpose. Others have deep flounces pinked in a large»
545:
pattern, or simply edgéd:with a narrow chicorée, or a'small
546:
plaiting of ribbon at the-edge and top of the flotinces:. Bet.
547:
plain pardessus, entively- coveted, embroidered; and trimned!
548:
with a very deep, rich, and lizht fringes The eifect of this
549:
embroidery and fr:nges-may be compared to the beautifl
550:
China crapces..
551:
THE HUDDERSFIELD CHRONICLE, SATURDAY, MAY 4, 1850.
552:
ears
553:
TIGER-TRAPPING AT PORT NATAL.
554:
We have now before us a series of most interesting let-
555:
ters from a spirited offshot of a worthy family residing
556:
within one hundred miles of Saddleworth, whose love of
557:
adventure and daring spirit induced him to emigrate, in
558:
the August of 1848, to the colony of Natal. He was ac-
559:
companied by the wife of his heart, and a sister, whose
560:
courage seems (according to the narrative which follows, )
561:
to have fully equalled his own. All the party arrived safely
562:
at their destination at the end of 1848, and after various
563:
rambles in the country, to survey the game, with the view
564:
£6 the selection of a suitable spot for a residence, he finally
565:
purchased a site within view of the sea, and about fourteen
566:
miles south of Durban,-the port of Natal. His farm con-
567:
tains about 100 acres of land, equal to' any in the colony.
568:
The letters before us abound with valuable information
569:
on matters well calculated to give intending emigrants
570:
some accurate ideas respecting this colony, We purpose,
571:
therefore, extracting from them occasionally, as our space
572:
will admit, but, in the first instance cannot resist transferring
573:
to our pages his lively sketch of the unsuccessful attempts he
574:
made at trapping a tiger. He thus describes the mode in
575:
which he sought to secure his nocturnal visitor :-=
576:
It is only 7 o'clock, and a short:time ago we set the tiger
577:
trap. The hen has fluttered and screamed, the trap-dvor
578:
has fallen, and some creature-inside has been attempting to
579:
escape. I have just sat down from loading the ritie,-the
580:
double barrel with buck shot, and an old rifle' with the
581:
same: Uncertain-what may happen-before I conclude my
582:
history of tiger-catching, I will extract portions from my
583:
diary connected therewith.
584:
March 20. - From the garden I went to the traps to see
585:
if any wild animal was imprisoned. I had heard the
586:
smaller door fall down during the night, but postponed a
587:
visit till morning. I found the trap had worked: as it was
588:
intended to do, and that some animal had been: caught. A
589:
hole-under one side-the soil around smoothed as if a soft
590:
sleek body hb been drawn along it, and some fur of various
591:
colours adhering to the woodwork, were-evidehces: of both
592:
capture and escape. Very annoying to find my ingenimus
593:
work wanting in completeness, [ drove in wooden stakes to
594:
block up the outlet, and if the creature is foolish enough
595:
to come again, I hope to have a sight cfit. It never ca:ne
596:
again. During the intervals between the dates of these
597:
extracts I punctually baited the large trap.
598:
Tuesday, Agtil 3. - I have taken a cask into the bush
599:
and made it into a tiger-trap: April 7. - Took my trap
600:
further into the bush, as it did not ehjoy coveted visits
601:
when fixed on the skirts of the forest. Monday, Aprii 23.
602:
e all-engrossing subject of our thoughts is the tiger
603:
by which we are visited every night. On Thursday nicht
604:
he came for the first time, and clutched, through a hole in
605:
the cote roof, at a fowl. His claws sunk deep into its back,
606:
and it fell screaming to the ground, where we found it next
607:
Morning stiff end-cokdi- The following night the: fowls
608:
would not lodge in the cote, but spite of all our missles
609:
would settle in the trees. I made a hole in the back of the
610:
house through which I could watch the trap-door, and in
611:
the trap I fastened two hens, having a string proceeding
612:
from the trap-door to my side, which I purposed to cut so
613:
:as to fasten the animal, should he venture in. I kept
614:
.watch' ti two o'clock, and distinctly heard his climbing
615:
the trees, and leapimy to the ground with his unfortunate
616:
victims; whose screams;- waxing fainter and fainter, in-
617:
formed me which way he went: to eat them at his ease.
