Huddersfield School Board: Annual Report of the Board's Inspector of Schools for 1882-3 (1883) by Samuel Brown Tait

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HUDDERSFIELD SCHOOL BOARD.

ANNUAL REPORT BOARD'S INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS,

1882-3.

HUDDERSFIELD:

MDCCCLXXXIII,

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as savas

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School Board.

BOARD INSPECTOR’S REPORT.

SEPTEMBER 6TH, 1883.

Io the Chairman of the School Management and General . Purposes Commuttee.

SIR,

I beg to submit my report on the educational condition of the Board's Schools, for the year 1882-3. Its perusal will show that the year has been one of steady progress, both as regards the number of children brought under educational influences,—seen in the increase in the number on the registers and the daily average attendance,—and also as regards the efficiency of the scholars,—seen in the increased grant earned, and the higher percentage of passes at the Government Examinations.

SCHOOL ACCOMMODATION.

As no new School has been opened by the Board during the year—though there is a new building in course of erection at Paddock, to take the place of the temporary premises there—and no School has been enlarged, the accommodation remains the same as last year, there being school places for 9,716 children.

I should point out, however, that the accommodation no longer suffices to meet the wants of the population in several districts. At Crosland Moor Mixed, Oakes Boys’, Mount Pleasant Boys’, and Mount Pleasant Infants’ Departments, the Teachers have been obliged to turn from the doors a considerable number of children seeking admission, to prevent the attendance exceeding the accommodation for which the Schools have been sanctioned by the Education Department. The subject demands the serious consideration of the Board.

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There are at present under the Board 14 Schools, consisting of 33 Departments, viz., 7 for Boys, 7 for Girls, 5 for Mixed, and 14 for Infants, taught by 12 Head Masters and 21 Head Mistresses, who are assisted by 21 Certificated Assistant Masters, 39 Certificated Assistant Mistresses, 36 Ex-Pupil Teachers, 88 Pupil Teachers, and 13 Candidate Pupil Teachers, making a total teaching staff of 230.

SCHOOL ATTENDANCE.

The average number on the registers of the Board Schools during the past year has been 9,130; the corresponding number for the previous year was 8,848, shewing an increase of 282, which is at the rate of 3 per cent., or more than double the annual rate of increase in the population. That may be looked upon as satisfactory. It is calculated by the Education Department that one-sixth of the popula- tion should be on the books of the Public Elementary Schools. In Huddersfield the number on the books is nearly ome fifth of the population ; and the work of getting the children of school age on the registers of efficient schools may be said to have been accomplished.

When we approach the question of the regularity with which the children attend, the result is not so satisfactory. The average attendance in the Board Schools has risen during the year from 6,925 to 7,217 (including 31 children not reckoned for purposes of grant) ; that is an increase of 292, or 4 per cent. But an attendance of 7,217 out of g,130 on the books is an attendance only of 79 per cent. It may, per- haps, be some satisfaction to know that we are not so bad as our neighbours, that the percentage of attendance to the number on the books is only 72°4 per cent. for Board Schools throughout the country, 71°8 per cent. for Voluntary Schools, and even for Scotland only 75:8 per cent.; but it is a poor satisfaction after all. No one who seriously considers it, but must deplore the fact that each time the school roll is called, 21 children out every 100 are absent. How this irregu- larity in attendance interferes with the progress, not only of the irregular scholars, but of the others also, none but those actually engaged in teaching can realise. I venture to say that Io per cent. is ample allowance for absence through half-time employment, sickness, and other legitimate causes; and that we ought never to rest satisfied until go per cent. of the children on the rolls are in daily attendance.

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To whom are we to look for the attainment of so desirable an object? Mainly to the teachers and the attendance officers. The teachers can do much, by making school as bright and pleasant a place as possible, from which the children would not willingly stay away, and by sending regularly after the absentees, thus letting the parents see that the absence of their children is noticed. They have to aid them in their endeavours the prize scheme for regular attendance, and that feeling in favour of education which is slowly but surely penetrating downwards in society.

The attendance officers are but four in number ; by the necessities of the case, they are only able to deal with the worst offenders, and to visit the homes of the irregulars once in four or five weeks. That, in my opinion, is not frequently enough. The late Clerk of the Board, in his triennial report for 1878-80, pointed out, even at that time, the need of another attendance officer. He said—‘‘After an experience of more than six years of compulsory attendance, I am of opinion that four attendance officers are not sufficient. A district with such a large school population, and so large an area as Huddersfield possesses, cannot be efficiently worked with that number of officers.” Since that time the number of children of school age has materially increased, yet the number of attendance officers has remained the same.

In addition to the educational reasons in favour of increasing the number of such officers, there is a financial one which has special weight at the present time. Under the New Code which has come into operation, the whole of the public grants to schools will be computed on the basis of the average attendance. Exactly in pro- portion as the average attendance is improved will the grant be increased ; and with such a margin for improvement as I have pointed out, there can hardly be a doubt that the cost of employing another attendance officer would be more than met by the increased grant.

Connected with the subject of attendance is the

PRIZE SCHEME.

Out of 9,130 children on the books 3,266 have obtained Prizes for regular and punctual attendance, as against 3,088 last year ; and 604 of these, or 64 per cent. of the number on the books, have never been absent or late during the year, compared with 563 last year. It might

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be thought that with so large a proportion gaining prizes, the conditions of prize-earning could not be very difficult ; but that is not so; no child could obtain a prize who had not gained at least two quarterly certifi- cates in the year, and these certificates were not given to any who had been late or absent more than three times. The amount spent in prizes has been £297 Ios. 6d., being an increase upon the previous year of £21 11s. gd. Particulars of the number of prizes gained. and the amount spent in each school are given in Table IV.

During the year the Board has revised the Prize Scheme, believing that the time has come when, without injury to the attendance, the conditions of prize-earning might be made more stringent, and the value of the prizes somewhat reduced. In future, instead of quarterly certificates, weekly tickets will be given every Friday to all who have not been absent or late during the week ; and at the end of the School Year all who have not been absent or late once will obtain a prize of the first class; all who have missed one ticket a prize of the second class, and those who have missed two tickets a prize of the third class.

The advantage of the weekly ticket system over the quarterly is two-fold, it brings before the children every week, instead of once in three months, the importance of regular and punctual attendance ; and, in the next place it is a means of informing the parents of the way in which their children are attending; if a child comes home on Friday afternoon without a ticket, the parents know the child has been either late or absent during the week.

As a stimulus to producing excellent work, the Board has decided to give one additional prize in every class in each school for Proficiency and Good Conduct; two-thirds of the marks will be given for proficiency at my examination, the remainder by the Head Teacher, for good conduct.

RESULTS OF THE GOVERNMENT EXAMINATIONS.

By reference to Table II., it will be seen that 7,183 children— 5.478 over seven years of age, and 1,705 under seven—or 78:7 per cent. of the number on the books, qualified themselves by making 250 attendances, or 150 as half-timers, for presentation to Her Majesty’s Inspector, and that of this number per cent. were actually presented. These figures show an increase upon the previous year of 343 qualified,

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and 342 presented ; the percentage of children qualified having gone up from 75°9 per cent. to 78:7. The corresponding percentage for England is 70°2 per cent.

NUMBER IN THE HIGHER STANDARDS.—Of the children presented for examination, 36°2 per cent. were in the Upper Standards (1V.—VI]I) compared with 34'9 per cent. the year before; these figures are very encouraging ; they show that an increasingly large number of children remain at school sufficiently long to receive the benefit of the teaching given in the Upper Standards. The percentage of children in the _Upper Standards in the Scotch Schools is 36°7, so that practically we have reached their high level. The percentage for England is 28°3.

THE THREE R’s.—In each of the three essential subjects the passes show an improvement upon those of the previous year; the percentage of passes in Reading has increased from g1‘7 per cent. to 92°2; in Writing, from 87°1 per cent. to 88°8; in Arithmetic, from 86°9 per cent. to 87:8; and the total average from 88°6 per cent. to 89°6, which is the highest that has yet been reached by the Huddersfield Board Schools. It is interesting to compare our position in this respect with the Board Schools throughout the country, the Voluntary Schools, and the Scotch Schools, as given in the Blue Book just issued.

Percentage of Passes in :—

Reading. Writing. Arithmetic. Average. iis an > ORS i BOS. ATS. ns : BQ Scotland . ont 3. Se a Sa. cee Board Schools i in 1 England ao. Mee OE <1 One oes ,, ... S09. ... S0°7 .F5'O une, BI

It will be seen from Table II. that the passes in the Infants’ Departments (Standard I.) reached 94°7 per cent.; in Girls’ Depart- ments go°3; in Boys’ Departments 89°8; and in Mixed Departments 85°3. The girls have beaten the boys in reading and writing, but have fallen a little behind in arithmetic.

