Dungeon Cottages, Lockwood

Dungeon Cottages were a short row of properties situated below Dungeon Wood on the Lockwood and Meltham Turnpike, just before the access road to Dungeon Mill.

History

During the construction of the Meltham Branch Line, there was a substantial landslip in Dungeon Wood in February 1866 which caused structural damage to nearby houses and to the Dungeon Toll Bar. The Huddersfield Chronicle reported that "some of the inner walls of the houses cracks and fissures half an inch in width have appeared, while the doors which before shut easily, have had to be altered in order to make them close as before."[1] According to most histories of the branch line, the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Company were obliged to pay the cost of rebuilding the houses. Although these are not named specifically as being Dungeon Cottages, it seems highly likely as they were the nearest properties to the Toll Bar.

In November 1874, Willie Fox of Dungeon Cottages, son of stone mason James Fox, testified at the inquest into the apparent suicide of John Walter Abson, whose body "was found fearfully mutilated on the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway, in the Taylor Hill cutting, near Berry Brow." Fox had apparently been one of the last people to see Abson alive, after having walked with him from Lockwood to Dungeon Cottages. As there was no evidence to explain how Abson had ended up on the line, the inquest jury were unable to bring in a verdict of suicide.[2]

The first Huddersfield Corporation tramcar route in 1883 ran from Fartown to Lockwood. This was extended to include a terminus near Dungeon Cottages, which gave access to the nearby lower entrance to Beaumont Park. The extension was dismantled when it was decided in 1901 to only electrify the line as far as Lockwood.

In October 1903, the Leeds Mercury reported that the Last Will and Testament of waste dealer George Livesey, "of Dungeon Cottages, Lockwood", contained a large number of charitable bequests. His estate was valued at over £10,000.[3]

The properties seem to have been gradually demolished in the 1940s and 1950s, and appear to be entirely absent on the 1960 Ordnance Survey map.