618:
 : Bobby (the horse) occasionally started, and no wonder, for
619:
the animal was close to him in climbing to the perched
620:
ones overhead. How I shivered with colt: in waiting for
621:
the hour when he would proceed to the trap: He did not
622:
go, so I went to freeze my wife. The night following,
623:
which would be our " Cotters' Saturday Night," I was pre-
624:
pared as usual. He came unusually early; [ was arduously
625:
reaping my beard at the time, and he entered the trap for'
626:
one of the fowls, and carried it off in triumph, my trap-
627:
door failing'as' he-bounded:away. Out we went and re-set
628:
our machinery. YF gazel-mest- intensely through the loop-
629:
 : hole'; j¢-was-dark, and I could not see him approach, but
630:
immediately there was a loud scream and a fluttering in
631:
the trap, so I cut my string, and saw a large whity-looking
632:
beast give two or three leisurely springs away as if but
633:
slightly startled. We went again and found the trap
634:
empty; two nice hens were gone, and sir tiger was off.
635:
With drooping spirits we went to bed. In the middle of
636:
. the nist; dem heard: hiss rustling round the cote, but he
637:
departed after she had louilly called for me.
638:
On the Sabbath evening I returned to: the self-acting
639:
principle, which had been very foolishly abandoned ; but
640:
either through being frightened away by the unusual and
641:
astonishing visit of my bullocks, who trampled through the
642:
garden, ate off some bean tops, rubbed their heavy necks
643:
on the front railing, frightened my wife almost sick, who
644:
thought the tiger was prowling round, and stared most in-
645:
nocently at the lantern which I took with me in driving
646:
them away, and upbraiding their most untimely disturbance,.
647:
or through the otherwise clirectine influence of Providence,
648:
he did not come near us that night. A most critical and
649:
unfortunate train of events, which excited my hopes and
650:
eelings to 2 high degree, and thus left me sickened and sad.
651:
> I? must here interrupt my quotations in order to state
652:
that' the protracted silence about the trap gave rise to
653:
doubts as'to the capture of the beast.. He must be- gone,
654:
said my 'two-companions; and Sarah wished to startle him
655:
with a match. I recommended a watchman's rattle which
656:
was in the house, and Ellen lustily sounded it, but there
657:
was no response from the hackside. I then left my letter-
658:
writing, lighted the lantern, and went to see the truth, ac-
659:
companied by brave Ellen. We cautiously approached,
660:
scrutinizing most carefully, and just as I had come to the
661:
opinion that I could see a crouching animal inside, Ellen
662:
'caught. up seme' soil and: threv' it against the trap'; and
663:
such a growl was elicited by that contemptuous deed, so
664:
deep, heavy, and guttural a snarl, that, taken by surprise,
665:
she started off with reckless velocity, stumbling over a
666:
large jagged stone that lay in the way, but continuing in
667:
motion through fear ; and, to tell the truth, I followed her
668:
example with complimentary promptitude. Sarah held
669:
the door like a protecting angel, and when we had got in-
670:
side, slammed the door to with an energy that placed the
671:
hinges in jeopardy.
672:
1 will now proceed with-anether quotaticn or two :-Tues-
673:
"day, - Last night the prowler 'paid us anothor visit, entercé!
674:
the trap, took the luscious bait, and-maie his escape! The
675:
entanglements of the hen impeded the quick working of the
676:
trap-door. Wednesday. - We set the trap, and in the middle
677:
of the night, heard the fowl scream, the door fall, and the
678:
tiger bound away. He took one of two chickens in the
679:
trap and wounded the other to death. These escapades
680:
were most bitterly annoying te me, tat I was upheld' by
681:
'hope, and' the day fetlowing lengthened the trap. It was
682:
now evident that the animal stretched out its paw to seize
683:
the fowls, and, being a notedly large one, would have its
684:
back underneath the door, and so be able to retreat,
685:
Management has to be learnt, so I made a firm enlarge-
686:
ment. (the trap is now nearly three yards long.) In the
687:
middle of the night we were awoke by the fluttering of the
688:
bait, and heard the scratching and rubbing of some impri-
689:
soned creature. My sister and I went out, carrying a lan-
690:
tern, and proceeded to the trap. When nearly at. it we
691:
were appalled by a loud, hoarse, furious growl-from. the
692:
tiger within, who became maddened by our near approaehi-
693:
I hastily placed a tree stump and a deal-plank against tie
694:
quivering door, and then we retreated into the house: we
695:
could thence hear the redoubled efforts of the brute by the
696:
crashing of wood-work, as if he would escape. The frantic
697:
dissuasions of my wife prevented my going to make the
698:
door more secure, and-I and Ellen only went to the corner
699:
of the house. Our appearance had great effect upon the
700:
animal; he struggled and growled fiercely, and as we
701:
rather shrunk beek, burst out with a heavier roar and
702:
rushed towards: the forest. It was perhaps well that we
703:
were so far from him. His dreadful growls haunt my:
704:
memory yet, and rather intimidate my spirit: he musé be:
705:
a large tiger; and to break the door, tear strong: wiré
706:
away, andbend large nails, he must have formidable claws.