Of the 14 Infants’ Schools under the Board none have passed 100 per cent.; I am not sorry; for, except in very small schools, it is ee to do it without resorting to that unnatural system of ‘‘ cramming,’ which is so much to be deprecated. Only two of the 14 schools have fallen below go per cent., and they have passed 88 and 8g per cent. respectively.

Of the 7 Boys’ Departments, 3 have passed over go per cent.— Berry Brow, Beaumont Street, and Moldgreen; Berry Brow standing first with 95°8 per cent. None of the others have fallen below 85°8.

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Three also of the 7 Girls’ Departments have passed over go per cent.—Hillhouse, Moldgreen, and Stile Common; Hillhouse heading I the list with 95°8 per cent. The lowest percentage among the girls is Bary. 7 The highest percentage in the 5 Mixed Departments is 87:6 ; and one, the new School at Deighton, which had been open 10 months at the time of the examination, did not reach per cent.

CLASS SUBJECTS.—Two Class Subjects have been taken in all our Schools, Grammar and Geography being the two almost invariably selected, History being taken in a few cases instead of either Geography or Grammar. All the Schools, with the exception of the new Deighton School, which only gained the grant for one subject, succeeded in passing their classes in both subjects, and in earning the full grant.

Needlework is taken in all the Girls’, Mixed, and Infants’ Schools, as an essential subject, but no separate grant is given for it.

SPECIFIC SUBJECTS.—Of the scholars presented to H.M. Inspec- tor 12 per cent. were examined and passed successfully in one or more specific subjects; the corresponding percentage for the country is 6. Table II. gives the number passing in each school. English Literature is the favourite subject, in which 275 passed; Domestic Economy for girls comes next, with 228 passes ; then Animal Physiology, with 70 ; Physical Geographpy, with 30; French, with 14; Mechanics, with 12 ; and Mathematics, with 7 passes.

DRAWING.—Drawing is taught to a greater extent than was the case last year, and with increasing success, as will be seen from Table III., which gives the passes at the examinations in connexion with the Science and Art Department, South Kensington. While the number examined has increased 5 per cent., the number of passes has increased 24 per cent., and the number obtaining certificates 36 per cent. The number of papers examined was 2,284; of which 81 were marked ‘excellent,’ 447 ‘ good,’ and 1,344 ‘ fair,’ making the total passes 1,852. The Drawing Grant has increased from £100 os. 4d. to £132 3s. 8d., an increase for the year of 32 per cent.

GOVERNMENT GRANT.

The Government Grant for the year is £6,332 17s. 4d., being an increase of £298 gs. 4d., and is at the rate of 17s. 74d. per head on the average attendance, as against 17s. 53d. last year. This is gratifying, not merely from a financial point of view, but educationally, as the grant

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is the most reliable educational barometer, rising and falling with the efficiency of the schools. The amount per head, 17s. 74d., is the highest that has yet been reached by the Huddersfield Board Schools. © It is a source of satisfaction that the last year under the Old Code should be the best the Schools have seen, both in the matter of grant and passes.

The Moldgreen Girls’ School has the honour of obtaining the largest grant per head, namely, £1 os. 63d.; the largest grant per head among the Boys’ Departments was {1 os. 64$d., earned at Berry Brow ; the largest among the Mixed Departments, £1 os. 34d., at Almondbury ; and the largest for an Infants’ Department, 17s. 44d., at Brierley Wood. In no School last year did the grant reach £1 per head. In three Schools this year it has exceeded that amount.

Following the practice of previous years, I proceed to compare the amount earned by the Huddersfield Board Schools, with the. amounts earned by the eight principal Boards, as given in the I

Parliamentary Blue Book just issued. Amount of Grant

per Head. I I Be. 30. Huddersfield 21. 17 74 besa. 17 54 og skis Sere eee 17 4 WN eos» wer sts deus einige I7 2+ NE 16 10% IN oy cents dss cee septs 16 o# I gars «wicks op so cop wuss 16 94 Bradford ....... ean gs « nv chy > 16 9g Bp Ne Veh tae: 15 104

The grant for Board Schools throughout the country is at the rate of 16s. 2d. per head; for Voluntary Schools, 15s. gd.; and the average grant for all Schools, 16s. ofd.

SCHOOL MAINTENANCE.

Board Schools depend for their maintenance upon funds derived from three main sources—the Government Grant, the School Fees of the children, and the Local Rates. On turning to Table V. of this report, and the Blue Book to which reference has already been made,

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we find the following to be the amounts derived from these sources for each child in average attendance in the Huddersfield Board Schools and the Board Schools throughout the country :—

Government School Local Grant. Fees. Rates. a. 0, $.. .G. PENG iis sd Bsns tenis 19 9} >i, TO Board Schools throughout England... 16 2 ... 9 4 «. I7 Oo

Thus, while in the Huddersfield Schools the receipts from Government Grant are 1s. 54d. per head more, and from School Fees ts. 64d. more than the receipts of Board Schools generally, the work of education is carried on at a cost to the ratepayers of 2s. 43d. per child less than the average for Board Schools.

PUPIL TEACHERS.

In my last report I had to deplore the fact that, notwithstanding the improvement which had taken place in the year, 24 of the pupil teachers were, at the examination by Her Majesty’s Inspector, placed ‘‘below fair.” This year it gives me the greatest pleasure to say that not one has been so placed. To show the improvement, I place side by side the figures for the two previous years.

1880-1. 1881-2. 1882-3. No.. passing ‘‘ well ’”’......... ae cas Ene 37 No, passing “fatie” 5.04... WO ices $6 51 No, passing “ below fair”... 43 98 a3

As a consequence, the grant for the successful passing of pupil teachers has increased this year from £164 13s. 4d. to £204 3s. 4d., or 24 per cent.

I believe the improvement is, in a large measure, due to the quickening influence of the Pupil Teachers’ Classes, originated by Mr. Graves, late Her Majesty’s Inspector of the district, and continued and further developed by the Board. It has been my practice to take round with me on my visits to the schools the papers worked by the pupil teachers at their quarterly examinations in connexion with the Pupil Teachers’ Association, calling attention to the weak points. This, I have reason to believe, has proved helpful in many cases to the pupil teachers.

One of the most important acts of the Board during the past year has been the organizing of the

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II PUPIL TEACHERS’ CLASSES

to which reference has been made. The voluntary classes which had been held as an experiment the previous winter had proved so success- ful, that the Board resolved to put them on a more permanent basis, and further develop them. Profiting by experience, it was decided to make the attendance of the Board’s pupil teachers compulsory ; for it had been found that the most regular attenders at the voluntary classes were those who could best have dispensed with their aid, while those who needed them most did not attend at all, or only irregularly. The Board’s pupil teachers were to be admitted free, and assistant-teachers in Board Schools and pupil teachers in other schools charged a small fee. Again, it was determined that the classes should meet con- tinuously through the year, and not in the winter months only, as had been the case in the voluntary classes; such a course was absolutely necessary, if a foreign language was to be studied.

The classes were in no way to interfere with the responsibility of the head teachers to instruct their pupil teachers in the syllabus prescribed by the Education Department; but were intended to extend the knowledge and train the intelligence of the pupil teachers in two special directions,—Literature and Science; as regards Literature, to make them students of another language than their own, and to open up to them the rich body of literature in their own language; as regards Science, to learn its method, rather than to ‘‘cram” the facts concerning any special branch.

No efforts were spared to obtain the very best teachers available in the neighbourhood. For French, the services of Mons. P. H. M. du Gillon, French Master at the Huddersfield College, were secured ; for Latin, the Rev. E. Whitehead; for English Literature, Mr. W. C. Massey, B.A., of London and Victoria Universities; and for Botany, Mr. Boyd Joll, M.B., London. The Singing Classes which had been established by the Board, were incorporated with these classes, and taught by Mr. D. W. Evans, the Singing Instructor of the Board Schools. All the classes meet at the Spring Grove School, which, from its situation and internal arrangements, is admirably adapted for such classes. ‘

The pupil teachers of the second, third, and fourth years of apprenticeship meet on Wednesday evenings, from 6 to 7 for Botany, and from 7 to 8 for English Literature. The scheme for Literature

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embraces a three years’ course, so that the pupil teachers during their apprenticeship cover the whole period of English Literature. In Science, as in Literature, the pupil teachers of the second, third, and fourth years are taught together, a fresh subject being taken at the end of each year. The Science Class has been affiliated with South Kensington; but I should be extremely sorry if that in any degree led to the main object of the classes being lost sight of, which was not to ‘‘cram ”’ for an examination, but to bring the pupil teachers face to face with nature, and teach them how to study and interpret its facts.

On Saturday mornings, the classes are held from 9 The pupil teachers of the first and second years take French ; those of the third and fourth years, Latin ; and all attend one or other of the Singing Classes.

The rough notes taken at the classes are re-written and expanded at home, and shown by the pupil teachers to their respective head teachers on the Thursday morning of each week. To give them more - time for study, the pupil teachers are liberated from teaching one afternoon a week; and this is generally given to the work of these classes.

