Milton Congregational Church: Jubilee Souvenir (1931)

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Milton Congregational Church

Queen Street South

HUDDERSFIELD

JUBILEE SOUVENIR

loo 4954

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1A

Photo by Dent, Burlington House, Huddersfield. MILTON CONGREGATIONAL

CHURCH, HUDDERSFIELD

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Photo by Dent, Burlington House, Huddersfield.

FOREWORD

By Tue Rev. Hersert Stock, Minister.

The very word “ Jubilee’ suggests rejoicing. It speaks of gratitude and praise, of blessings received, of services rendered. It marks not only a definite period of time but also a wonderful chapter in history. I I These fifty years are laden with the rich experiences of devoted men and women whose early sacrifices in building Milton Church and School were followed by continued faithfulness in Christian worship. This generation enters into the heritage of the past with the same spiritual resources and with the same capacity for heroism and zeal. We read with*reverence and admiration the story of courage and vision revealed by those who believed with all their heart in the guiding hand of God and in the saving and sustaining grace of our Lord. We have seen how their faith was justified and how well their work was done. The inspiration of the past is upon us, and our obvious response to its challenge is to believe in the continuance of the everlasting Love of God, which never fails, never ages, and never changes. Its brilliant light is shining across our life to-day. Its message is urging us to go forward, The needs of men are still as great as ever, and the greatest need of all is for that gospel which for fifty years has been so faithfully proclaimed from the pulpit of Milton Church, To this task of building up the Kingdom of God let us bend our energies, for the beauty of the Lord is upon us and the glory of the Lord is round about us, HERBERT STOCK,

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INTERIOR OF MILTON CHURCH.

OUR JUBILEE EFFORT

When the Church met to consider the worthiest way to celebrate the Jubilee it decided on consolidation rather than expansion. A feeling of profound thank- fulness to those who built upon solid foundations reminded us that our duty is to lay foundations for those who follow.

We decided to purchase the site of the Church and Schools and free the

Church for ever from the burden of paying £100 a year for ground rent, leaving the money to be diverted into more useful channels.

The Appeal is for £2,000

and all the Societies connected with the Church have heartily adopted the scheme and pledged themselves to support it.

Towards the above amount we have £1,200 promised. We earnestly invite all who peruse this handbook and have sympathy with our work and our workers to assist us in this fine effort.

To old “ Miltonians ’” we would say, “ If you feel that present blessings, old associations and memories leave you with any sense of indebtedness, please send us a tangible token of it.”

All contributions to the Jubilee Fund should be forwarded to the Secretary : Mr. Norman Revell, 12, Forrest Avenue, Marsh, Huddersfield ; or to the Treas- urers : Mr. Frank Revell, 18, Forrest Avenue, Marsh, Huddersfield ; Mr. Arthur Riding, 36, Water Street, Huddersfield.

Cheques should be made payable to The Treasurer, Milton Church. 5

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PROGRAMME OF EVENTS

MILTON CHURCH JUBILEE, FEBRUARY 1931.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7th—Tea and Conversazione in the Assembly Hall. Old Miltonians and Friends specially invited.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8th—Preacher: Rev. J. D. Jones, D.D. (Bournemouth).

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY |0th—Service of Thanksgiving,

Speakers—Rev. A. H. Moncur Sime, of Penzance. Rev. B. A. of Bude. Rev. J. W. G. Dew, of West Bromwich.

Communion Service conducted by Rev. HERBERT STOCK. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY Public Meeting in Milton Assembly Hall. SuNDAY, FEBRUARY |5th—Preacher: Rev. Luke BEAUMONT (Southport).

(Fuller announcements later).

JUBILEE SALE OF WORK April 15th, 16th & 18th, 1931.

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Officers of the Church & Congregation

Pastor

Rev. HERBERT STOCK, The Ings, King’s Mill Lane.

Deacons

Term expires May, 1931.

J. H. GranamM FRED HAIGH Miss WooDHEAD J. W. SENIOR Term expires May, 1932 ERNEST WooDHEAD N. H. REVELL CHARLES HIRsT A. SINCLAIR. Term expires May, 1933 I I H. S. Brice Mrs. T. Ripinc Mrs. T. Sykes ERNEST GRAHAM

Church Secretary—H. S. Bricc, 207, Newsome Road. Communion Fund Treasurer—J. W. SeNior, 166, Victoria Road, Lockwood.

Managing Committee for 1930.

H. Armirtace, B.Sc. N. H. ReveLi H. BENNETT A. RipINc H. S. Brice A. SINCLAIR H. DickINson E. L. STAFForpD J. H. Granam J. H. Srarrorp F. Haicu J’ W. SyKxes CHARLES Hirst W. WILKINSON J. H. Lee F. Woop ANNIE MARSDEN A. L. Woopueap, M.A., J.P.

F. E. Reve, C.A. Ernest Woopueab, M.A., J.P.

Secretary—Norman H. 12, Forrest Avenue, Marsh. Treasurer—F. E. 18, Forrest Avenue, Marsh. Subscription Treasurer—H. 33, Storths Road, Birkby. Collection Stewards—H. Dickinson, A. Ripinc and J. W. SyYKEs.

Worship

SUNDAY :

Morninc AT 10-30. EVENING AT 6-30. Sunpay Morninc, CHILDREN’S CHorr aT 9-50. SuNDAY SCHOOL AT 2-15.

Tue Cuurcu MEetiNc is held on the Wednesday Evening before the first Sunday of the month.

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SUNDAY SCHOOL

——

President—REeEv. HERBERT STOCK. Superintendent—Mr. J. H. LEE. Vice-S uperintendents—Messrs. E. GRAHAM, L. M. Sykes and H. BENNETT. Secret ary—J. SYKES. Assistait Secretary—P. S. OLDFIELD. Treasurer—A. RIDING.

Superintendent of Junior ... Muss CALVERT. Vice-Superintendent of Junior Department ... Miss Harrison. Superintendent of Primary Department... Muss J. BENNETT. Superintendent of Kindergarten Department ... Miss L. Townenp. Choir.

President—A. L. Woopueap, M.A., J.P. Vice-President—J. B. Fox. Organist and Choirmaster—H. Armitace, B.Sc. Deputy Organist—M. Hatey. Secretary—A. RIDING. Librarians—F. Dickinson, E. BoTTOMLEY and W. BrumMITrT.

—_—

Women’s Guild of Christian Service.

President—Mrs. HAvILanD. Secretary—Mrs. SHAW. Treasurer—Mks. FRost. The Guild meets every month in the Milton Room.

Band of Hope.

Superintendent—E. GRAHAM. Secretary—Miss BENNETT. Treasurer—Miss Dorotuy KeErsHaw. Meetings held alternate Wednesday evenings.

Poor Children’s Treat. Secretaries—Miss I]. BENNETT and Mr, Joun H. Lee.

The Senior Classes of the Sunday School provide a Christmas Treat for about 250 poor children every year. This charitable work has been carried on since the

Church was built.

Milton Church Flowers Fund. Secretary—Mkrs. SuTCLIFFE.

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P.S.A. BROTHERHOOD.

Service in the Church every Sunday, 3 to 4 o'clock. President—Rev. HERBERT STOCK. Vice-Presidents—F. Haicu, W. ScHoFIELD, J. W. Senior, E. Woopueap, M.A., J.P. Treasurer—Henry NortTHu. Secretary—H. WILKINSON. Registrar—ALBERT WALSH.

Adult Provident Union. President—Rev. HERBERT STOCK. Treasurer—J. B. Fox. Secretary—RICHARD DIckINson, 25, Corporation Houses, Highroyd, Moldgreen.

Assistant and Junior Secretary—Harry DIcKINSON.

ny

LONDON MISSIONARY SOCIETY.

Secretary—Miuss CALVERT. Magazine Secretary—Muiss K. JoHNSTON.

Collectors—Mrs. PARKIN, Misses CALVERT, GILL and WIMPENNY, Mrs. NorMan ReEveLL (Women’s Missions).

Cricket Club. President—Rev. HERBERT STOCK. Treasurer—H. Bower. Secretary—J. H. Owen.