707:
Portions of his fur were left on the jagged wood-work over
708:
which he: desperately dragged his body when escaping.
709:
This-was the crowning mishap-the climactric of our mis-
710:
fortunes in the wild-beast line. To have captured and then
711:
lost him-to have worked, and schemed, and watched so
712:
long, and so much, only to be mortitied with the cup of re-
713:
werd'falling from my greedy lips, was enough to strengthen
714:
my sickness and make me doubly languid. Saturday. - I
715:
am:very weakly yet, and the throes of my bowels are quite?
716:
ing. Yesterday I managed to make another trap-
717:
deer, strong, heavy, and plated with iron; it will:resist
718:
all. clawing. I was unable to go to the field; &c.. I was
719:
Pleased to see my men paying even more atiention than
720:
usual to their duties, as if they took an inéércst in my sick-.
721:
ness. From the night of his temporary durance to the pre- -
722:
sent time, we have constantly set the'trap, and at last tho
723:
silly creature is fust again. Day fellowing. - After -we pot
724:
tb bed the tiger commenced his désperate efforts:to oscape.
725:
Time, time, time after thae he' threw -himself against the
726:
plated door, but his claws rung a the
727:
iron. I strove in vain to-4%W- asleep, and; had-te hear his
728:
struygles till half-past-cne.. A.while after that hour I fell
729:
asleep, but was aweke.by Eten, who heard tbe bullocks in
730:
the garden (they, were Mr. Suutham's) ; ske-said she had
731:
heard the tiger cacape under the dour. I comld not believe
732:
it, but in the.morniug the outrageously mortifying fact was:
733:
can be laid: on.
734:
3
735:
evident. Constant and stron - efforts maintained for six
736:
hours had been rewarded success. We found that
737:
after his escape he had gone into the cotehouse and wor-
738:
ried a hen, which, a week ago, had hatched eight chickens.
739:
Poor things, how they chirp and seek for their mother ;
740:
they hear other hens calling for their own broods, and thev
741:
hurry towards them, but are driven rudely away. I enter-
742:
tain a hope, after all disappointments, of securing thé
743:
monster. I will barricade him effectually when again
744:
caught, and if at all needful, will stand sentry over him till
745:
daylight, though the nights are dreadfully cold.
746:
(To be continued. )
747:
ANOTHER ANECDOTE OF THE EX-Railway Kine. - We
748:
have been informed by a spectator that, one day last week,
749:
when Mr. Hudson was boldly walking on the platform of
750:
the Midland Railway, at Derby, he was assailed by a
751:
respectable-looking person, who loudly rated him for having
752:
by his infamous tricks and frauds, deluded and robbed his
753:
sister of all her money. The opprobrious names he called
754:
him, and the pertinacity with which he stuck to him,
755:
finally drove the ex-king to shelter in one of the carriages.
756:
What have the gentlemen of the House of Commons to say
757:
to this }-Liverpool Mercury.
758:
EXHIBITION OF 1851. - REGULATIONS REGARDING THE
759:
EXHIBITION OF MACHINERY IN Mortox. - The commis-
760:
sioners for the exhibition of 1851, being desirous of affording
761:
every facility to those persons who may wish to exhibit
762:
machines or trains of machinery in motion, have resolved to
763:
allow such machinery to be managed and worked, as tar as'
764:
practicable, under the superintendance'of the owners, anc¥
765:
by their own'men. The commissioners will also find steam,
766:
not exceeding 301IB per inch, gratuitously to the exhibitors,
767:
and convey it, in clothed pipes, to such parts of the building
768:
as require steam power. Parties sending machines or arti-
769:
cles requiring to be driven by steam, should send with the
770:
same a small portable steam-engine, to which a steam-pips
771:
The above will apply to all engines trora
772:
one-horse power to six horses', beyond which power, it is
773:
presumed, no single branch of manufacture, or article, wiil
774:
require steam power. As regards machines too small to re-
775:
quire an independant portable engine, arrangements will
776:
be made to place them'in-groups, to be exhibited in commn-
777:
nication with some steam engine, also'sent for exhibition, in
778:
motion.. Exhibitors proposing to exhfbit portable steam
779:
engines, should understand that their engines may be em-
780:
ployed for driving other machinery, unless the owners of the
781:
steam engines object to such use.