One of the head masters under the Board is present at each meeting to record the attendances; the register is periodically inspected by me, and the absences noted, followed by enquiry as to the cause of absence when I next visit the schools. I am glad to say, however, that absence is extremely rare, and that evident interest is taken in the classes by most of the pupil teachers.

There are at the present time, 152 names on the register—r1o1 from Board Schools, and 51 outsiders. The average attendance in the classes, since their commencement has been :—French, 63 ; Elementary Latin, 44; Advanced Latin, 13; Botany, 62; English Literature, 65 ; Elementary Singing, 59; Advanced Singing, 51.

INSTRUCTION OF PUPIL TEACHERS BY THEIR HEAD TEACHERS.

It was my duty some short time ago to inquire into the amount of time spent by the pupil teachers in their home lessons, and the methods of instruction pursued by the head teachers. I found that the

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time occupied nightly in the preparation of home lessons was as follows :—

Monitors and Candidates from 1 hour to 3 hours; average time 2 hours.

First Year Pupil Teachers ,, 2 ,, 33. sC«ss ss Sic, Second Year wae” Ot ws ae Third Year a op Bo ME oe ‘9 23 Fourth Year apt: Ae M2 in 3i

I am of opinion that 14 hours for monitors and candidates, from 2 to 24 hours for first and second year pupil teachers, with an additional half-hour for the last two years of apprenticeship are ample to do the work prescribed in the Code. Yet some pupil teachers, after a hard day’s work at school, sit down to four and even five hours’ study at home. It is worth while to inquire into the causes of the excessive strain in those cases.

In the first place, let me say, it is not due to the requirements of the Code. No one who remembers that before apprenticeship a pupil teacher must have passed the three essential subjects and two class subjects of the Sixth Standard, will contend that the curriculum for pupil teachers is too ambitious.

In some cases I found the long hours were due, not to the amount of home lessons set, but the pupil teachers’ own want of method and slowness in learning. A little advice and guidance from the head teachers would enable such pupil teachers to get through their work -more expeditiously. Much, too, might be done by the pupil teachers themselves to shorten the hours of study, if they would set apart a portion of each evening for the preparation of their lessons, and make a determined effort to get them done in the time.

The long hours in some cases were to be attributed to a want of forethought on the part of the head teachers. If the work is to be evenly distributed, it is essential that the head teacher, immediately after each quarterly examination, should ascertain from the syllabus and text books what amount of work has to be prepared by the next examination, and divide it sothat it can be done without hurry, leaving sufficient time for recapitulation. When this is not done, the inevitable result is cramming and long hours as the examination approaches. As an example of the want of good judgment, I may mention the giving of but one subject to be studied each night. It is not surprising that after poring for three hours over the same subject the mind is wearied and the results not commensurate with the time and labourexpended. I am

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convinced that, for most pupil teachers, more than an hour’s study at any one subject is labour thrown away. More work would be done in the time, and with less strain, if there were a little variety in the evening’s lessons. It would be a relief, for example, to turn from History to Map Drawing, or from Arithmetic to Geography.

The employment of assistant teachers in this connexion calls for remark. The Board permits head teachers to avail themselves of the services of their certificated assistants in the instruction of pupil teachers. Several head teachers do without this help. Their motive is a laudable one; they prefer to do everything themselves, and then they will be sure it is well done. But in so doing they are certainly not making the most of the hour for instruction,—which is all too short at the best,— the pupil teachers are in different years of apprenticeship, each with their own separate work in Geography, History, &c.; while one pupil teacher is being heard the others are losing time. Why not have one or more of the certificated assistants present to hear some of the lessons ? It will not be necessary for them to be present the whole of the hour, as some of the work, such as Parsing, Analysis, Composition, Etymology, School Management, and Reading can be taken collectively.

An error-of a quite opposite kind is the handing over of one or more of the pupil teachers to an assistant, who sets their work, hears their lessons, and practically takes the place of the head teacher. It is not to be expected that assistants, with their limited experience, will be able to apportion the work with the same discretion as the head teacher. I therefore think, that while assistants may with advantage be employed to hear some of the lessons that have been prepared, it is better that the head teachers should set the lessons themselves. The relegating of this duty to the assistants I found to be the cause in some instances of an undue amount of time being spent by the pupil teachers over their lessons.

In but few schools does Drawing find a place in the pupil teachers’ studies. It is, unfortunately, left till near the Drawing Examination, when it receives an undue share of attention, to the disarrangement of the ordinary work, and the detriment of other subjects. I

In my report last year, I called attention to the necessity for instructing the pupil teachers in the principles and art of teaching. I regret to say that still little is done in this direction. The pupil

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teachers are left to pick up their ideas from their own experience and mistakes, or cut and dried from some text-book, as best they may. I am sure teachers would be richly repaid if they would hold familiar talks with their pupil teachers, on the best methods of teaching the different subjects and managing their classes, and why those methods are the best. It would infuse an interest into the daily work of the pupil teachers, and we should hear less about mechanical results than we do now.

I would suggest that, as the pupil teachers have no lessons to prepare on the Wednesday night in consequence of having to attend the Pupil Teachers’ Classes, it would be well if the hour for instruction on the Thursday morning were divided between such instruction as I have referred to and the study of the two books prescribed for the year in English Literature—J. R. Green’s ‘“‘ Selections from the Sfectator,” and ‘* Poetry for the Young.” I know nothing that would exercise a greater quickening influence upon the minds of the pupil teachers than the intelligent study ot such books. In this connexion I am glad to say that a large number of the pupil teachers avail themselves of the opportunity of borrowing books from the Pupil Teachers’ Library, which was established last year. Head teachers might help their pupil teachers in this matter, by guiding them in the selection of interesting and useful books suited to their varied tastes. The Library is open to the teachers both of Board and Voluntary Schools, on the second and fourth Saturdays of each month. Close upon goo volumes have been taken out in the year, by 138 borrowers.

Having dealt with the results of the Government Examinations as affecting both scholars and pupil teachers, and with the important subject of the instruction of pupil teachers, it may not be uninteresting to the Board if I make some observations upon the

TEACHING IN THE SCHOOLS as the result of my yearly examinations and my visits from time to time.

READING.—1 place this subject first, not only because it is first in intrinsic importance, but because, if sensibly taught, it exercises a greater educative influence than any other subject taught in the school. For a ‘pass’ I require, in the first place, mechanical accuracy; if a child trips over little words, carelessly says his words twice, he fails.

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In the next place, fluency and fairly intelligent expression, are looked for to secure a good pass. One occasionally comes across a class in which the reading is broken and jolting ; though generally speaking, it is fluent ; but I am bound to say that really intelligent, expressive reading is comparatively rare. A child who talks naturally enough to a com- panion in the playground, the moment he takes up a book, adopts an artificial tone. It never seems to have dawned upon him that reading is but talking—talking from a book, instead of out of one’s head.

There is often too great an anxiety on the part of the teacher to get through the books, the reading lesson degenerating into a mere hearing the scholars read in turn, the teacher interposing only to help the child with some word he cannot pronounce. The result is a verification of the proverb: ‘ More haste, worse speed.” It would repay teachers to say a few words on the subject of the lesson before the reading begins, so as to awaken an interest in what is read, and to interpose a few questions as the lesson proceeds in order to ascertain whether the minds of the pupils are being carried along with the words, as it is utterly impossible a child can read well what he does not understand. It is not enough to explain the meaning of difficult words, the main necessity is that the drift of the passage shall be under- stood, and its connexion with what precedes and follows. When I assure myself that a child has no understanding of what he is reading, I . fail him, no matter how glibly he can run over the words; for ability to gabble over a page of print, without the remotest idea of what it all means, is valueless.

The reading of the girls is vastly superior to that of the boys, though the boys are improving. It is a treat to listen to the distinct enunciation, pure pronunciation, pleasant modulation of the voice and intelligent expression in a few of our Girls’ Schools. In Mixed Schools the reading of the boys-is better than that in Boys’ Schools. I suppose it is to be attributed to the civilising and refining influence of the girls.

3 WRITING.—In a few of the schools the Writing, both in copy books and on dictation papers, is really excellent; but generally I am not able to give the Writing a high mark. Not sufficient attention is given to the subject during the year. Some teachers put the ordinary copy books aside as the examination approaches, and give out new books, a few pages of which are written with extra care to show the Inspector ;

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I attach no value to such books and invariably ask to see the ordinary copy books. There cannot be a doubt as to what the intention of the Code is, and it is to be hoped that the practice of changing the books, which cannot have a good influence on the children, will be dis- continued.