Milton Church Men’s Institute. President—Rev. HERBERT STOCK. Secretary—J. H. Owen. Treasurer—W. WILKINSON. The Institute and Billiard Room are open every week-night in the Winter

months and all members of the Church and Congregation, School, and P.S.A. are eligible to join.

Girl Guides (41st Huddersfield Company). Captain—N. Sykes. Lieutenant—M. TIFFANY. Company meetings, Thursday, 7-0 p.m.

Brownies. Brown Owl—G. TIFFANY. Pack meeting, Thursday, 6-0 p.m.

Congregational Magazine Secretaries—Miss C. and Mr. J. W. Senior.

Collectors for Outside Objects.

Yorkshire Congregational Union—Miss WoopueaD.

Yorkshire United Independent College—Mr. J. W. SENtor. Huddersfield and District Congregational Council—Mr. Norman H. REVELL.

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Photo: A. Clara Cooper, Edgbaston. Photo: Darby, West Bromwich. Rev. B. A. MILLARD Rev. J. W. G. DEw I9I14—1918 1919—1927

“IN RETROSPECT.” My Dear FRIENDS, I am asked to make a contribution to this Jubilee Handbook as the oldest survivor of a small company of representative men worshipping at Ramsden Street Chapel, who, after the decision of Vice-Chancellor Hall in 1881, “ that the Rev. John Turner Stannard did not adhere to the Schedule of doctrine contained in the Ramsden Street Chapel Trust Deed,” resolved to found a Church on a more enlightened and liberal basis. The exodus from Ramsden Street Chapel to the Victoria Hall was supported by the major portion of the Church and Sunday School, and the work and worship were carried on with efficiency and success in spite of inadequate premises. Steps were immediately taken to secure a suitable site for the building of a Church and School, and eventually the present position was selected. Looking back over the 50 years I am more than ever convinced that the action taken in 1881 by Mr. Stannard’s supporters has been amply justified by the effect upon the whole Congregational body and by the work Milton Church has done in the town. It is a happy reflection to know that nearly 1,000 persons have been asso- ciated with the Church as members, and upwards of 3,000 young people have passed through the Sunday School. It is impossible to estimate the far-reaching in fluence of the service rendered by Milton Church during these 50 years. My earnest prayer is that the good work which has been carried on for so long may be continued by those whose privilege it is to enter into such a precious heritage. Yours sincerely,

CHARLES HIRST. 19

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CONGRATULATIONS

From Rev. S. M. Berry, M.A., D.D. MemoriAL Hatt, Lonpon.

‘ T should like to associate myself with all the old friends of Milton Church in the rejoicings which will mark the Jubilee of the Church.

~ This book will tell of some of the memories of the years, but it is impossible to recapture all of them, or to measure the greatness of the work which has been done.

My earnest hope is that through the inspiration of old memories the scheme on which the Church has embarked may be triumphantly successful, and that Milton will have as rich and fruitful a witness to give during the next fifty years as it has had during the last.”’ M. Berry.

(Secretary Congregational Union of England and Wales).

From Rev. W. J. McAdam, M.A. LEEDS.

‘Fifty years of devoted service for the Kingdom of God is a matter for great thanksgiving and I am very glad to be associated in some small measure with your rejoicings. The Milton Church is to be heartily congratulated on its honourable record and upon all that it has accomplished since its formation. It is good sometimes to look backward and to gain courage and inspiration from the past. This Jubilee Year will be a time of remembrance. The thing that matters supremely, however, is the response that the Church is making to the call of God in this present time. It is with great thankfulness that we recognize the present achievements of the Milton Church, which give the assurance that the best is yet to be. All good wishes.”’ W. J. McApam.

(Moderator, North East Province).

From Rev. Matthew Stanley. LIGHTCLIFFE, YORKS.

It is a great pleasure to be invited to contribute a few words to the Jubilee Handbook. I remember being sent from College to preach at Ramsden Street Church the Sunday after Mr. Stannard left and naturally had my attention called to the movement which received so much public attention at the time. I watched Mr. Stannard’s career with interest and sympathy and a few years later in two successive years I had the pleasure of conducting a week’s special evangelistic services at Milton and have often been honoured by preaching there.

I congratulate the Milton friends on the stand they made and on the fine way they then and ever since have served the cause of religious freedom, especially in our Churches. They fought bravely in the front line, bore the weight of the strong attack, and now when the battle is virtually won I hope Milton will rejoice in the past and go on and prosper.” MATTHEW STANLEY,

(Chairman of the Yorkshire Congregational Unio2). 21

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CONGRATULATIONS —continued.

From Rev. Russel Tricker.

‘You are to be congratulated on your origin and on the attainment of your jubilee. You have had a glorious history. When I think of your beginnings, and of the way in which your founders stood fast to high principles, I feel like exclaiming, * magnificent Milton!’ All honour to the memory of John Turner Stannard, who, in face of opposition and persecution, fearlessly held to his vision of truth and the finest things of Congregationalism ! All honour to the men who stood by him, and who builded him an House where he might preach the Word in truth and in love, and where they might worship God intelligently as well as devoutly.

You have had fifty years of glorious life. To carry on your work has meant devotion and sacrifice. The effort has been abundantly worth while. You have stood for progress and the acceptance of all truth. You have always remembered that ‘the Lord hath more light and truth yet, to break forth out of His Holy Word.’ And your purpose, like the majestic strains of the glorious poet from whom you take your name, is to’ justify the ways of God to men.

To the younger people among you I would say, You have a great heritage, you are ina noble succession, and 1 it 1s your privilege to carry on the work that others have begun. A Church like yours is doing a great service. The Lord hath need of you. The world has need of you. The principles of Truth and Freedom cannot be kept alive in the world without men and women to embody them and fight for them. Do not be discouraged because the work is difficult. The work you are called to do has always been hard, and probably always will be hard, until the King- dom of God shall have come. Go forward with faith and hope in God and man, and make the future of Milton Church as great a power for the triumph of high principle as ever it has been in the past.” RussEL TRICKER,

(President, Huddersfield and District Congregational Council).

From Rev. J. B. Middlebrook, M.A. I HUuDDERSFIELD.

. ‘It is a very great privilege to offer warm and hearty congratulations to Milton Congregational Church upon the attainment of its Jubilee.

Fifty years of active effort and many ideal fellowships, shared by ministers and deacons, teachers, members and friends. Fifty years of witness and disciple- ship, of protest against the things opposed to the Kingdom and of service towards the fulfilment of God’s will. What a proud and happy record, with all that it suggests of the grace of Almighty God.

But always the callis “Speak unto the children of Israel that they go forward ’ a glorious past is a challenge to a greater future, a looking back with thankfulness is a prelude to a looking forward with hope. The God revealed in this immediate past is waiting to reveal Himself yet more abundantly in the days which lie ahead. The Huddersfield Free Churches assuredly believe that Milton Congrégational Church will at least be as influential in the future as in the past and they confidently look forward to a continuance of that ministry which has revealed to this town the nature and significance of spiritual principles, which has given to the Free Churches of Huddersfield loyal and devoted co-operation and which is demon- strating in signal fashion to this generation the faith and works of those who take Christ seriously.”

JoHn B. MipDLesrook,

(President, Huddersfield and District Free Church Council).

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CONGRATULATIONS — continued. From Rev. A. H Moncur Sime. PENZANCE, CORNWALL.

‘* Milton Church, trom its inception, under the pastoral care of the saintly John Turner Stannard, has stood for truth, and honour, and manhood ; and these are qualities that endure. { know something of the courage and toil and loving service which have been associated with the Church’s history, since that memorable day in 1881 when, finding itself tast bound in traditional trammels, it decided, in and by the grace of God, to become a Church whose ministry, whatever its defects, should be free ; and which should have (in Mr. Stannard’s words) ‘ as its keynote, its substance, its spirit—the living Christ, how to realise and follow Him.’ Enormous changes, in every direction, in thought and action, have taken place within the fifty years of the Church’s existence ; but underneath all of the changing fashions, we tind the same heartaches, the same failures, the same human needs. In this changing world, with its changing knowledge and its new statements of faith in terms of that changing knowledge, the clamant need still is that the Will of Jesus Christ should have its tree course in bringing about the Kingdom of God on earth. May Milton Church continue to stand for a Religion such as the Age, I believe, is heart-hungry for, a religion with God, with the Bible, with prayer, with worship, and with a future life, all taught and irradiated by the spiritual genius of Jesus Christ. Victory is certain, if in the future, as in the past, the Church is faithful to her great privileges.’ A. H. Moncur SIME.