Census Returns

1841 1 labourer Robert Spencer (65), slubber Benjamin Spencer (25), Mary Spencer (25) and Henry Spencer (1)
2 delver Jonathan Haigh (45), Martha Haigh (50), Ann Haigh (20), Lydia Haigh (15), blacksmith William Haigh (15) and John Haigh (10)
3 burler Mary Kemp (35), woollen piecer George Kemp (14), John Kemp (11), William Kemp (5), Crosland Kemp (2), woollen weaver Mary Stephens (25), clothier Jabus Donk (25) and cotton winder Ann Thorp (20)
4 John Simmons (25)[4], Elizabeth Simmons (25) and Ann Simmons (5)
5 fancy wool weaver William Brandsett (30), Catherine Brandsett (25) and Eliza Brandsett (1)
6 fancy wool weaver John Bates (35), Elizabeth Bates (35), Mary Bates (14), John Bates (10) and Betty Bates (6)
7 labourer George Boothroyd (46), Hannah Boothroyd (50), Betty Boothroyd (25), clothier William Boothroyd (23), clothier Joshua Boothroyd (20), clothier Benjamin Boothroyd (16) and Jane Boothroyd (13)
8 engineer James Roebuck (30), Elizabeth Roebuck (25), George Roebuck (5) and John Roebuck (3)
9 labourer Thomas Wood (40), Martha Wood (40), George Wood (13), William Wood (9), James Wood (7) and Mary Wood (3)
10 warehouseman Henry Crosland (25), Sarah Crosland (25) and Emma Crosland (3)
1851 1 overlooker Joseph Livesey (55), his wife Sarah (52), and their children Ann (28) and Abraham S. (13)
2 journeyman linen draper William Crowther (23) and his wife dressmaker Emma (23)
3 farm labourer Thomas Wood (52), his wife Martha (54), their children William (19) and Mary Ann (13), and visitor Ann Sykes (17)
4 labourer Henry Crosland (37), his wife Sarah (39), and their children Emma (12), Joe (6) and Sarah A. (2)
5 stone mason John Thornton (57), his wife (37), and their daughters Elizabeth (17) and Hannah (21)
6 woollen slubber George Boothroyd (59), his wife Hannah (61), and their children woollen slubber Benjamin (25) and woollen feeder Jane (23)
7 agricultural labourer Joshua Smith (26), his wife Elizabeth (27) and their daughter Emma (4)
8 woollen weaver Jonathan Whitwham (43), his wife Mary (26), and his children journeyman Joseph (21), Walter (19), Henry (14), Walker (12), Emma (9), Hiram (8) and Ellen (2)
9 journeyman blacksmith William Hanson (30), his wife Elizabeth (31), and their daughters Martha (3), Emma (1) and Eliza Furness (6)
10 cloth dresser Edmund Sykes (65), his wife Mary (50), and their children Amos (13), Hannah (12) and John (10)
11 woollen slubber Joshua Boothroyd (30), his wife Sarah (25) and their daughter Hannah (2)
12 woollen slubber Benjamin Spencer (35), his wife Mary (33), their children Henry (11), Joseph (8) and Ellen (5), and his father widower Robert (81)
13 weaver widower John Kaye (41) and his children Sarah (16), Jephthah (14), Mary A. (11), Martha (8), William H. (5) and Margaret (1)
1861 1 widow dressmasker Emma Crowther (72), and her children Helen (9), Fredrick (6) and Catherine E. (3)
2 woollen commercial clerk Abraham S. Livesey (23), his wife Caroline (23) and their daughter Florence (11 months)
3 woollen miller overlooker Joseph Livesey (65), his wife Sarah (63) and their daughter Ann (38)
4 road mender Thomas Wood (62), his wife Martha (64) and their daughter woollen cloth burler Mary A. (23)
5 widower woollen spinner Christopher Smith (49), and his children Hiram (19) and Mary Jane (17)
6 butler John Pattinson (32), his wife Hannah (38), and their children Robert J. (5) and Louisa (1)
7 stone breaker George Boothroyd (69), his wife Hannah (71), his sons widower stone breaker Joshua (39) and widower woollen slubber (34), and his granddaughter Hannah (13)
8 woollen cloth weaver Hannah Carter (30), and her sisters woollen cloth weavers Ellen (26) and Jane (23)
9 Wesleyan reformers circuit preacher John Craig (37), his wife Elizabeth (33), and the children Ann (8), Ellen (6) and George (3)
10 domestic coachman Hugh Clarkson (33), his wife Mary A. (29) and their daughter Mary (6)
11 painter James Crow (35), his wife cloth burler Betty (36), and his children Beaumont (3) and Emily (14)
12 widow woollen weaver Martha Whiteley (35), and her children Eliza (11), Elizabeth (10) and Thomas (4)
13 wool carder Benjamin Spencer (45), his wife Mary (45), and their children Henry (21), Joseph (18), Ellen (15), Robert (4) and Ingham (4)
14 dilapidated property
1871 1 stone mason James Fox (36), his wife Lucy Amelia (32), and their children Annie (13), Willie (7), Thomas A. (4) and Fred (4 months)
2 mechanic's labourer John Crowther (29) and his wife Ellen (25)
3 machine loom fitter Rushworth Horsfall (29) and his wife Mary Jane (26)
4 woollen manufacturer Joshua Haigh (46), his wife Nonny (47), and their children Fred (15), Emma (22) and Elizabeth (19)
5 woollen cloth designer William Pontefract (39) and his wife Ellen (33)
6 woollen warper Ingham Gledhill (27), his wife Sarah (26), and their children Eli (4), Betsy Ellen (3) and Annie (1)
7 whitesmith Thomas Smith (48), his wife Sarah (33), and their children John (12), Walter (8), Florence (5), Selina (2) and Tom (3 months)
8 wool moiter George Livesey (42) and his wife Elizabeth (36)
9 wool dyer Joe Priestley (28) and his wife Melinda (25)