It appears to be a general impression, particularly amongst the younger teachers, that the copy book lesson is one that may be left to take care of itself, affording a favourable opportunity for marking home lessons, correcting dictation exercises, writing notes, &c. In no subject is supervision more essential ; without it the time spent on the lesson is worse than wasted. In some schools there is a practice which I should like to see universal, of spending five minutes at the beginning of every copy book lesson in teaching the formation of letters from the blackboard, and in calling attention to the position of the body and the holding of the pen in writing. If this were done we should not so often find children writing in a cramped position, with pen held near the point between a screwed up finger and thumb. In one of our schools the writing is taught without copy heads, the teacher writing the copy on the blackboard and calling attention to the strokes and curves of which the letters are formed, where to begin and how to complete them, the children imitating the teacher letter by letter. When the copy is set, the teacher passes among the children, noticing mistakes, and calling the attention of the class to them. The effect is to secure uniformity in writing; but this system needs a good writer to set the copy. __

ARITHMETIC.—I can see an improvement in the Arithmetic in most of the schools; but the subject is still too frequently taught without regard to the principles underlying the different processes, and the applica- tion of the rules to the transactions of every-day life. I have found classes so perfect in their mechanical drill that they would work a long subtraction sum without a slip, but if you asked them to find the difference between two numbers, they were non-plussed; if told to divide a number by 8, every child in the cJass would do it right ; but if asked for the eighth part of the same number they looked bewildered, and were as likely to multiply as to divide. When the teacher’s attention has been called to it, the answer has been that ‘“ problems ” are left for the last part of the year, and that “ the class has not got to problems yet.”

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I cannot conceive a greater mistake than to make children perform day after day for 10 months in the year certain arithmetical processes, before ever teaching them the meaning of those processes, or to what practical uses they are put. ‘ Problems,” instead of being something dreadful, to be kept off as long as possible, if sensibly constructed by the teacher, excite the interest of the children, and give variety to what is otherwise a monotonous exercise. I do what I can to check the unintelligent teaching of this subject by setting out of every four sums at my examinations two that require a little thought, and which cannot be worked by calculating machines.

In Infants’ Schools I have had to complain of the habit of counting on the fingers. It is easily acquired; not so easily left off. I have seen it cling to children two years after they have left the Infants’ School. It is better never to begin it.

MENTAL ARITHMETIC is now well taught in most of the schools, a few minutes being devoted to it at the beginning of every arithmetic lesson, which is much better than giving a whole lesson to it. In my reports on separate schools, I had often to deprecate the restriction of the Mental Arithmetic to purely abstract numbers. Since then, in my visits to the schools, I have found that questions of a common-sense character,

dealing with matters of every-day experience, are fairly mixed with those on abstract numbers.

SPELLING is taught systematically in but few schools, nor will it be so long as the dictation at the Government Examination is taken from the reading books used in the school. What the teacher, who is ‘“‘ wise in his generation,” does to secure a good pass in dictation, is to select from the reading books used in the class all the likely passages for dictation, and drill the scholars in these. How successfully this may be done by a wide-awake teacher, may be gathered from the fact that at one school I chose five pieces for dictation before I hit upon one that had not been taken by the class. By this means, it is possible for a

class to pass well, and not be good spellers, knowing nothing of the way in which words are built up.

COMPOSITION is a subject of considerable importance in a child’s education. When he leaves school he should be able to commit his thoughts to paper intelligently. But Composition is generally poor in the Fifth Standard, while tolerably good in the Sixth. The Fifth Standard is the first standard in which children are examined in Composition, but

Page 19

Tg

it is a mistake not to teach the subject until the children reach that standard. When that is the case, the failures invariably are numerous. If children were taught in the Third Standard to make little sentences of their own and write them down, and in the Fourth Standard to write connectedly, the composition papers would be very different from what they are now.

GEOGRAPHY is the favourite class subject, and, as a rule, is satis- factorily taught, though there are still to be found teachers who seem to be under the delusion that they have taught Geography well when their scholars are able to repeat a string of names, and can point out the north and south on a map without having any idea as to where the actual north and south are. Generally speaking, the Geography would be more interesting if it were more descriptive and pictorial.

Sometimes, when I have not been able to get answers to certain questions, I have been told that the class has not touched that part of the subject since the beginning of the year. There would be no necessity for that explanation if a few minutes of each lesson were spent in recapitulating work previously done. It would fasten the lessons more firmly in the children’s minds, would do away with the necessity for so much ‘“‘ grinding” before the Government Examination, and enable classes to obtain the mark ‘‘ good” that at present get only ‘ fair.”

Map Drawing is practised to a greater extent than formerly. Those shown to me at Beaumont Street Boys’ School would, for correct outline, delicate tinting and careful printing, do credit to the students in a Training College.

GRAMMAR, appealing more to the reason, and less to the imagina- tion than Geography, wants a really good teacher to make it interesting. It is not so well taught as Geography, especially by young teachers, who treat it too mechanically, and as a matter of definition and memory.

HISTORY has been taken instead of Grammar or Geography in one or two schools, but not with much success. In future, children in all the Upper Departments will, through the History Reading Books insisted upon in the New Code, acquire a very fair knowledge of the history of their own country.

NEEDLEWORK receives much attention in the Girls’, Mixed, and Infants’ Schools, and is well reported upon by Her Majesty’s Inspector.

Page 20

20

There is a tendency in some cases to spend too much time over it in making elaborate garments for the examination day.

SPECIFIC SUBJECTS —I have already alluded to these, and need not do more here than say that for the present at any rate a falling off in them may be expected under the New Code, as Literature and Physical Geography are removed from the list of Specific Subjects and incor- porated with the ordinary work. Two Specific Subjects may be taken in any school, but for the first year or two under the New Code it will be wise not to attempt more than one.

S/INGING.—Until the appointment of Mr. D. W. Evans, as Singing Instructor, less than a year ago, Singing was almost entirely taught by ear,a whole Department being taken together, or at most in two divisions; now it is taught by note the schools—Infants’ as well as Upper— and there are at least four divisions in each of the Upper Departments, thus securing more individual teaching. Mr. Evans visits each Depart- ment twice in three weeks, and supervises the teaching, occasionally taking a class himself. On the Saturday morning he takes two classes of pupil teachers, elementary and advanced; on Wednesday evening two similar classes of head and assistant teachers ; on Monday evening a special class of 250 girls from the schools preparing for their certi- ficates ; and on Friday evening a similar class of 250 boys. As the outcome of Mr. Evans’ labours, 154 scholars have already obtained the Tonic Sol-fa Junior Certificate, while among the teachers 96 Elemen- tary Certificates and 4o Intermediate Certificates of the Tonic Sol-fa College have been taken.

DRAWING.—1 have already referred to the Drawing results in connexion with the South Kensington Examinations. I have only to add here that drawing is also taught in the Infants’ Schools as one of the Kindergarten exercises, and is liked by the children. The teacher draws her copy on the blackboard, the children imitating on their slates; and it is wonderful what taste and skill are shown by some of the little ones.

OBJECT LESSONS.—Under the influence of what is now, happily, the ‘‘ Old Code,’’ Object Lessons almost disappeared from the schools ; under the New Code, they will form an essential part of the curriculum of Infants’ Schools and the lower classes of Upper Schools. I am glad of it; for the routine for Standard I. children, more particularly in the Upper Departments, was dreary in the extreme; the same unvaried

Page 21

2I

round of Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic—‘ Week in, week out, from morn. till night ’—deadened, if it did not kill, any germ of intellectual life that might be in the children.

DISCIPLINE.—It is not possible to attach too much importance to discipline. Without it, a teacher spends his strength for nought. Weak discipline is seen in the results at an examination ; the bright and attentive children do well; but there is another section who are nearly as ignorant at the end of the year as they were at the beginning. The teacher has had no influence over them. Great disparity of work in the same class always strikes me as a sign of weak discipline.

In a few schools the discipline is really excellent. I might specially mention the Moldgreen Infants’ School, Oakes Girls,’ and Paddock Mixed. In most it is satisfactory, the work being carried on with energy and spirit, yet without unnecessary noise. In a few schools only is it weak. The children in the Infants’ Schools particularly strike a visitor, with their clean, healthy, and happy-looking faces.

It is pleasing to notice the care that is taken in some of the schools to keep the room as tidy as possible, free from scraps of paper and books lying about, and to enliven the appearance of the room with window plants; and it is astonishing what a cheerful effect a few plants will give toa school. All this has an educative influence; it induces habits of personal tidiness in the children, and a neatness and finish in their work; and though it does not count in the passes and per- centages, it is worthy of praise and encouragement.

Sometimes the reason given for want of style and neatness in the work at my examinations, is that there are still two months till the Government Inspection, during which a “ polish” can be put on the work. ‘That is perfectly true; and the “ is generally given; but the effect upon the children must be bad, teaching them that slovenliness is permissible as a rule, tidiness required only on special occasions. It can be no matter of surprise if girls, for example, thus trained, are satisfied when they grow up, with dirty, untidy houses in the week, and a ‘clean up ” on Saturday. It would be much more satisfactory every way if the children were required to dotheir work as neatly as possible throughout the year, and so acquire a habit of painstaking and care in all their work, which would be of inestimable value to them in after life.