From Rev. B. A. Millard. Bupe, CoRNWALL.

‘Founded fifty years ago, in that last quarter of the 19th century when a new spirit of enquiry began to manifest itself in the intellectual life of England, bringing with it a movement towards the enlargement of the spiritual and religious outlook, Milton Church stood as the embodiment of a sympathetic attitude towards whatever of new light and truth might break forth from the Word of God. The history of the past fifty years has abundantly justified the venture of faith of those who founded the Church. Freedom in the pulpit to proclaim its message, freedom in the pew to judge of the message, accepting such of it as 1s helpful to those who hear, with a Christian charity which never fails—such surely is the ideal spirit. So long as this continues to be the spirit of Milton, so long will it justify its place in the religious life of the Community. My best wishes for the continued well-being and service of the Church.” BenyN. A.

From Rev. J. W. G. Dew. West BROMWICH, STAFFS. Dear FRIENDS, One would need the memories of Charles Hirst, and the pen of a genius to do justice to such an event as the Jubilee of Milton Church. Failing these, it is still a great privilege to contribute a few thoughts to a Handbook which will go down to posterity as the record of a great achievement. I shall always count my ministry at Milton a red-letter period in my life, not because of anything I achieved, but for the privilege of standing in the line of the great tradition founded by John Turner Stannard and his co-workers, a tradition of enlightened thinking based deep in Christian experience. ‘That tradition, rooted in a glorious past, is still a living force, inspired by a living faith in Christ, and reaching out, as ever, into the light and life of the future. I shall always remember with joy and gratitude the loyal and devoted men and women who were my co-workers. Such a constant and unbroken succession of workers, filled with the Spirit of Christ, has kept Milton alive and strong for 50 years. May there ever be forth-coming young lives eager to keep the ranks filled, and to make still more glorious the next 50 years. With heartiest congratulations and best wishes, J. W. G. Dew.

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MILTON CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, HUDDERSFIELD

MINISTER AND DEACONS, JULY Ioth,”1929.

J. H. GranaM, H. S. Bricc, A. SINcLaIR, N. H. REvELL, J. W. SENror, E. GRAHAM, Mrs. T. SYKEs, C. Hirst, Miss E. GAUKRODGER, REv. H. Stock, Miss WoopHeap, E. WOODHEAD, F. HAIGH.

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HISTORICAL NOTES.

SHE following notes are gleaned from the Year Books and Minute Books, which have been carefully preserved. Although they do not profess to be a complete record of the past 49 years, the outstanding events have been included so as to present a connected story of the Church since its formation. The compilers have endeavoured to find a place for every event which was necessary to attain this end, but regret that lack of space has excluded many items which would have been of interest to the readers.

1881, FEBRUARY 7th.—The first event which our Jubilee celebrates is a meeting held on Monday, February 7th, 1881, when 226 persons affixed their names to a document expressing their intention of forming a new Church.

FEBRUARY 9TH.—This was followed by a meeting of those interested on Wednesday, February 9th, when a Resolution to establish forthwith the New Independent Church was carried with enthusiasm.

A committee was elected to give effect to the Resolution and met the same evening for the first time. Messrs. J. E. Willans and Ernest Woodhead were

appointed Secretaries to the Committee, and Messrs. Fred Eastwood and Geo. Maitland were appointed Treasurers.

FEBRUARY |1TH.—The Committee met the Trustees of the Victoria Hall, Buxton Road, Huddersfield, and it was agreed “* That the New Congrega- tional Church have the use of the whole of the premises on Sundays and such portions of the premises on Wednesdays as indicated in the Secretaries’ letter, on payment of £52 per quarter, to include lighting, cleaning and attendance.”

FEBRUARY 16TH.—The Committee decided to accept the offer of the ‘Temperance Society for the use of their harmonium at 15/- per quarter.

AprIL 10TH.—A Committee was appointed to draft a constitution of the New Church. ;

May 6TH.—The Committee presented the result of its work to a special meeting of the Congregation in Victoria Hall, and the Rules of the Constitution of the New Independent Church were adopted unanimously. On the previous evening a Church meeting had been held and 168 members enrolled.

May 18TH.—On Wednesday evening, May 18th, special meetings of the Church and Congregation (as provided by the Rules) were held for the purpose of electing the first Pastor. At each meeting the voting was by ballot and at each the choice fell unanimously upon the Rev. John Turner Stannard. He was then introduced to the meeting and received a very hearty welcome. In appropriate terms he accepted the office conferred upon him, thanked his

new flock for the honour done him and placed himself unreservedly at their disposal. I

May 22np.—The Sunday School (formed on April 3rd) with about 500 scholars held its Inaugural Services in the ‘* Armoury” which was filled to

its utmost capacity. The Rev. A. Holborn, M.A., of Bradford, preached morning and evening and the collection realised £166.

May 24TH.—Tea Meeting and Public Meeting held in Victoria Hall to celebrate the Inauguration of the New Church. The meeting attracted much public notice and the report occupied three columns in the local newspaper.

June Ist.—First Deacons were elected. Church Secretary, Mr. J. C. Moody. Church Treasurer, Mr. S. Arlom.

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NovEMBER 6TH.—Special meeting of Managing Committee held to receive a Report from a special Sub-Committee appointed to find a suitable site for a New

Chapel.

1882, JaNuaRY 25TH.—The First Annual Meeting of the Church and Con- gregation at which the Rev. J. T. Stannard presided. The Report stated that the Church had 247 members and the School 703 scholars and 83 Teachers.

Aprit 2Np.—The First Anniversary of the Sunday School held in the Town Hall. Sermons preached by the Rev. J. IT. Stannard.

June 28TH.—Meeting of the Church and Congregation, when it was decided to build New Church and Schools. Plans furnished by Messrs. Healey (Bradford). Building Committee elected. Estimated approximate cost of buildings was £10,000 and subscriptions amounting to £3,448 already promised.

NovemBeER 29TH.—Special Church Meeting. Resolved to call the New Church building “ Milton Church.”

1883, January 3lst.—Second Annual Meeting of the Church and Con- gregation, at which it was reported that promises to the Building Fund from 142 subscribers amounted to £5,360.

Marcu 26TH.—Easter Monday, the Foundation Stone of the New Sunday School, laid by the Superintendent, Mr. Chas Hirst, junr., procession through the streets headed by Meltham Mills Band. Tea for Scholars and Teachers at Queen Street School and for congregation at Victoria Hall. Large public meeting in the evening in the Armoury.’

Aucust 29TH.—Warm welcome given at the Church meeting to Rev. J. T. Stannard on his return home after more than 3 months absence to recruit

his health.

SEPTEMBER IsTt.—Corner Stone of the New Church laid by Wright Mellor, Esq., J.P., D.L. (Mayor of Huddersfield). Tea and Meeting in Victoria Hall, Speaker Rev. John Hunter (Hull).

1884, FeBpruary 6TH.—First performance of the operetta ‘“ Robin Hood ”’ by the Cricket Club and friends. Repeated on March I 1th, 12th, 25th, 27th, April 14th and 16th; realised £110 towards the Church Building Fund.

June Ist.—Whit-Sunday. Prayer Meeting held in the New School at 8 a.m., by the Teachers. Ordinary Services conducted by the Pastor for the first time in the new Assembly Hall.

JuNE 5TH (Thursday).—Formal Opening of the New School. Sermons preached in the afternoon and evening by Rev. J. Morlais Jones (London), Rev. W. Elstub (Wakefield) and Rev. E. A. Lawrence (Halifax). Tea was served in the

Lecture Room.