782:
MYSTERIOUS ROBBERY ZND Murper. - On Sunday, he-
783:
tween one and two o'clock, a rumour rapidly spread
784:
throughout that part of the parish of Clapham lying nea"
785:
to the Wandsworth Road, that a murder and robbery ha l
786:
taken place that morhing during the hours of divine servie+,
787:
at the house of Mr. John Maddle, Claremont Place,
788:
Wandsworth Road, and that the person murdered was that
789:
gentleman's housekeeper. At a few minutes to eleven
790:
o'clock Mr. Maddle left his house to attend divine servies
791:
at Clapham Church. Mr. Maddle returned shortly atter
792:
one o'clock, and ringing the bell at the gate several times
793:
and'finding he could make no one hear, he went round tu
794:
the garden gate, which, to his surprise, was unfastene:t.:
795:
He went in. The washhouse door was open, as also the'
796:
back kitchen, and he was almost paralysed at behol-ding
797:
his housekeeper lying on her back in the front kitchen, he-
798:
legs extending over the threshold of the door, and her head
799:
lymg towards the French windows that open into the area
800:
in front of the house. Her right lee was partly drawn up
801:
under the body, and entangling the foot, which was with-
802:
out a shoe (which is missing), was a coil of rope used in
803:
hanging out clothes ; her head rested on six or seven folds
804:
of carpeting, and within six inches of the head was a basin
805:
containing about a pint of clean water. The face, hands,
806:
and other parts of the bo:ly were cold. There was not the
807:
smallest contortion of features, nor, so far as was observe,
808:
any marks of personal violence. The eyes were close'l as if
809:
in sleep, and but for the ghastly expression of the face it
810:
could. have-hardly been imagined but she slept. On enter-
811:
ing the house, Mr. Maddle had found-it in a state of crest
812:
disorder, and very soon discovered that a gold watch, some
813:
jewellery, consisting of rings, &c., and some plate, hail
814:
been carried off. From subsequent information obtainel
815:
by Inspector Coleman and his men, it would appear thas
816:
two men were seen ina bye-road; near the rear of the
817:
house, at about twenty minutes past twelve o'clock at noon.:
818:
Between: eleven and twelve o'clock a man was lookin
819:
about the bye lane, and lay down in the grass in the rea>
820:
of the house. Another man, about the same time, way
821:
seen near the spot. At the inquest held: on Monday, Mr.
822:
Purot, the surgeon who made a post mortem examination
823:
of the body, deposed that he found no marks of violence or
824:
smell as if poison had been administered ; and he hal been
825:
:altogether unable to ascertain the cause of death. There
826:
was an appearance of recent and active inflammation of the
827:
stomach, but that would not account for the death. H.
828:
had not, however, made an analysis of the contents cf the
829:
stomach. Mr. Maldlc, the deceased's master, was ex:-
830:
mined, and gave evidence to the effect stated in the pre-
831:
vious particulars. He declared, in a very excited manner,
832:
'his conviction that she' had been murdered. It was thea
833:
suggested to the coroner, by Mr. Superintendent bickne!),
834:
that it would defeat the ends of justice if the inquiry w:.s
835:
further proceeded with at present. 'the coroner then ad-
836:
journed the inquiry till Monday next ; and in the mein
837:
time an analysis will be made of the intestines.
838:
Oo
839:
COURT OF BANKRUPTCY FOR THE LEEDS
840:
DISTRI
841:
Before Mr. Commissioner Ayrtcn,
842:
Monday, May 6th. - William Stubbs, innkeeper, Chape'-
843:
town, near Lecds, last examination and proof of debts, at
844:
11. Samuel Firth, draper, Leeds, first audit at 11.
845:
TUESDAY, May 7th. - Blackburn, Pickles, and CO., cotton
846:
spinnets, Ibbott' Roya' Mill; Wadsworth, near Halifax, cer-
847:
tificate, at 11. Richard Noble and George. May, fancy
848:
cloth manufacturers. Almondbury, last examination, a:!