TEACHING v. EXAMINING.—The best results are invariably found

in schools where the head teacher spends a large proportion of his time

Page 22

22

in actual teaching ; not confining himself to one class, but passing from class to class, noting the weak points in the work and in the teacher’s methods, and showing his subordinates, by his own example, how to teach. It is far better for a head teacher to spend his time in this way than to be for ever examining the children and tabulating results.

SCHOLARSHIPS.

In my last report I regretted that there were in Huddersfield no Scholarships open to the children attending the Public Elementary Schools. Through the generosity of the Rev. F. Marshall, M.A. and Mr. Councillor B. Hanson, two such Scholarships have since been established. Every lover of education, knowing how Scholarships not only foster exceptional talent but raise the whole standard of education in the Upper Standards, will hope that the good example set may be followed by others.

In December last Mr. Councillor B. Hanson presented to the Board a Scholarship of the annual value of Fifteen Guineas, open to scholars who have attended the Board Schools for three years and passed the Sixth Standard; the Scholarship is tenable for three years at the Huddersfield College, the Collegiate, the Almondbury Grammar School, or—in the event of a girl gaining it—at the Girls’ College. At the competitive examination, which was held on April 7th, 18 boys and g girls presented themselves. The successful candidate proved to be James Varley, of the Moldgreen Board School, whose papers, with the exception of a rather weak Composition paper, were uniformly good. The papers of most of the candidates were very creditable, and evinced considerable intelligence.

In December last the Rev. F. Marshall, M.A., Head Master of the Almondbury Grammar School, offered to the Board a Scholarship of the yearly value of Ten Guineas, tenable for three years. As it is tenable only at the Almondbury Grammar School, it is open for competition among boys only; but unlike the ‘‘ Hanson Scholarship” it is not restricted to pupils attending Board Schools, but is open to boys attending any Public Elementary School in the Borough, outside the Parish of Almondbury, who have passed the Sixth Standard. At the examination, which was held by the Rev. F. Marshall, on April 14th, 14 candidates competed. The successful candidate was Roy Brier, of the Beaumont Street Board School.

Page 23

23

In February last, an examination was held for four scholaships, at the Almondbury Grammar School, entitling to free tuition for three years, the competition being open to scholars of Public Elementary Schools within the Parish of Almondbury. The competitors were 22 in number, and the successful candidates were G. E. Kendall (Berry Brow Board School), C. H. Jenkinson (Mount Pleasant Board School), E.

Houlgate (Berry Brow Board School), and B. Armitage (Mount Pleasant Board School).

HALF=TIME SCHOLARS.

There are in the Board Schools 446 half-timers, 264 of whom, having made the requisite number of attendances, were presented to Her Majesty’s Inspector for examination. The results of half-time education are anything but satisfactory. As might be expected, a large proportion of the failures in the upper standards are to be found among those who are obliged to miss half the lessons. When a boy becomes a half-timer> he soon falls behind his fellows, and is left farther and farther behind as the year The half-timers and full-timers are “‘ unequally yoked together.”” It would be better if they could be separated; to try to teach them together, is to do justice toneither. If the half-timers could be assembled in one school, as is the case in some large manufacturing towns, they could be taught according to a time-table specially adapted to them ; and their progress would be much more rapid.

There is another class of children for whom, if possible, some- thing should be done. I mean the

SEVENTH STANDARD CHILDREN.

A few are to be found at each school; but they are not sufficiently numerous for a separate teacher to be spared for them, so they take their chance with the Sixth Standard children, doing over again, to a great extent, work which they have done the year before. The parents of many of these children are in a position to keep them a year or two longer at school, and I have no doubt would, if there were more induce- ment to keep them there. If they were brought to a central school, such as Spring Grove, they would form a class sufficiently large to have a special teacher, under whom they could take up a foreign language, a

science subject in connexion with the Science and Art Department, and an advanced course of English.

Page 24

24 CAPRICIOUS REMOVALS.

In my last report I called attention to the frequent and capricious removal of children from school to school, and expressed the hope that some means might be devised of remedying the evil. A form of transfer, to be presented by scholars in seeking admission at another school, has been agreed upon by the Board and the Managers of the Voluntary Schools in the Borough, in the hope that it may lessen the frequent changing from school to school. But as it came into operation only a few weeks ago, it is too soon to speak of its effect.

PENNY BANKS.

The Penny Banks find increased favour with the scholars. There is now one in connexion with every Department; the number of depositors has increased during the year from 1,295 to 1,352; there have been 29,082 transactions as against 24,982 last year; the amount deposited has risen from £904 14s. 6d. to £1,014 2s. 11d.; £709 Is. od. as compared with £624 for the previous year has been transferred to the Huddersfield Savings Bank, and the amount standing to the credit of the children in the School Banks has gone up from £231 2s. 1od. to £509 4s. 2d. In this way’are children learning habits of thrift which will be of the utmost value to them when they grow up to be men and women. I

BOTANICAL RAMBLES.

Early in the year, Mr. S. L. Mosley, the Secretary of the Huddersfield Naturalists’ Society, kindly volunteered to take parties of children attending the Board Schools for country walks on Saturdays, with the view of teaching them to observe and take an interest in the common objects in nature. The Board accepted the offer with pleasure.

In consequence of the large number of scholars that expressed a wish to join in the rambles, it was found necessary to limit the number of schools taking part in each ramble, and also the number joining from each school.

On alternate Saturday afternoons, Mr. Mosley has met his group of ramblers—generally numbering about 30—who have assembled at one

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25

of the schools, and proceeded with them to such places as Mollicar, Honley Woods, Grimescar, Storthes Hall, directing their attention to wild flowers, insects, and other objects of interest that they meet with on the way. Mr. Mosley, in a short report upon the rambles, says :— ‘The girls have seemed to take more interest than the boys, and have turned up in greater numbers. I have tried not so much to bore them with lessons as to create interest,—to make the young mind anxious to find out something more than I have told them. For the winter, if I can see my way to it, the best plan to keep up the interest awakened would be to have demonstration lectures in the various schools, which, with the aid of the magic lantern, might be made enjoyable ; and, while they would teach, would lose the character of dry lessons.”

THE NEW CODE.

All the schools are now, working under the New Code, but as only one school has yet been examined under it, it would be premature to say anything with regard to its operation. There is, however, more work both for Teachers and Inspectors than under the Old Code ; niore importance is attached to the quality of the instruction than to the number of passes; and a higher premium set upon intelligence than upon mere mechanical accuracy.

In concluding my report, it is only due I should say that the Board is served by an earnest and capable body of teachers, who throw themselves with much heartiness into their work. If I have seemed to dwell upon the weak points rather than the excellencies in the work, it is because it is only by directing attention to these the schools can attain that high pitch of excellence which all desire. 7

I have the honour to be, Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

SAMUEL BROWN TAIT. JosepH H. Bower, Esg., Chairman of the School Management and : General Purposes Committee.

Page 26

TABLE

I, Comparison of Grants for the Years 1882 and 1883.

BOYS’ DEPARTMENTS.

Beaumont Street. Berry Brow. Hillhouse. Moldgreen. I Mount Pleasant.

Stile Common.

Totals.

Class

Grant

Month Averag Grant for :— Averag Standard Examination .... Examination ........ Specifi Ems EE OE ne at Decrease gS eae

1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1882 1882 1883

1883

s in School Year * e Attendance ......

=H uw rt

a RQ wa R a Cr} a a wa oR a Fy wm eR a J}

78 6 100 1 52 4 9 4 415 244 10 811 018 8$%

e Attendance ......

gas &

c

moococoo moooooo moocoooo

263 12 81 13 1110 07 12 10

018 93] 018 62

143 18 “69:4 018 33

ri

rt

0 CO CO =H

10 6 019 10

33 7 18

.

mooooooo wN

moooeooooo g So

ss © a

ain

189 £ 58. 56 14 70 9 37 12 4 16 6 175 11

018 63

1882

1883

1587

1637 £ 8. 491 2 641 19 827 4 42 16 44 5 1547 6 63 12

moocooceo

GIRLS’ DEPARTMENTS.

. "0 18 103

Beaumont Street. Berry Brow. Hillhouse. Moldgreen. Mount Pleasant.

Stile Common,

Months in School Year* Average Attendance ...... Grant for :— Average Attendance ...... Standard Class Examination ........ RE kk ues

as Grant per head...

1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1882 1883 1882 1882

246 -|£ 8. 73 16 105 8 49 4 12 10 12 10 253 8 273. 9 = 32 39 10

1 631 019 08

a R D R

Examination ....

171 11 49

019 83019 33

26 13 018 7

e

dt ee re 018 933 19 112

* The length of the School Year for all the Boys’ and Girls’ Departments both in 1882 and 1883 was 12 months, + This exceptionally large increase was due to the Grant for the Class Subjects having been withheld the previous year.

‘oa

Page 27

TABLE I.—Continued.

Comparison of Grants for the Years 1882 and 1883.

MIXED DEPARTMENTS.

Almondbury.

Crosland Moor.

Deighton.

Paddock.

Spring Grove.

Totals. 7

1882.