JUNE 8TH (Sunday).—Continuation of opening services, when sermons were preached by Rev. Dr. Fairbairn, of Airedale College, Ex-Chairman of the Congregational Union of England and Wales. ©

June 10TH.—Conversazione given by Officers and Teachers of the Schools, in the new Assembly Hall, to Representatives of 47 Sunday Schools from the town and district, irrespective of denomination. With hosts inclusive there were 800 present. Rev. J. T. Stannard presided and addresses were given by Messrs. D. Kirk (Hillhouse), R. Riley (Buxton Road), B. Gledhill (Laisterdyke), F. Crosland (Highfield) and C. Hirst. Worship, music, instrumental and vocal, social converse and refreshments admirably served, were other features of a novel and successful gathering.

Ocroser 28TH.—First Bazaar. Proceeds for the Building Fund, held in the new Church and opened by E. Crossley, Esq., J.P., Mayor-elect of Halifax. This was continued till Saturday, November Ist, and realised, after all expenses were paid, the gratifying sum of £1,277 l6s. IId.

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DercEMBER |0TH.—A Social Gathering held in the Assembly Hall and conducted largely after the fashion of the previous conversazione, to serve as a means of welcoming new-comers and of uniting the congregation in closer bonds of Christian friendship and service. It was largely attended and greatly enjoyed.

1885, JANUARY 21st.—Fourth Annual Meeting of the Church and Congre- gation, at which it was decided to take four special collections during the year in order to meet the charge for interest on the loan of £6,000 obtained from the Building Society. At 4°% this necessitated raising £60 four times per year.

JANUARY 26TH.—Meeting of the Managing Committee received and accepted with deepest regret the resignation of Mr. George Maitland, one of the Treasurers since the formation of the Church. The Committee recorded its grateful appreciation of the valuable service he had rendered. Mr. Ernest Woodhead resigned position as Joint Secretary. The meeting elected Mr. J. E. Willans Secre- tary and Messrs. F. Eastwood and Joel Arlom ‘Treasurers.

June 18TH.—The New Church opened for public worship. The Rev. Dr. Hannay, Secretary to the Congregational Union of England and Wales, preached in the afternoon and evening, and the devotional services were conducted

by the Pastor and the Rev. E. Armitage, M.A., of Rotherham.

JUNE 21stT.—Continuation of Opening Services. Preacher for the day, the Rev. Dr. Simon, Principal of the Theological Hall, Edinburgh. In the after-

noon the scholars assembled in the Church and suitable addresses were given by

Messrs J. C. Moody and E. Woodhead.

JuNE 23RD.—Formal opening of the New Organ by an Organ Recital and Service of Praise, most efficiently and enjoyably rendered by the Choir, assisted by numerous friends. Mr. Pearson, of Brighouse, presided at the organ and the

Misses. H. and M. Tomlinson (Leeds) and Messrs. H. Ackroyde and W. Bartin (Huddersfield) were the principal vocalists.

JuNE 25TH.—Continuation of Opening Services. Evening Service— Preacher, the Rev. Marmaduke Miller, of Manchester.

JuNE 28TH.—F urther Opening Services. Morning—Preacher, the Rev. Dr. John Pulsford, of Edinburgh ; Evening—Preacher, the Pastor.

Juty 2Np.—Concluding Opening Service. Preacher, the Rev. John Hunter, of Hull.

JuLty Communion Service in the New Church.

(The furnishing and opening of the New Church were the chief events of 1885. The Church and School premises, with organ and furnishings, were estimated to have cost about £14,000. The organ by J. Conacher & Sons cost £600, towards which the Choir made a handsome contribution. The work of the Building Committee, an account of which would fill a volume, was strenuous and devoted. They had many problems to settle and many difficulties to face before the buildings were erected, and the vital question of cost was ever present. That they had the courage to plan and erect such spacious and well-equipped premises is evidence of the faith which upheld them and the confidence they had as to the future. Viewing their work from a distance of 45 years we cannot help expressing a great admiration and respect for this group of men who planned so well and wisely).

DECEMBER 6TH.—Death of Ald. John Eccles by which the Church lost

° . ’ one of its warmest friends and most generous supporters.’

DEcEMBER 30TH.—A Resolution from the Managing Committee was sent to the Church and Congregation of George Street Chapel thanking them for their great kindness in allowing the use of their premises for weddings during the previous 5 years.

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1886, January 24rH.—Meeting of the Managing Committee at which Mr. Willans resigned his position as Secretary, which he had held since the Church was formed. He had been a tower of strength throughout the period, a wonderful asset to the Committee during the planning and building of the Church and negotiations with Sir John Wm. Ramsden respecting the ground. Mr Thos. Metcalf was elected Secretary.

Marcu 28TH.—Mr. T. L. Gledhill resigned his position as Church organist after over 5 years faithful service. A gift of music books was made to him as a token of esteem and appreciation of his services. Mr. Ben Sykes was appointed Organist in his place.

Aprit 4TH.—The Committee gratefully accepted an offer from Mr. Willans to hang the Church Chancel walls with Tapestry Curtains.

|stT.—Meeting of the Church and Congregation which decided on an extension of the Liturgical part of the Church Service.

DeEcEMBER |1TH.—Inaugural Meeting in Mr. J. C. Moody’s new class room. The cost of the alterations had been borne by Mr. Moody and his class members. (This room is now known as the © Room).

. DECEMBER 29TH.—It was decided that the Church Anniversary should in future be held in June, to commemorate the opening of the new Church build- ings. 1887, Fesruary 2NpD.—The Committee accepted the resignation of Mr. Fred Eastwood as Treasurer with great regret and appointed Mr. Geo. Maitland in his place. FEBRUARY 9TH.—Meeting of the Church and Congregation decided

by large majorities to adopt the “Commandments ’”’ and “ Beatitudes ’’ as part of the service.

Marcu 30TH.—Joint Meeting of Deacons, Managing Committee and Building Committee decided that a fitting way of celebrating Queen Jubilee Year would be to make an effort to reduce the debt on the Church Premises. The members of the Committees promised individual subscriptions amounting to £1,055 towards the £2,000 aimed at. June 20TH.—Queen Victoria’s Jubilee was celebrated by public re- joicings in the town and the scholars of the Sunday School joined in the demonstra- tion in large numbers and afterwards had tea in the Schoolroom.

June 22np.—A Tea and Treat given to poor children in the School to mark the Queen’s Jubilee.

Ocroser 17TH, 18TH AND 19TH.—Evangelistic Services conducted by the Rev. W. T. Moreton, of Earlsheaton.

Ocroser 20TH, 21st, 22ND, 23RD.—Services continued and conducted by Rev. Matthew Stanley, of Laisterdyke.

1888, January 15TH, 16TH AND 18TH.—Evangelistic Services in the Church, conducted by the Rev. Matthew Stanley.

ApRIL 3RD.—Sale of Work opened by Mrs. Jos. Woodhead, in aid of the Cricket and Lawn Tennis Clubs.

May 15TH.—Inaugural meeting of the Christian Guild for Young People.

OcrosBeR 24TH.—Annual Meeting of the Huddersfield and Heckmond- wike District of the Yorkshire Congregational Union, held in the Church.

Ocroser 24TH.—Autumnal Meetings of the Yorkshire Home Missionary Society were held at Milton Church, the Rev. J. T. Stannard being President for the year. Mr. Stannard was also chosen to prepare and present an address of welcome to the Baptist Union during its visit to Huddersfield the same month, and won marked commendation for the work.

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NovEMBER 5TH TO |1TH.—Evangelistic Services conducted in Church > and School by Rev. Dr. Macfadyen, of Manchester.

1889, JaNUARY 23RD.—The Annual Meeting was held during Mr. Stannard’s absence at Hexham-on-Iyne, where he had gone in the hope of recruiting his

health. Mr. Chas Hirst presided.

Marcu 28TH.—Death of Stephen Arlom, aged 82 years, the senior Deacon, whose name will ever be associated with the formation and early history of the

Church.

SEPTEMBER |1TH.—Joint Meeting of Deacons and Managing Committee. Mr. Stannard’s illness and consequent absence from home formed the subject of a lengthy and sympathetic conversation. It was decided to send him a message agreeing to the holiday advised by his medical attendant and to supply the pulpit during his absence.