849:
journed from 8th April, at 11.
850:
WEDNESDAY, May 8th (at the Town Hall, Hull). - John
851:
Young, innkeener, Manby, Lincolnshire, last examination
852:
and proof of debts, at half-past 10. Frederick Johnson,
853:
watch-maker, Lincoln, last examination, adjourned frova
854:
27th March, and proof of debts, at halfpast 10. T. Mi.
855:
Adams, corn-factor, Ho!ton-le-Beckering, Lincolnshire,
856:
second audit,. at half-past 10..
857:
Before Mr. Commissioner West.
858:
Taunspay, May 9th. - Joseph Smith and Robert Smit},
859:
fancy cloth manufacturers, Kirkbmrton, andit separace
860:
estates of both bankrupts. William Lister Oddie, eutton
861:
spinner, Clitheroe, Lancashire, audit. John Houston, hoz
862:
keeper, Whitby, andit.
863:
FRIDAY, May 10th. - Jdsephi Smith and Robert Smi:h,
864:
fancy cloth manufacturers, Kirkburton, dividend and provt
865:
of debts, at 11. Wm. Lister Oddie, cotton spinner, U!-
866:
theroe, Lancashire, dividend and proof of debts, at 11.
867:
John Houston, hotel keeper, Whitby, dividend and prouf
868:
of debts, at 11.
869:
Saturpay, May 11 (at the Council Hall, Sheffelel). -
870:
Charles-Sandérsen, iron merchant, Sheffield, audit, at 10,
871:
George Hutton, grocer, &c., Sheitield, dividend and proot
872:
of debts; at'l0. Parker, Shore, and CO., bankers, She:-
873:
field, audit separate estate of Hugh Parker, at 10, Charies. -
874:
Pearson, licensed victualler, Shefiield, choice of assignees
875:
and 'proof of debts, at 10.
876:
FROM. THE LONDON GAZETTE..
877:
BANKRUPTS; Fropay, Aprit 26..
878:
William Chittendén, draper, Tarlington-place, and Church-
879:
street, Paddingicn, Middlesex.
880:
Charles Vinee; brtider, Tunbridge Wells, Kent.
881:
Ichn. Péttitison, grocer, Liverpool.
882:
Jokn- Stuiford and Henry Bannister, brickmakers, Tilfor',
883:
Hatesowen, Worcester.
884:
Alexunder Speers Carrick, timber dealer and broker, Bristo!,
885:
John Powell, cattle dealer, Upper Cakalva, Cilrow, Radnor.
886:
BANKRUPTCY ANNULLED.,
887:
Feter Mann, corn factor, Leeds..
888:
PARTNERSHIFS DISSOLVED.
889:
Bottomley and Farrar, Huddersfield, manufacturers of woollen
890:
cloth -Offley, Webber, Forrester, and CO., London, Liverpo:},
891:
Manchester; Choltenham, Sirmingham, and Bristol, ox. elsc-
892:
whercait Engiand.
893:
BANKRUPTS, Tuespay, Aprix: 30.:,
894:
William George Ceely, carman and omnibus propriéior, Colten-
895:
street, Poplar, Middlesex. ; ;
896:
James Drighton, livensel victualler, Globe pabiic-house, Deri, -
897:
street, Gray's Inn Rowl, Middlesex.
898:
Thomas Cullingwood, innkeeper, Nimeham, Corertney, Oxford,
899:
Anthony Edward Curvéi, baker; Haapstead Read and Lisson
900:
Grove, Middlesex. . .
901:
James Guest, commission agent, Birrainghass, .
902:
John Brown, -bitildca; Brisco. .
903:
James Ville; niuksetr, Ecckhampton,. aad' Cheltenbum,
904:
Gloucestershire.
905:
Charles Pé.s8e2; lidensed victualicy, Duke-street, Pork, Shut
906:
field,
907:
Conrad Greanbow; jun., timber-merchant, Neweastle-on-Tyn >.
908:
FARTNERSUIPS DISSOLVED.
909:
J Dugdale ard Brothers, Manchester and Burnley, Lancasbir .
910:
manuficturze-h. Wood and &. FS Knowles, Leeds, cumzon:

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