1883.

1882.

1883.

1882

1883.

1882.

1883.

1

882

1883- 1883

Months in School Year... as Average wi ‘a Grant for :— Average Attendance a Standard Examination .. Class Examination .. ae a Specific Subjects .. a a Pupil Teachers + vo 5 Total Grant .. 1150 1 Proportionate Grant for 12 months{150 Increase a es ake es Decrease és Ae Grant per head NP es

12

12 290 Sm &k 87 00 115 13

58 00°

1

OOO or OD 1D > S> So NN

0 6

re a)

12 284 ££ 6

10 158 £ « 4. 39 10 40 13 2 94 113 +113

11 193

wa R

53 61 35 1 151 164 +164

0

mMHO-:

7c OO: —

DNOO w=

tC I

12 1738* te Gi 51 18

rl re <H coo

N10 So OS — reir

1 NH OO SO "Oo wae

0 9 6

3

w

eared

16

12 525 & «a 157 10 195 105 10 8 476 476 23

1294 £ 392 12 460 244 19 23 1139 1158 119

IDO SO HD CO oooco°o°co re POO O49 19 Ht

18 17 10H

@ al oO

* The First Standard was retained in the Infants’ Department this year. + The First Grant for this Department.

Page 28

TABLE I.—Continued. Comparison of Grants for the Years 1882 and 1883.

INFANTS’ DEPARTMENTS.

Almondbury. Beaumont Street. Berry Brow. Brierley Wood. Crosland Moor. Deighton. Hillhouse.

1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 I 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883

Months in School Year ............ 12 12 ‘oa 4 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 aR +: 12 Average Attendance 15 69 221 233 118 121 82 103 154 162 145+ 126 236 230 Grant for :— £14 6 Gis £ 58. aS Average Attendance 2210 30 18 48 12 Infants Presented ..........+0---.4 29 O O|> *50 2 07 61 10 27 10 49 10

wa eR wa R wa a

SE Eun we 5: 4 ESI or fi! I 168 89 8 128 6 Proportionate Grant for 12 months] 59 14 168 181 19 89 8 128 6 180 18 '186 14 9 16 13 19 ee a . 2 23 10 118 ‘eae. See I 5 16 812 I

a] 015 22! 01572] 015 103] 01411] 016 03| 017 43) 016 43| 015 10] 016 43 01511! 015 33 016 22

181 19 93 18 0| 90 6 0] 65 18 180 18 186 14

93 18 0, 90 6 0] 65 18

OD oD oD

co ra <2 oO 15 15

d. 0] No Stanidard I. 7 16

a ° = occocoo a rei co re < rt tC oo — > a

d. 43 4

° o mocooocoo o ef o ° om o °

eee di cc th. a0. ses edd ks AO ee SER, O 16

ooo ot

CONN AO

er “oom

Moldgreen. Mount Pleasant. Oakes. Paddock. Spring Grove. Stile Common. Totals,

mococoocoocoo a4

1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 I 1883

School Year ............ 12 12 12 12 12 12 11 12 12 12 12 12 Average Attendance ..............§ 8306 301 358 378 222 2292 122 163 826 382 219 218 2682 2763 Grant for :— 2 A d. d 42-8. nh Oa. oe oh Average Attendance ..............4 91 16 #107 8 O 83 11° I 48 18 801 1 0} 858 6

wa a sn oR ro we oR rd aR a a

d. ; Standard Examination ............4 52 0. No Standard 1.| 82 16 408 18 0| 455 4 EE, PR, 8 U1 ae 5 7516 8 89 5

MBsoocco ° oD 3 o a o ° ° > oO ° ° pest oo So ra

I ie ncn © 239 18 252 12 017210 174 2105 19 10/2199 15 Proportionate Grant for 12 months [251 6 239 18 73 16 O \296 14 ca ee oe 914 22 18

as ee. Reena ene 015113] 015 3821 015 834 016 34' 016

a re for] ° © pa ° = ° ° 1x ; oO co re © as 1 ° < co ri S SS ri rr 6

20 257 20 |25212 0717210 O 174 O [2113 10 0/2199 15 20 oe in cho 110 0] 251 8 0} 86 5 10:05 230 O22 ce oe ee es 15 233 015 9) 015113] 015 9 01511

et os ee, co te

Der +4... .3.. 16

me cena =

* Examined under the New Code; amounts not given separately. + Standard II was retained this year in the Infants’ Department. } The largeness of this increase due to the transfer of the children from Spring Street School. || The first Grant for this Department.

Page 29

TABLE I.—Continued.

Comparison of Grants for the Years 1882 and 1883.

SUMMARY.

Departments. Departments.

Mixed

. Departments. Upper Departments.

Infants’ Departments.

Totals for All Departments.

1882

1882

1883

1882 1883

Average Attendance.. Grant for :— Average Attendance. . Infants Presented .. Standard Examination Class Examination .. Specific Subjects... Pupil Teachers és Total Grant ..

Increase hap os Decrease ee ci Grant per head

SD a

oo°o°ooo

Proportionate Grant for 12 months

@

rit ca

1142 di -£ s. d.

11 I 412 13 8 O I 224 16 4 O} 23 100 O} 25 168

0 41024 12 41038 7 O07 231 1 1

2682 eo &. 337 15 6

DHSDNSOOH TE

015 9

1 0) 858

6 ‘820 4 197.0 @ 408 4

18 0) 455

ee ee

16. 8 88 5 19 10/2199 15 10 0\2199 15 0!6034 8 0} 86 5 Of 715

2763 S Bw

164 1 6013

0 15 11

wn a

re for co @ TONDHOHOCO

017

COKH Om x

Page 30

TABLE II.

Comparison of Passes at Government Examinations.

BOYS’

DEPARTMENTS.

Beaumont

Berry Brow.

Street.

Hillhouse.

Moldgreen.

Mount Pleasant.

Oakes.

Stile Common.

Totals.

Average Attendance.......... Qualified for Examination... Presented ,, i Passes in Reading........... cg <a WE 5 oe 4 os ae Arithmetic Percentage of Passes ....... Half-Timers presented ..... Passes in Specific Subjects :— English Literature....... PUM kl oes Animal Physiology..... Physical Geography ... Mathematics 6.5 6 soa

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

I 255 .| 249 -| 239 -| 232 .| 223 -| 226 -| 681 95 a 30

I = 44

-| 46

261 252 246 236 231 225 692 93°8

157 155 144 137 117 133 387 89°6 6

22

154 162 151 146 143

434 95°8 3

31

10

146 154 145 123 115 116 354 81:4

181 182 173 160 143 154 457 88

276 282 275 238 230 248 716 86°8 31

30

280 298 286 272 260 250 782 91-1 23

2 5 21

5

304 317 300 273 262 272 807 89°7 30

307 320 311 284 272 268 824 88°3 26

248 267 259 241 237 208 686 88°3

265 287 279 244 241 242 727 86°9

201 213 202 165 159 151 475 20

189 199 190 170 162 157 489 85°8 11

24

I

1587 1637 1564 1409 1343 1354 4106 87°5 136

163 46 29

22

1637 1700 1636 1512 1452 1441 4405 89°8 100

124 14 62 10 5 12

GIRLS’

DEPARTMENTS.

Beaumont Street.

Berry Brow.

Hillhouse.

Moldgreen.

Mount Pleasant.

Oakes.

Stile Common.

Totals.

Average Attendance......... Qualified for Examination... Presented ,, = cee Passes in Reading........... i WE bois ork cts fe Arithmetic Total Passes Percentage of Passes ....... Half-timers Presented....... Passes in Specific Subjects :— English Literature....... Domestic Economy.......

1882

1883

1882.

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

.| 240 242 .| 236 eae 6°91 I 209 -| 617 a O01 ; 16

am ad ‘ 27

230 220 201 177 186 177 540 89°6 7

27 27

155 153 144 132 122 117 371 85°9 6

155 167 160 142 129 131 402 83°7 12

138 142 134 123 113 119 355 88°3 1

174 180 175 168 168 167 503 95°8 6

39

260 264 252 241 214 240 695 91°9 24

49 38

246 268 251 242 236 232 710 94°3 19

35 35

287 312 289 256 258 243 757 87°3 26

38 36

266 273 253 233 223 218 674 88°8 15

24 37

234 256 247 237 227 226 690 93°1 18

42

240 260 247 231 209 208 648 87°4 17

39

174

181.

179 156 161 151 468 87°2 13

36

181 197 187 177 177 162 516 92 12

8 22

1488 1550 1481 1362 1286 1305 3953 89 104

104 186

1492 1565 1474 1370 1328 1295 3993 90°3 88

98 199

Page 31

TABLE Comparison of Passes at Government Examinations.

MIXED DEPARTMENTS.

Almondbury. ea Deighton. I Paddock. [Spring Grove Totals.