SEPTEMBER |2TH.—The Congregation and the inhabitants of the town were shocked to receive the news of Mr. Stannard’s death at Blackpool under tragic circumstances. Not only the Church, but all Huddersfield and all Non- conformist England mourned his death. ‘The Report adds, It 1s ours to record our very high appreciation of the beauty of the Christ- like spirit manifested under trying circumstances during the earlier years of his ministry, which so greatly endeared him to us all, inspired us to share with him in self-sacrifice and devotion to the service of the Christ whom he so much loved. It is ours to cherish the fragrant memory of his ministry 1n later years, and esteem it as a precious and abiding heritage.’

SEPTEMBER 16TH.—Funeral Service and interment of Mr. Stannard, largely attended by members of the congregation and the public.

SEPTEMBER 29TH.—Memorial Service of the late Rev. J. T. Stannard in the Church, conducted by his great personal friend, Rev. John Hunter, of Hull. A memorable service which revealed the great esteem in which he was regarded.

NovVEMBER DTH TO 9TH.—A Bazaar, postponed from October Ist, on account of Mr. Stannard’s death, was held in the Town Hall, and realised over £1,900 towards the reduction of the debt on premises. The Choir’s share of this amount was over £300. (£2,000 was repaid to the Building Society).

1890, FeBruARY 5TH.—An account of a Sunday evening Service appeared in the Nonconformist Musical Journal and drew attention to the beauty of the musical part of the service under the leadership of Mr. Ramsay Bower, with Mr. Ben Sykes at the organ. It was held up as a shining example of refined and sym- pathetic devotional effort.

FEBRUARY |9TH.—The Building Committee formally transferred their functions to the Managing Committee, thus vesting the entire control of the premises in one body.

May 28ru.—A Special Church Meeting nominated Rev. A. C. Tur- berville, of St. Ives (Hunts.) to the Pastorate of Milton Church.

June 4rH—A Meeting of the Church and congregation elected Mr. Turberville to the Pastorate.

Juty 15ta—Mr. Turberville accepted the “ call ’’ and commenced his ministry on October 5th.

SEPTEMBER |2TH.—An anonymous © Worshipper’’ presented to the Church the Organ Screen and Communion Table in memory of the late Mr. Stan- nard. The inscription on the screen is as follows : “ In grateful and affectionate memory of the Rev. John Turner Stannard, first Pastor of Milton Church, Hud- dersfield. This screen is dedicated by a Friend to whom he unveiled the greatness of the Father’s love and the exceeding beauty of the Christ life. Sept. 12th, 1890.”

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OcToBER 5TH.—Recognition Service on the settlement of Mr. Turber- ville; Preacher, Rev. Prof. A. B. Bruce, D.D., of Glasgow.

OcToBEeR 6TH.—Public Meeting and Tea. A very large attendance included many ministers of the town and district.

DECEMBER |sT.—* The Musical Herald’’ published a long and com- plimentary account of the activities of the choir and recorded a high level of musical talent which was evident to those who were fortunate enough to be able to attend the Sunday Services and the various concerts held from time to time at Milton.

1891, JaNuaRY 21st.—Annual Meeting at which 21 Trustees were nominated and Committee appointed to consider a draft Trust Deed.

May.—Mr. Geo. P. Stather elected Church Secretary by the Deacons and Church meeting.

June 17TH.—The Committeee accepted the resignation of Mr. Maitland as Treasurer with very deep regret but with very hearty thanks for past services as Treasurer and in other capacities.

NovEMBER |st.—The P.S.A. held its first meeting with an attendance of over 300 men. ‘The initial work and expense were undertaken by the senor men’s class of the School. The Society was the first of its kind in the town.

DrEcEMBER.—Memorial volume to the late Rev. J. T. Stannard, edited by Rev. John Hunter, of Glasgow, was published and found a ready sale both from members of the Church and other friends.

1892, FEBRUARY 3RD.—Annual Meeting at which the following were finally elected as Trustees, viz., Joel Arlom, Ramsay Bower, A. F. Bateman, J. J. Brook, Jno. Conacher, Fredk. Eastwood, Jimmy Firth, Charles Hirst, W. E. Johnston, Thos. Kettlewell, David Kirk, Thos. Metcalf, J. C. Moody, G. P. Stather, Joe Sykes, Jas. Walker Sykes, Walter Turner, James Edward Willans, Edgar. T. Woodhead, Ernest Woodhead, Joseph Woodhead.

June 10TH.—The Committee received and accepted with great regret the resignation of Mr. Ben Sykes, Organist, who had obtained an appointment at Trinity Church, Glasgow. Juty J. W. Pearce appointed Organist. Further reports for 1892 deplore the deaths of Mr. Walter Turner, a Deacon and Vice-Superintendent of the School, and Mrs. Alfred Kilner, a friend of the poor and a diligent worker for the Church. 1893, FEBRUARY 23RD.—Mr. Joel Arlom was cordially thanked for his services as Ireasurer for the past 7 years and regret expressed that he had resigned the position. Mr. A. F. Bateman was elected Treasurer.

Marcu 14TH to 18tH.—Bazaar in the Town Hall during very wintry weather raised £1,213.

During the year the Church was cleaned and redecorated inside and outside and electric light installed . Cost over £200. The year closed in an atmosphere of gloom with the death of Mr. Thos. Kettlewell and Mr. Ramsay Bower, the Choirmaster. Mr. death at an early age was a great loss not only to the Church and Sunday School but to the musical life of the town.

1894, Fepruary Ist.—Mr. D. W. Evans appointed Choirmaster.

FEBRUARY I4TH AND 15TH.—Sale of Work inthe Assembly Hall realised £150. Marcu.—The Band of Hope held an Industrial Exhibition, with competitions, etc., which excited much interest. £50 profit was made. 1895, Fesruary 13TH.—Rev. A. C. Turburville resigned his position as Pastor and accepted a “‘call”” to Cheltenham.

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Aucust.—Death of Mr. Hirst Green, a great worker in Choir, P.S.A., Band of Hope, and Cricket Club. NoveMBER 7TH.—Resignation of Mr. D. W. Evans as Choirmaster. NovemBer Seth Senior appointed Choirmaster. 1896, FesruaRY 26TH.—It was unanimously resolved to invite the Rev. J. S. Drummond, of Wolverhampton, to the Pastorate of the Church. Marcu acceptance of the call was announced. June 17tTH.—An “ At Home”’ was held to welcome Mr. Drummond. June 19TH.—Death of Mr. Thos. Metcalf, the Secretary of the Mana- ging Committee for over 10 years, “an indefatigable worker, a Deacon, Vice-

President and Secretary of the P.S.A., a devoted helper of any movement which aimed at the uplifting of his fellowmen. ”

Juty 16rTH.—Mr. A. L. Woodhead appointed Secretary of the Managing Committee.

SEPTEMBER 20TH.—Meeting of the congregation after evening service passed a resolution “ of horror and indignation at the continuous massacre of Armenian Christians in the Turkish Empire.”’

DECEMBER.—Death of Alderman J. J. Brook, one of the founders and a very generous helper of the Church. P.S.A. reports that 1,043 prizes have been distributed during the year. 1897, Marcu 17TH.—Adoption of Dr. Barrett's Congregational Hymnal by the congregation. I OcToBER 19TH To 23RD.—Bazaar in Town Hall which raised over £1,500, and resulted in £1,500 being re-paid to the Building Society.

This year’s Report deplores the death of Mrs. Charles Hirst, “* one of the best

and most effective, if most unobtrusive workers. She was greatly loved and esteemed. ”

1898.—A year which records devoted and steady work in all departments with increased Church membership. Sale of Work raised £162.

Regret is expressed at the death of Mrs. J. E. Willans.

1899, Fepruary 10TH.—Mr. Seth Senior resigned his position as Choirmaster, and it was accepted with regret and sincere thanks for past services.

ApriL 6TH.—Mr. John Bowling appointed Choirmaster.