10 woollen scribbling engineer Henry Spencer (31), his wife Catherine (31), and their children Ben (7), Mary H. (4) and Eliza (7 months)
11 woollen scribbling engineer Benjamin Spencer (55), his wife Mary, their sons Robert John (14) and Ingham (12), and their granddaughter Mary Ellen Crowther (5)
1881[5] 1 stone mason James Fox (46), his wife Lucy A. (42), and their children dressmaker Annie E. (23), joiner Willie (17), stone mason Thomas A. (14), Fred (10) and Lucy E. (5 months)
2 woollen weaver John A. Kaye (34), his wife Jane (32), and their children Ernest (8) and Constance W. (6)
3 scribbling engineer Robert John Spencer (24), his wife Louisa (30) and their daughter Edith A. (1)
4 woollen merchant's wife Hannie Haigh (58), her daughter Elizabeth (29), and her grandson B.A.L.H. Haigh[6] (7 months)
5 power loom overlooker Noble Hinchcliffe (43), his wife Emma (43), and their children Annie (17), Richard (15), Ada (13), Fred B. (12) and Herbert (9)
6 woollen warper foreman Ingham Gledhill (37), his wife Sarah (36), and their children Eli (14), Betsey E. (13), Annie (11), Marth (6), Rose A. (4) and Herbert H. (1)
7 mechanic Tom Smith (58), his wife Sarah J. (48), and their children labourer John E. (22), labourer Walter (18), Florence (14), Alena (12), Tom (10), George (8), Caroline (6) and Kate (1)
8 mill operative George Livesey (51) and his wife Elizabeth (46)
9 widow shopkeeper Eliza Thornton (33), and her children Mary A. (9) and Harry (7)
10 widower worsted mender Catherine Spencer (42), and his children Ben (17), Mary H. (14) and Eliza (10)
11 scribbling engineer Benjamin Spencer (65), his wife Mary (65), their son card cleaner Ingham (22), and their grandson Joe (5)
1891 1 night watchman Allen Haigh (47), his wife Emma L. (45), and their children Louisa (18) and Harry (8)
2 uninhabited
3 iron turner David Hirk (36), his wife Elizabeth (34), and their children confectioner's assistant George (15), shoemaker's assistant John (13), gardener's assistant Harry (12), Mary E. (11), Joe (9), Martha H. (7) and Arthur (5)
4 Elizabeth Haigh (39), Bertram A.L. Haigh (10), and domestic servant Emily Hardy (21)
5 woollen manufacturer Ralph Wood (35), his wife Annie (30), and their children Joshua (9), Sarah E. (7), Maud M. (3) and Philip (1)
6 widow Martha Henworthy (64), and her sons warehousemen Thomas W. (34) and Benjamin (21)
7 railway signalman Samuel Frement (30) and his wife Martha (31)
8 widow barber Catherine Spencer (51), and her children mill hand Ben (27), mill hand Eliza (20) and bread baker Joe (15)
9 signalman George H. Hirst (32) and his wife Lavinia (29)
10 waste dealer George Livesey (61) and his wife Elizabeth (56)
11 woollen carder Benjamin Spencer (75), his wife Mary (75) and their son card fettler Ingham (33)
1901 1 chemical warehouseman James Simpson (31), his wife Kate Agnes (33), and their children Donald (5) and Annie (1)
2 woollen warehouseman Tom Vickerman (40), his wife Annie (38), and their children plumber's office boy Ernest (15) and Nellie (9)
3 mill engine tenter Allen Gledhill (45), his wife Jane (45), and their children woollen mender Florence (19), Joe (16) and Mary Alice (12)
4 widow Martha Spencer (73), and her children woollen weaver Eliza (46) and warehouseman Joseph (32)
5 cotton turner Shepherd Hill (44), his wife Mary Jane (37), and their children cotton piecer Tom Arthur (13), Mary (10), John Albert (8), Hannah Louisa (6), Harold (4) and Gertrude Emma (1)
6 worsted weaver's overlooker Joseph Wood (44), his wife Susannah (41) and their son James Radcliffe Spence (15)
1911[7] 1 woollen spinner Robert Brown (37), his wife Emily (36), and their children worsted machine oiler Robert (16), worsted winder Mabel (15), worsted winder Annie (13) and Wilfred (10)
2 heating engineer Henry Milner (25) and his wife costume tailoress Lilian (28)
3 cloth manufacturer engineer Allen Gledhill (55), his wife Jane (55), and their children Joe (26) and Mary Alice (22)
4 woollen weaver John Holmes (62), his wife Sarah Anna (52) and their stepson Wilfred Mills (14)
5 carriage and motor painter George Frederick Dewhirst (24) and his wife Charlotte Elizabeth (23)

Location

Notes and References

  1. "Slip of Foundations at Lockwood" in Huddersfield Chronicle (10/Feb/1866).
  2. "Fatality on the Railway and Inquest" in Huddersfield Chronicle (24/Nov/1874).
  3. This was a considerable amount of money, perhaps worth the modern equivalent of around £1,000,000. Although Livesey had indeed lived at Dungeon Cottages, the 1901 Census listed him at 77 Woodfield Road. Leeds Mercury (30/Oct/1903).
  4. Occupation appears to read "frame knitter".
  5. The 1881 Census does not specifically name the properties as "Dungeon Cottages", however many of the residents are the same as in 1871.
  6. Bertram Augustus L.H. Haigh
  7. Properties named as "Park Valley Cottages" in the 1911 Census.

Dungeon Cottages, Lockwood

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Buildings | Buildings in Lockwood
This page was last modified on 28 June 2017 and has been edited by Dave Pattern.

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