1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 }| 1882 I 1883

Average Attendance......J 161 I 154] 290] 284 158 I 193 |} 173] 498 I 525 I 1142 I 1294 Qualified for Examination] 157 I 169] 301) 290 159 I 200; 176] 502 I 533 I 1160 I 1327 Presented ‘i 149 I 158] 287); 281] This| 153] 190 I 171] 476! 520] 1102 I 1283 Passes in Reading........J 140 I 145] 275 I 247] De- 131 I 160 I 160] 442; 468] 1017 1151 a Writing ........] 189 I 127] 262 I 112] 140] 870| 441] 924] 1052 he Arithmetic 136 I 138] 246 I 225 ]|ment] 105] 150/ 155] 386| 456] 918] 1079 Total Passes ............, 415 I 410] 783 I 704] was I 348] 463 I 455 I 1198 I 1365 I 2859 I 3282 Percentage of Passes 92°38 I 86:5 I 90:9 I 83:5 I not I 75-8] 81:2 I 88:7 I 83.9 I 87-6] 86:5 I 85:3 Half-Timers Presented .. 2 8 24 23 jopen’d 4 22 11 32 28 80 76 Passesin Specific Subjects: until English Literature.... TOE ss és 17 I Feb-|- .. es 14 36 22 46 53 Animal Physiology....] .. a 8 jruary,| .. = es as Physical Geography ..| .. ‘i Yo Pee es ie 19 20 26 20 Mathematics ........] .. SE i wt Ks es a os 2 Domestic Economy ..} 12 3 12 7 os és 24 19 48 29

Page 32

TABLE Il.—Continued. Comparison of Passes at Government Examinations.

INFANTS’ DEPARTMENTS.

Almondbury. a Berry Brow. ge me I oe Deighton. I Hillhouse. Lindley.

1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883

Average Attendance.........+......) 75 69 I 221} 2337 118 I 121 82 I 103] 154| 162] 145| 126] 286) 230 98 I 105 Qualified for Standards Examination} 24 34 73 68 Filrst 13 45 49 48 76 32 81 83 18 40 Presented is is 19 29 70 66 I Stanidard 13 45 46 46 71 29 76 78 18 40 I TAOAGINE 6 63 i os keh cineca 12 24 66 58 niot 13 44 46 45 66 29 68 72 18 40 PRUE 6G seid Ae 27 67 66 I retajined. 13 43 46 46 65 28 74 74 18 39 me <4 a 26 62 62 13 44 44 41 62 27 66 74 18 38 PURGE ii 77} 186. 39 I 131] 132] 1938 84} 208 I 220 54 I 117 Percentage of Passes 98.2 I 88°5 I 92°9 94 100 97 I 98.6 I 95:7 I 90°6 I 96°6 I 91-2 94] 100} Infants under Seven :— Qualified for Presentation ......] 46 65} 125| 1314 111) 109 61 57 92 |} 104 72 85 I 119 I 134 69 63 isin. a 65 } 123 I 130 4 111 {| 102 61 55 92 99 65 844 119} 131 64 62

Moldgreen. Oakes. Paddock. |Spring Grove} Totals.

1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883

Average 306 I 301] 358 I 3878] 222 I 222] 122; 163] 3826/| 332] 219! 218 I 2682 I 2763 Qualified for Standards Examination] 96. 96} 108; 113 83 78 I First 57 97 I 120 70 72 I 788 I 886 Presented ,, 92 91} 100; 108 81 74 |Stand-| 55 87 I 108 69 69 I 742 I 838 FURIES TE BOR 4 6 88 93 I 104 67 67 I ard 55 82 96 68 67 I 696 I 789 ME ii 8 91 97 I 102 70 73 I not 55 77 |} 100 69 68 I 704 I 812 a 88 86 87 I 103 74 66 re- 54 78 94 67 65 I 672 I 780 Total Passes see 262 I 265.) 277.) BOO) 211 I 206 237 I 290] 2041 900 1 90721 23981 Percentage of Passes 94°9 I 97-1 ] 92°3 I 95°4 I 86°8 I 92°87 .. 99°4 I 90°8 I 89°5 I 98°6 I 96°6 I 93:1 I 94-7 Infants under Seven :— Qualified for Presentation..... 196 I 179] 219 I 227] 126] 1384] 103; 102] 213! 186 4 127! 129 I 1679 I 1705 6.0.6. 198 I 174] 214] 195 I 1847 108 I 100] 209] 178 S88) 196 1 1649 I 1661

Page 33

TABLE II.—Continued. Comparison of Passes at Government Examinations.

SUMMARY.

Totals for all Departments.

Infants’ Departments.

Girls’ Departments.

Mixed Departments.

Totals for Upper

Boys’ Departments.

Departments.

Average Attendance............ Qualified for Standards Exams... Presented Passes in ‘i WN ao chi ve ‘i conan TOON Sick ei is gs kc Half-Timers Presented ........ Per cent. of Passes in Reading .. Writing .. és 4 Arithmetic Total Percentage of Passes .... Passes in Specific Subjects :— English Literature.......... OME Sig eee cc Animal Physiology.......... Physical Geography ........ Mathematics PRONE Domestic Econonty ........ Infants under Seven :— Qualified for Presentation.... «+0 04:00 6800

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1587 1637 1564 1409 1343 1354 4106 136 90°1 85°9 86:6 87°5

163 “46 29

22

1637 1700 1636 1512 1452 1441 4405 100 92:4 88°8 88 89°8

124 14 62 10 5 12

1488 1550 1481 1362 1286 1305 3953 104 92 86°8 88:1 89

104

1492 1565 1474 1370 1328 1295 3993

1142 1160 1102 1017 924 918 2859 80 92°3 83°8 83:3 86°5

46

"96

48

1294 1327 1283 1151 1052 1079 3282 76 89°7 82 84-1 85:3

53 + g 20 2

29

4217 4347 4147 3788 3553 3577 10918 320 85:7 86:3 87°8

313 46 BB "99 934

4423 4592 4393 4033 3832 3815 11680 264 91:8 87°2 86°8 88°6

2682 788 742 696 704 672 2072 93°8 94°9 90°6 93:1

2763 886 838 789 812 780 2381 94:2 96°9 93

94:7

6899 5135 4889 4484 4257 4249 12990 320 91°7 87°71 86°9 88°6

313 46 BB "99 234

1679 1649

7186 5478 5231 4822 4644 4595 14061 264 92.2 88°8 87°8 89°6

275 14 70 30 7 12 228

1705 1661

Page 34

TABLE II.

Drawing Examinations in connexion with the Science and Art Department, South Kensington.

BOYS’

DEPARTMENTS.

Beaumont Street.

Berry Brow.

Hillhouse.

Moldgreen.

Mount Pleasant.

Oakes.

Stile Common.

Totals.

No. marked

9 99

Total No. of

eee et

No.Or i. oc ic occ

Average Attendance........ No. of Papers Examined....

1882 I 1883

1882 I 1883

1882

1883

1882 I 1883

1882 I 1883

1882 I 1883

1882 I 1883

1882

1883

255 I 261 115 I 142 1 7 20 25 75 77 96 I 109 "19 33

157 I 154 92 I 106

181 102

276 I 280 156 I 155 5 1 20 22 47 70 72 93 84 62

304 I 307 199 I 178 5 11 22 48 126 98 153 I 157 46 21

248 I 265 95 I 116

25 35 40 62 74 I 105 21 11

201 I 189 131 I 136 7 5 26 21 53 81 86 I 107 45 29

1587 865 47 153 421 621 244

1637 935 48 202 515 765 170

GIRLS’

DEPARTMENTS.

Beaumont Street.

Berry Brow.

Hillhouse.

Moldgreen.

Mount Pleasant.

Oakes.

Stile Common.

Totals.

99 99

Total No. of

Average Attendance...... No. of Papers Examined No. marked ‘‘ Excellent ” OF

No.-of -Failares: is

1882 I 1883

1882 I 1883

1882

1883

1882 I 1883

1882 I 1883

1882 I 1883

1882 I 1883

1882

1883

240 I 230 104 I 102 1 6 3 22 82 64 86 92 18 10

155 I 155 60; 41 2 3 4 14 121 ° 93 40 42 1

138 80 8 56 68 12

174 107

260 I 246 61 73 2 ve 5 4 30 51 37 55 24 18

287 I 266 127 98 se 1 7 17 78 79 85 97 42 1

234 I 240 84 I 113 5 és 11 13 42 68 58 81 26 32

174 I 181 80 69 od 2 8 5 25 46 33 53 47 16

1488

596 14 46 325 385 211

1492 603 17 105 398 500 103

Page 35

TABLE IU 1.— Continued.

MIXED DEPARTMENTS.

Almondbury. } Crosland Moor. Deighton. Paddock. Spring Grove. Totals.