OctToBER.—Death of Mr. Alexander F. Bateman, the Treasurer, “* an enthusiastic and faithful officer and a kind friend to all who knew him. A wise steward of the treasuries of the Church, a devout, zealous and sympathetic helper in all its enterprises.”

NovemBer.—Mr. A. L. Woodhead resigned the Secretaryship of the Committee.

1900, JaNnuary.—Mr. Edgar Woodcock appointed Secretary. FepruaRY.— Mr. J. E. Moody appointed Treasurer.

SEPTEMBER.—New heating apparatus fixed in the Church. The Milton

‘ Guild” was formed with 130 members. The “ Star ’’ Card system adopted in the School.

DECEMBER, 31sT.—The end of the 19th Century. An impressive “ Watch Night ’’ Service was held.

1901, Aprit.—Mr. John Bowling resigned his appointment as Choirmaster and later Mr. J. W. Pearce was appointed Joint Organist and Choirmaster.

‘* Reduction of Debt” Fund privately subscribed amounted during the year to £840. A Sale of Work realised £322.

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NoveMBER 26TH.—Mr. Drummond announced that he had received and accepted a © from Masboro’ Church, Rotherham. He preached farewell sermons on December 29th and the following evening a meeting was held to bid him “‘ God Speed ”’ and an illuminated address and a purse of £60 were presented to him. His pastorate lasted 53 years. The large attendance at the meeting included most of the ministers of the town and district.

1902, JuNE 15tTH.—Church Anniversary Services, when the Rev. A. H. Moncur Sime, of Chelsea, preached. He made such an impression on his hearers that on July 2nd at a special meeting he was unanimously “ called”’ to the Pastorate. The “ call” was accepted and Mr. Sime commenced his ministry on September

14th.

SEPTEMBER 24TH.—Reception given by the Mayor and Mayoress (Ald. and Mrs. Ernest Woodhead) to welcome Mr. and Mrs. Sime. About 400 guests

were introduced to the new Pastor and his wife.

OctToBER Coming of Age”’ services held in the Church. This year’s report refers to the death of Mr. Joel Arlom, one of the founders, one time Treasurer, Sunday School Teacher and Superintendent. He also capably filled many offices connected with Church and School.”’

1903—Towards the end of the year, Mr. Sime had a severe illness and for several weeks was unable to fulfil his ministerial duties. He received much sympathy during this time.

Teachers’ Bible Class was formed in the School under the Presidency of Mr. Edgar T. Woodhead.

1904.—The year was memorable for a successful Bazaar held in the Town Hall in March which realised £1,283, and thus enabled the Committee to pay off the balance of debt on the buildings. The Choir raised the cost of re-decorating the Choir Vestry. The Married Ladies’ Concert raised £30, which was expended on a complete set of crockery for Church use.

Mr. W. H. Woodcock, one of the founders died during the year. 1905.—The Sunday School held a Sale of Work in the Spring and the proceeds

were devoted to completely re-decorate the Assembly Hall and classrooms and install the electric light, with a very pleasing result. New system of teaching introduced in the Primary Dept. of the School. Structural alterations needed for this purpose in the Primary Room were carried out.

In July Mr. Edgar Woodcock resigned the position of Secretary to the Com-

mittee, who thanked him heartily for his past services and appointed Mr. Geo. H. Crossley as Secretary.

Institution of Choir Committee for the purpose of control and management of its affairs.

1906.—Introduction of Individual Communion Cups at the January Service.

The “ grading” system was further introduced in the School, which was divided into Senior and Junior Departments.

The death took April of Ald. Jimmy Firth, a long and faithful supporter of the Church and a member of the Managing Committee. In September, Mr. G. P. Stather left the Church to reside in the South of England. His work as a Deacon, Church Secretary, member of the Committee, Young Men’s Class Teacher, had been most valuable and his loss was greatly felt. Mr. W. E. Johnston was elected Church Secretary. The 25th Anniversary of the Church was held on February 26th and 27thand “‘ the services were characterised by a spirit of enthusiasm which was very refreshing.”

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1907.—An “ Institute ’’ was formed in connection with the senior department of the School. In the Summer, rambles were arranged and in the Winter, socials, educational and literary and devotional meetings were held. Good attendances reported. An ‘‘ Old English ’’ Bazaar held in the Schoolroom realised £550. A Married Ladies’ Tea and Entertainment raised £20.

Mrs. J. C. Moody, a devoted worker, died during the year.

1907.—* Children’s ” Services instituted as part of the regular Sunday morning service. (During this year, the Huddersfield and District Congregational Council was formed out of the ‘“ Ministers’ and Deacons’ Association ’’).

1908, January 29TH.—At the Annual Meeting it was Resolved that ** Collec- tions be taken at all Sunday morning services.” Up to this time Sunday morning collections had been taken on special occasions only.

A Special Fund raised by subscription realised £155. Considerable repairs to the property were carried out this year at a cost of over £200. The Church Chancel was decorated. In December, the Tercentenary of the birth of John Milton was celebrated by an interesting lecture on the life and works of the Poet by Mr. Ernest Woodhead. The Choir gave musical settings of some of Milton’s poems.

On December 30th, a memorable gathering was held to celebrate the 50 years Sunday School work of the Superintendent, Mr. Chas. Hirst. Presentations were made to him which had been subscribed for by a large number of past and present Teachers, Scholars and Friends.

1909.—A noteworthy event this year was the successful “‘ Norwegian ”’

Bazaar in the Town Hall. Proceeds £888.

Improved arrangement of lighting in the Church was carried out after prolonged experiment.

The Yorkshire Congregational Union held its Annual Meetings in Hudders- field in April, when some of the meetings were held in Milton School Room.

1910.—Formation of a‘ Women’s Guild of Christian Service ’’ with 60 mem- bers.

Celebration of 60 years of Sunday School Work by Mr. John Catton Moody, on October 22nd. Past and present scholars and friends joined in a tea and meeting when appropriate presentations were made to him.

Death of Mr. Harry Thorpe, a young but valued member of School, Church, Choir, Band of Hope, etc., is mentioned with deep regret.

191 1.—The Secretary (Mr. G. H. Crossley), the Treasurer (Mr. J. E. Moody) and the Subscription Treasurer (Mr. H. A. L. Moody) all resigned the office they held on the Managing Committee. The resignations were accepted and hearty thanks accorded them all for their valuable services to the Church. The Committee elected Mr. Crossley to be Treasurer, Mr. Frank Revell to be Subscription Treasurer and Mr. Norman Revell to be Secretary. The Committee instituted a different method of acknowledging subscriptions, which gave great satisfaction.

The first Annual Sale of Work was held in April. Supplementary hymns and vespers were added to the hymn books used in the Church.

Deaths of Mr. J. C. Moody (October) and Mr. Frederick Eastwood (Dec- ember) ; both founders of the Church and devoted workers and generous helpers in everything concerning the welfare of Milton Church. A brass tablet commemor- ating Mr. Moody’s services was placed in his class-room (now the * Milton’’ Room).

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1912.—A Church meeting in May decided that ““ women members of the Churcn shall be eligible to hold the office of Deacon”’ and elected Mrs. David Johnston, Ben Wood and Miss Gaukrodger to the office. The number of Deacons elected stood at twelve, for the first time for many years. [he Church suitably celebrated the 25Uth anniversary of the Great Ejectment of 1662.

A new hot water boiler was fixed in the Church in November.

1913.—Tne death (which occurred in May) of Mr. Joseph Woodhead, one of the founders ot tne Church and one of its staunchest supporters, ended a career of public service which made |Vlilton Church proud to number him as one of the Congregation. Ihe varied character of the largely-attended funeral service was eloquent testimony of the high esteem with which he was regarded by his fellow townsmen.

1913.—In May, Mr. Sime received and accepted a very hearty and unanimous call to the Swan Hull Congregational Church, Shrewsbury. A meeting of the Church and congregation passed a resolution regretting Mr. Sime’s acceptance of the call and tendering hearty thanks for his services during a pastorate of eleven years. On August Z/th a farewell meeting was held and a large gathering gave Mr. and Mrs. Sime their hearty good wishes for the future. Presentations to the value of £40 were made to them.

