History of the Huddersfield Water Supplies (1939) - Chapter XI

The following is a transcription of a historic book and may contain occasional small errors.

History of the Huddersfield Water Supplies (1939) by T.W. Woodhead

Table of Contents:

  • Preface & Bibliography
  • Chapter I : Geology, Topography and Rainfall of the Huddersfield District
  • Chapter II : Early Water Supplies
  • Chapter III : Public Wells, Cisterns, and Watering Places — Private Supplies and Local Waterworks Companies.
  • Chapter IV : Waterworks Commissioners
  • Chapter V : Incorporation of the Borough — Waterworks Undertakings
  • Chapter VI : Underground Water Supplies — Boreholes
  • Chapter VII : Analysis and Bacteriological Examination of Water
  • Chapter VIII : Sources of Pollution
  • Chapter IX : Service Reservoirs
  • Chapter X : Testing and Inspection of Fittings, Pipes and Mains
  • Chapter XI : Statistics and Finance
  • Chapter XII : Need for Further Water Supplies

CHAPTER XI.

STATISTICS AND FINANCE.

AVERAGE CONSUMPTION OF WATER PER DAY FOR ALL PURPOSES, 1928–1938.

Year ending March 31st Domestic Trade Compensation Total
1928 3,984,819 2,118,871 3,043,559 6,103,690
1929 5,133,502 2,210,323 3,043,559 10,387,384
1930 4,221,872 1,927,054 3,043,559 9,192,485
1931 4,621,302 1,417,663 3,043,559 9,082,524
1932 4,969,393 1,462,445 3,043,559 9,475,397
1933 4,862,442 1,602,622 3,043,559 9,508,623
1934 4,731,224 1,818,926 3,043,559 9,593,709
1935 4,179,587 1,324,723 3,043,559 8,521,915
1936 4,688,473 1,680,536 3,043,559 9,412,568
1937 4,647,142 1,637,213 3,043,559 9,327,914
1938 4,635,122 1,985,854 3,043,559 9,664,535

The high consumption of water for the year ending March 31st 1929, was due to the prolonged frost which caused a large number of pipes to burst and the waste water was very considerable. The low consumption of water for the years 1931 to 1935 was due to cutting down the supply on account of drought. In 1934, from July 31st to November 5th, compensation water was reduced by half-a-million gallons a day.

The supply of about 28 gallons per head for domestic purposes is considered ample to meet local needs. Mr. H. Shortreed of the Leeds Corporation Waterworks Department, who has given much attention to the problem, regards 25 gallons per head per day of the population, can be looked upon as a fair average quantity and need not be exceeded if due attention be given to the prevention of waste. In many towns this amount is greatly exceeded. He concludes that "big consumptions were waste and not use." The consumption per head in the Huddersfield District of Supply is 27.97 gallons.

GROWTH OF WATERWORKS UNDERTAKING AT INTERVALS OF TEN YEARS.

Year Population
Supplied
Number
of gallons
per day
Receipts
1878 88,245 1,600,000 £21,098
1888 121,755 3,004,880 £47,143
1898 128,682 3,445,000 £51,632
1908 145,716 3,964,800 £62,210
1918 156,510 6,525,260 £112,057
1928 161,202 6,103,690 £147,160
1938 166,127 6,620,976 £171,105

In addition to the above quantities, 3,043,559 gallons of water is paid out from the various reservoirs as compensation, not including the Longwood Compensation Reservoir. This amount is varied in times of drought, as in 1929 and 1934.

Total capital expenditure down to 1918[1] £1,831,611 0s. 6d.
Total capital expenditure down to 1928 £1,990,935 10s. 5d.
Total capital expenditure down to 1938 £1,959,317 0s. 8d.
Net outstanding Debt 1938 £1,494,500 0s. 0d.
Annual Revenue £172,363 0s. 0d.
Surplus Profit £18,278 0s. 0d.
Reserve Fund Balance £109,031 0s. 0d.

STATISTICS OF COUNTY BOROUGH AND DISTRICT OF WATER SUPPLY.

Area of County Borough before extention in 1936 11,875 acres
Population, 1931 Census 113,475
Rateable Value, 1936 £847,394
Area of County Borough after extension, 1937 14,149 acres
Population (Estimated mid-year 1937) 123,030
Rateable Value, 1938 £946,648
Area of District of Water Supply (150 ft. O.D. to 1,244 ft. O.D.) 51,824 acres
Total Capacity of Reservoirs 1,715,000,000 gallons
Total Capacity of Service Reservoirs 11,918,937 gallons
Yield from Catchment Area (based on three dry years) 10,488,660 gallons
Houses supplied by Waterworks Undertaking 54,768
Population supplied Borough 115,869
Population supplied (1938) outside the Borough 50,258
Average number of houses added to mains for last nine years, per annum 995
Domestic Consumption of water per head 27.97 gallons
Average daily consumption for domestic and trade purposes 6,620,976 gallons
Average daily quantity of compensation water 3,043,559 gallons
Total daily needs — 1938 9,664,433 gallons
Length of trunk and distribution mains 426 miles

When the Digley Reservoir is completed, the present supply will be supplemented by about 600,000,000 gallons, in addition to which will be available the adjoining Bilberry Reservoir with a capacity of 67,000,000 gallons. There will then be a supply of approximately 2,396 million gallons, including the Service Reservoirs.

COUNTY BOROUGH OF HUDDERSFIELD CENSUS POPULATION

Supplied by Dr. J.M. Gibson, Medical Officer of Health.

Year Population
1831 36,732
1841 44,933
1851 54,073
1861 60,940
1871 70,253
1881 81,823
1891[2] 95,422
1901 95,056
1911 107,825
1921 110,102
1931 113,475
1937[3] 123,030

Continue to Chapter XII...

Notes and References

  1. Of which £31,586 was for Parliamentary expenses in connection with same.
  2. Includes the district of Longwood which was added in 1890, and had a census population in 1891 of 5,406 persons.
  3. Estimated population mid-year after extension of the County Borough in 1937.


History of the Huddersfield Water Supplies (1939) - Chapter XI

This page was last modified on 15 August 2015 and has been edited by Dave Pattern.

Search Huddersfield Exposed