1914.—The congregation decided at the Annual Meeting to inaugurate a Repairs and Renewals Reserve Fund ”’ which should be built up by transferring a fixed amount annually trom the Revenue Account and which would suffice to keep the premises in a good state of repair without having recourse to large Bazaars, which were almost impossible in view of the adoption of the Annual Sale of Work (1 he wisdom of tnis decision has been fully justified during the years which have elapsed and year by year the cost of renovating the premises and renewing the fittings has been met trom this fund).

JaNuaRY Meeting of the Huddersfield and District Congregational Council elected Mr. Edgar ‘I’. Woodhead president for the year.

In May Mr. J. W. Pearce resigned the office of organist and choirmaster to take up a similar position at the Congregational Church, St. Annes-on-Sea. His 22 years service at Milton are worthy of special note and the choir members and his many friends in the Church testified of their appreciation of his services by presenting him with a solid silver Tea Service and Vase.

Mr. Harry Armitage was appointed to fill the vacant dual position.

A new glass-roofed corridor connecting the Church with the School was con- structed and added greatly to the convenience and privacy of the Primary Room.

When the war broke out, the Deacons and Selection Committee called the Church and congregation to a special meeting on Aug. 24th, and on account of the great uncertainty which prevailed recommended the appointment of a Pastor-in- charge. This was readily agreed to and the Church was fortunate in finding in the Rev. B. A. of Walsall, a capable Minister who was able and willing to accept the responsibility. Mr. Millard commenced his ministry on the first Sunday in October and for four years while the war raged and our minds were perplexed he earnestly devoted himself to keeping alive the best traditions and

aspirations of our Church. In his work he was most ably and nobly assisted by Mrs. Millard.

Early in the year, Mr. Edward Walker, the Caretaker, resigned his position after seventeen years service. Mr. James Sutcliffe was selected from a large number of applicants for the position.

‘Towards the end of the year the Assembly Hall was requisitioned by the War Department for the use of the “ Territorials ’’ as sleeping quarters. The Lecture Room was handed over to them as a recreation room and various efforts for their comfort and entertainment were carried out by a voluntary committee.

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1915.—During the year an interesting event was the holding in our premises of a United Bazaar, organised by the Huddersfield and District Congregational Council. The Rev. J. A. Booth (Ramsden Street) and Mr. Norman Revell were Joint Secretaries. [he Bazaar was a great success and over £1,200 was raised for local Congregationalism.

1916.—A Joint Meeting of the Deacons and Committee held in February arranged for the evening services to commence at 5-30 and end at 6-30, owing to the darkened condition of the streets. During the year the Church lost by death the help of some of its warmest supporters and oldest members in the persons

of Mrs. Joseph Woodhead, Mr. William Wood and Mr. David Kirk.

1916.—Mr. Millard was appointed Secretary of the local Congregational Council.

1917.—Mr. Norman Revell asked to be relieved of the Secretaryship of the Managing Committee owing to ill-health and Mr. Edgar T. Woodhead kindly

consented to occupy the position of Temporary Secretary.

At the Annual meeting in January the following were elected as Trustees to bring the number up to 21, viz.: Messrs. H. Armitage, H. S. Brigg, H. Crosland, G.H. Crossley, E. Graham, A. Hirst, E. Jones, T. D. Oldfield, F. E. Revell, N. H. Revell, M. W. Riding, J. W. Senior, J. H. Stafford, L. M. Sykes, A. E. Whiteley and A. L. Woodhead. Note.—The surviving original Trustees were: Messrs. aL W.E. Johnston, Jas. Ed. Willans, Edgar T. Woodhead and Ernest Woodhead.

The state of the organ had occasioned the Committee considerable concern for some time and it was ultimately decided to have it rebuilt and fitted with the most modern “ tubular pneumatic action” by Messrs. P. Conacher & Co. Ltd. The cost was about £350 and was entirely met by private subscriptions. It was

re-opened in July by Mr. Haydn Sandwell, A.R.C.O., and the late organist, Mr. J. W. Pearce, F.R.C.O.

Another important event was the occupation of the whole of the School premises as a War Hospital from June onwards. The only rooms available for all our work were the Church and the Minister’s and the Choir Vestries. The Sunday School found Sunday accommodation in the Technical College and the Band of Hope had a room kindly placed at their disposal by the Trustees of Buxton Road Chapel. The social work of the Church was thus greatly hampered and curtailed, but Milton friends endeavoured as far as possible to brighten the lives of the wounded soldiers in residence by the provision of a canteen open every evening, and a weekly concert and a light supper and service on Sunday evenings.

We learnt with deep regret of the deaths of Gunner Norman France and Lance- Corporal Arthur Wood, both ardent workers in Sunday School and Choir and young men of great promise.

In July Mr. Frank Revell, the Subscription Treasurer, had to relinquish his duties temporarily owing to being engaged in Government duties and Mr. Crossley, the Treasurer, undertook to carry out his work.

September.—Legacy of £50 received from the late Miss Watkinson.

1918, March.—Death of Mr. W. E. Johnston, Church Secretary, after many years devoted service for the Church and Sunday School. “* He was a true Christian whose delight it was to forget himself in service to others.” Mr. Edgar Jones appointed by the Deacons to the position of Church Secretary.

Deaths also recorded during the year of Mr. G. P. Stather, a former Church Secretary, Mr. J. E. Moody, a one-time Treasurer, and Mr. Alfred North, Deacon’s Treasurer.

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In August, the Rev. B. A. Millard terminated his 4 years’ ministry ; years of unremitting care, thought and energy in the work of the Church. On August 28th a meeting of the Church and Congregation was held to bid “ farewell ”’ to Mr. and Mrs. Millard and suitable presentations were made to them.

In October, Mr. Edgar T. Woodhead announced his resignation from the office of Secretary to the Committee and Mr. Norman H. Revell was re-appointed to the position. Mr. Woodhead was heartily thanked for his services. The work of negotiating with the War Department respecting the occupation of our premises as a Military Hospital was a particularly onerous task and most ably handled by him.

Monday, November |1th.—Armistice announced. A Service of thanks- giving was held on Wednesday evening and was largely attended. The reaction after the first demonstrations of joy brought the congregation together by common consent and a memorable and impressive service was he

1919, February.—Evacuation of premises by the Military Authorities. A very busy time ensued whilst the premises were re-decorated and renovated. As a Memorial to those of our number who had lost their lives in the war and as a Thank-offering for the restoration of Peace,’ a Fund was opened and an appeal made for £400. So heartily was this supported that £487 was subscribed and the money spent on alteration of premises and the provision of a fully-equipped Billiard and Recreation Room known as the Men’s Institute ’’ (opened November 29th).

of three“ At Homes ”’ to celebrate our re-occupation of School premises took place on May 14th, 15th and 17th. They were largely attended and raised £43. Immediately following this event the Church and congregation sent a hearty and unanimous call to the Rev. J. W. G. Dew, of Narborough, near Leicester, to the Pastorate. The call was accepted and Mr. Dew commenced his ministry on July 9th. The Recognition Service was held on September 17th.

The Choir, by private subscription, erected two memorial brasses Chancel for their colleagues Norman France and Arthur Wood, who fell in the War.

November.—School Room was used for entertainments by the promotors

of the “ World’s Service Exhibition,” held in the Drill Hall. During the year Mr. Charles Hirst completed 60 years of Sunday School work.

1920, JuNne.—Purchase of a house in Trinity Street as a Manse for the use of the Pastor, who was married on August 30th. At a Congregational meeting held on September 22nd, our felicitations were offered to Mr. Dew and wedding presents

were given to him from the Church, the School, and the P.S.A.

During the year, the Church, at a cost of £70, adopted the New Congregational Hymnary. Mr. Dew appointed Secretary of the local auxiliary of the L.M.S. The Church contributed £150 to the Yorkshire Congregational Union Ministers’ Stipend Fund.

1921.—A notable event this year was the resignation of Mr. Charles Hirst as a Sunday School worker after a fine record of sixty-two years service at Ramsden Street Church and Milton Church. He held the offices of Superintendent and Vice- Super. of Milton School since its formation. The teachers and Scholars marked the occasion of his retirement by a presentation made to him at a social meeting held on December 3rd.

1922.—In January the Church records with deep regret the sudden death of Mr. Edgar Woodhead. There were few offices in the Church and School which Mr. Woodhead had not held with distinction and every part of the Church suffered by his death. Those who were privileged to attend his class in the School will never forget his exposition of the Scriptures, while his work on the Diaconate and the Managing Committee was marked by a depth of wisdom and judgment which was an invaluable asset to the Church.

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1922, SEPTEMBER |4th.—The Committee sent a message of congratulation to Mr. J. E. Willans on the attainment of his 80th birthday. Towards the end of the year, Mr. G. H. Crossley, the Treasurer to the Committee had a serious breakdown in health which resulted in his resignation of the position. The Committee accepted the resignation with regret and placed on record their high appreciation of his services as Secretary and Treasurer over a period of 19 years.

Mr. Frank Revell was appointed Treasurer in his place.

Legacy of £100 received from the exors. of the late Miss Annie Rayner.

Mr. Edgar Jones resigned his office of Church Secretary and Mr. Sydney Shaw was elected to fill the vacancy.

1923, May 8tH.—The Committee congratulated Mr. Chas. Hirst on his 80th

birthday and his wonderful record of service.

Rev. J. W. G. Dew appointed President of the Huddersfield and District

Congregational Council.

1924, Aprit.—Death of Mr. G. H. Crossley, a former Secretary and Treasurer of the Managing Committee and a staunch worker for 20 years.

SEPTEMBER.— [he lease of the “ Manse ’’ was converted from 99 years to 999 years.

The contributions to the Congregational Union “ Forward Fund amounted to £160.

1925.—Death of Mrs. David Johnston at the venerable age of 94 years. Her memory will long be cherished for her kindness and generous support of the

Church.

An interesting event took place in October, when a service was held in Ramsden Street Church in which both congregations united in celebrating the centenary of the parent Church. The Service was conducted by Mr. Dew, the Minister

of Milton Church, and the sermon preached by Dr. Sidney M. Berry, the Secre- tary of the Congregational Union of England and Wales.

1926, May 10TH.—Death of Mr. James Edward Willans, aged 83. One of the Founders of the Church and the first Secretary of the Managing Committee, of which he had been a member since its formation. His work for the Church during its 45 years existence had been invaluable and his services to his native town, particularly in the cause of education, left an imperishable memory behind him. He was a ‘ Freeman of the Borough and one of Huddersfield’s most illustrious sons.

During the year, at the invitation of the Deacons of Ramsden Street Church, eight members of our Church were appointed to meet a similar number of that Church to explore the possibilities of union of the two Churches. Numerous meetings were held, and towards the end of the year the Committee appointed an Advisory Committee consisting of well-known ministers and laymen in our denomination and laid their proposals before them. The Advisory Committee unanimously recommended a line of action which did not commend itself to the friends at Ramsden Street and the scheme was not proceeded with.

Mr. Charles Hirst was elected to the Presidency of the Huddersfield and District Congregational Council, a fitting tribute to a lifetime’s work inthe cause of Congregationalism.

The Children’s Choir, conducted by Mr. Harry Armitage, won the “ Cup ” in the local Congregational Musical Competition.

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1927, FEBRUARY.—A meeting of the Church and congregation unanimously decided to adopt the system of free-will offerings known as the‘ Envelope

May.—Mr. Herbert S. Brigg elected to the Diaconate and appointed to the position of Church Secretary.

The Junior Department of the School was reorganised and new equipment purchased out of the proceeds of a successful “ Birthday Party ’’ given by Miss Calvert to celebrate the completion of 2] years service as Superintendent of this department.

SEPTEMBER.—Mr. Dew announced the receipt and acceptance of a hearty and unanimous call to the Pastorate of Mayers Green Congregational Church, West Bromwich. A farewell meeting was held on October 31st, when a substantial cheque and personal gifts were presented to Mr. and Mrs. Dew, and every Society in the Church voiced its regret at their departure and expressed best wishes for their future. So terminated a happy and successful ministry extending over 83 years.

A Selection Committee was appointed to take steps to fill the vacant Pastorate.

1928.—During the year considerable repairs were carried out, notably to the tower of the Church. The three stone pinnacles at the corners were found to be unsafe and removed. _A new boiler was fixed to the School Heating Apparatus.

FEBRUARY.— [he Church lost a loyal friend and supporter by the death of Mr. Frank Calvert.

Juty 25TH.—A meeting of the Church and congregation unanimously decided to invite the Rev. Herbert Stock, of Derby Street Church, Bolton, to the Pastorate of Milton Church.

Messrs. Herbert Brigg, Norman Revell, and Ernest Woodhead conveyed the “ call’ to Mr. Stock within a few days of this meeting.

After meeting the Deacons and Managing Committee, Mr. Stock, on Sep- tember 15th, intimated his acceptance of the call to the Pastorate and commenced his ministry on October 14th, when large congregations assembled at three services in the Church. An official welcome was offered to Mr. and Mrs. Stock at a Social Gathering on October 24th, and a memorable “ Induction’ service took place

on November 1|4th.

1929.—Early in the year the Committee carried out extensive repairs to the premises, viz. : pointing, slating, and spouting, and later the whole of the outside was repainted.

Aucust.—By the death of Miss Gaukrodger the Church lost a most devoted worker, for many years a Teacher in the School. She was one of the first Lady Deacons. Mrs. I’. Riding was elected to the vacancy on the Diaconate.

The Church became a Corporate Member of the League of Nations Union.

The “ in Trinity Street was sold by private treaty and the balance of proceeds passed to the Reserve Fund.

In response to Dr. Berry’s appeal, a large bale of clothing and £15 in cash was sent to the distressed areas of South Wales shortly before Christmas.

Photographs of all the past ministers of Milton Church were framed and hung in the Minister’s Vestry.

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OctToBER 2nd.—A well attended meeting of the Church and congregation met to consider what steps should be taken to celebrate suitably the Jubilee of the Church in 1931 and after hearing the proposal of the Managing Committee, the following resolution was carried unanimously with enthusiasm, viz.: “ That this meeting of the Milton Church and Congregation and associated Societies, recognis- ing the desirability of freeing the Church from Ground rent, decides that a fund be raised by subscription for the purpose of buying the site of the Church and Schools as a Jubilee Celebration.”” A representative committee was elected to put the resolution into effect and an appeal was launched with promises amounting

to £741 towards the £2000 asked for.

1930.—In March, the Annual Meeting of the Yorkshire Congregational Union was held in Huddersfield and “* Miltonians ”’ were called upon to take their share of the work involved in making the necessary arrangements. Mr. Ernest Woodhead was appointed President, and Rev. Herbert Stock Secretary, of the General Committee, and Mr. Norman Revell the Secretary of the Hospitality ome The meetings were held in Highfield Church and were “ unusually successful.

Early in the year a new hot water boiler was fixed to the apparatus in the Church.

Interior cleaning and re-decoration were carried out in the Assembly Hall, Milton Room, and practically all the rooms except the Church. New lights were fixed in the School. A new lavatory for men’s use was made and fitted up in one of the large disused classrooms and many interior repairs and renovations were carried out.

In making the extensive repairs, renovations and extensions during the past two years, the Committee has carried out the wish of the Congregation to have the premises in an attractive and comfortable condition for the Jubilee Celebrations. The cost has been heavy but the whole expense has been met from the Repairs and Renewals Reserve and no appeal for special effort has been needed.

Mr. Ernest Woodhead elected President of the Huddersfield and District Congregational Council for 1931.

OctToBER 24TH.—Huddersfield and District Congregational Council At Home ”’ and Rally held in the Assembly Hall. Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Woodhead acted as Host and Hostess and “ received ’’ a large number of guests. A very enjoyable evening was spent.

NOovEMBER.—Spanish Operetta promoted by members of the Sunday School and friends in aid of the Jubilee Fund.

Selection of favourite hymns, vespers, etc., added to the Hymnary ‘as an Appendix.

Page 53

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