1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883

Average Attendance........ 161 154 290 284 This 158 193 173 498 525 1142 1294 No. of Papers Examined... 104 104* 221 199 I Depart- 141 73 98 311 204 709 746 No. marked ‘‘ Excellent” .. 2 2 13 6 ment os 2 16 6 31 16 ce CES. ees 13 13 41 31 not 4 1 25 41 67 96 140 a ie 22 3 ce 55 55 93 132 I opened 81 25 57 185 106 358 431 Total No. of Passes ........ 70 70 147 169 until 85 26 84 242 179 485 587 No:. of Failures. «ois 0.00 34 34 74 30 56 47 14 69 25 224 159

99

SUMMARY.

Boys’ Girls’ Mixed Totals for all Departments. Departments. I Departments.

1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883

Average Attendance...... 1587 1637 1488 1492 1142 1294 4217 4423 No. of Papers 865 935 596 603 709 746 2170 2284 marked ‘‘ Excellent” .. 47 48 14 17 31 16 92 81 os ae OO nck is 153 202 46 105 96 140 295 447 i en So) 515 325. 398 358 431 1104 1344 Total No. of 621 765 385 500 485 587 1491 1852 ee ag a re 244 170 211 103 224 159 679 432

* The Drawing Report for the Almondbury School had not come at the time of printing this report ; the School is therefore credited with the same number of passes as last year, in order to complete the table.

Page 36

TABLE IV. Prizes for Regular and Punctual Attendance.

BOYS’ DEPARTMENTS.

Beaumont

Mount Street.

Berry Brow. Pleasant.

Hillhouse. I Moldgreen.

Oakes.

Stile Common.

Totals.

1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882 I 1883

Average No. on Books.............. Average Percentage of Attendance to the No. OU vie i cs mo. Of Special Prises ous 6.0. os ee ke SOOM os OF co

316 255

306 261

178 157

88°2 27 104 £ 8s. d.

172 154

167 146

201 181

356 276

717°5 24 127 I 146] 153) 137

£ s. dj/£ s. dif 8. 8. d. 9 2 410 6 213171015 01078 1 81512 4

. Gee 276, Git: Qian Gi 6. & 1 2371 1/1 OFF O 94,010]71 O07] O 10}

354 280

359 304

362 307

84:8 36

80:7 39 140 141 £ s. d. gs. d, 1616 816 8 12 8 10 21 & Cee, = 1 1 O23] 1 43

85:3 28

87°5 21 78 89 S & @s 6. &

90 23

79°1 25

84°7 39

Amount earned in Prizes

Amount per head on the No. on Books

£s. d. 18 3-9

305 _ 248

81:3 26 121

a & 10}

s.

317 265

83°6 23 140

£ 8. d. 1418 2

0 il

236 201

85°2 30 101

-— & 12 12

ak & L 03

217 189

11 4 096 2 6

1917 1587

1929 1637

82:7 206 824 a; 4,

84°9 185 842 £ 8s. d. 94 410 a. a. 0-114

ig. se

GIRLS’ DEPARTMENTS.

Beaumont

Mount Street.

Hillhouse. Pleasant.

Berry Brow. Moldgreen.

Oakes.

Stile Common.

Totals.

1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883 I 1882 I 1883

1882

1883

1882 I 1883

1882 I 1883

Average No. on Average Percentage of Attendance to the No. ee Oe ee No. of Special Prizes ........... WO TE GE ES oe

306 240

300 230

187 155

174 138

207 174

336 260

320 246

370 287

345 266

78°4 16 100 £ 8s. d.

81:2 20 76 £s. dH£ s. d.

79°3 12 61

84-1 15

77-4

21 81 78 £ 8s. d.

77°6 23 125 £ 8s. d.

£s. df£ s. d.

Amount earned in Prizes 10 8 4

a, Amount per head on the No. on ate 8

10 110}11 4 2 Gdeth & 8}1 24

819 86 8 2 i ae a 113,0 8}

817 449 110 ‘i 2

0 10}

13 6 8 dis. d. 8

2

£ 11 10

s.

296 240

811 110

0 9}

215 174

227 181

79°7 21 78

80°9 l 18 74 aif s. d. 64811 4 asa. 4.

0 9%

8.

£s,d.

1882 1488

1886 1492

79°1 134 637 611 £s. di£ s. d.

79:1 138

95 3 d.j s. 9310 83

0 5 66816 10 d.| s. d.

Page 37

TABLE IV.—Continued.

Prizes for Regular and Punctual Attendance.

INFANTS’

DEPARTMENTS.

Almondbury.

Beaumont Street.

Berry Brow.

Brierley Wood.

Crosland Moor.

Deighton.

Hillhouse.

Lindley.

1882 1883

1882 1883

1882 I 1883

1882

1883

1882 I 1883

1882 I 1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

103 75

Average No. on: Books........ 105 Average Attendance..........: 70 Percentage of Attendance to the No. on Books..........] 72°8 66-7 No. of Special Prizes ........ 4 5 Total No. of Prizes 35 25 Amount earned in Prizes 1/18/5 Amount per head on the No. on Books 43d. 43d.

eeeeeoeeoeeeeeeeee

321 238

318 226

71 =| 741 9 I 14 110 I 98 5/12/65

4d. 4d.

5/13/7

166 126

154 122

79-2 I 75:9 10 x 70 I 62 3/8/5

bid. I 4d.

2/17/4

108 84

77°8 9 56

2/19/3

64d.

133 105 78°9 15

75 5/13/0

* 10d.

194 156

204 163

80-4 I 799 10 9 98 I 91 5/10/5 4/14/6

63d. I 54d.

161 127

189 147

77:8 I 78-9 5 3 64 I 59 3/17/6| 2/15/2

4d.

I

317 236

74:4 12 92 4/2/4

3d.

312 233

74:7 14 98 5/18/8

Aad.

132 98

74:2 5 34

1/15/9

31d.

123 105 85°4 10

50 3/7/11

64d.

Moldgreen.

Mount Pleasant.

Oakes.

Paddock.

Spring Grove

Stile Common.

Totals.

1882 I 1883

1882 1883

1882 I 1883

1882

1883

1882 I 1883

1882 I 1883

1882

1883

394 308

395 302

Average No. on Books........ Average Attendance.......... Percentage of Attendance to the Books ........ No. of Special Prizes ........ INO. OF Amount earned in Prizes .... Amount per head on the No. on Books

78-2 27 169 £10/16/6

63d.

76°5 26 150

54d.

9/5/11 I 10/4/0

467 362

509 383

7T7°5 17 164

75°2 24 164

sd. I 44d.

9/18/4

296 223

303 223

73°6 3 95

15°3 70

2/18/7|4/13/10

24d. I 34d.

162 122

73°3 2 45

1/17/2

22d.

203 163

80:3 8

69 3/17/1 4hd.

463 329

493 336

711 I 68-2 3 8 82 I 93 4/1/1 4/18/11

Qa. I 244,

306 220

321 220

71:9 I 68:5 14 7 90 I 71 5/12/10 4/6/6

44d. I 3d.

3603 2708

75-2 127 1179 64/14/1

44d.

3749 2794

74:5 154 1200 69/19/2

44d.

* Standard II was retained this year.

The Prizes of the Standard Children are twice the value of those for Infants.

Page 38

TABLE IV.-—Continued.

Prizes for Regular and Punctual Attendance.

MIXED DEPARTMENTS.

Almondburv. I Crosland Moor.

Deighton.

Paddock.

Spring Grove.

Totals.

1882 1883 1882 1883

1882 1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

184 154 83:7 19 74 8/5/10 1034.

334 284 85 47 166 19/19/4 1/24

193 161 83-4 23 81 £9/10/4 113d.

345 290 84:1 37 145 16/14/0 114d.

es On SR Mh oo os in cee Percentage of Attendance to the No. on Bee BOLL. Oe Bree rer ree an BE RO os 5 eos Ses earned in 2. o.oo eS: Amount per head on the No. on Books. ........

February

184 158 85:9 15 70 7/6/0 94d.

This Depart- ment not opened until

1882

273 193 70°7 4

53 4/12/10 4d.

217 173 79°7 10 94 7/9/8 84d.

635 498 76°9 32 169 17/19/6 634.

647 525 81-1 36 209 21/8/10 73d.

1446 1142 79 96 448 48/16/8 8d.

1566 1294 82-6 127 613 64/19/8 93d.

SUMMARY.

Girls’ Departments.

Boys’ Departments.

Mixed Departments.

Totals for Upper Departments.

Infants’ Departments.

Totals for all Departments.

1882 1883 1882 1883

1882 1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1882

1883

1889 1488 791 134 637 70/5/6 83d.

1886 1492 79:1 138 611 68/16/10 83d.

1929 1637 84-9 185 842 94/4/1 114d.

1917 1587 82:7 206 824 £96/2/6 1/0

pects, Bio EEE ES Ce Se NY NI a. ns ose eee hones cs Percentage of Attendance to the No. on Books.. is ooo os ccc nee a cdc Amount 7earned in Prizes Amount per head on the No. on Books ........

1446 1142 79 96 448 48/16/8 8d.

1566 1294 82:6 127 613 64/19/8 93d,

5245 4217 80-4 436 1909 211/4/8 gad.

5381 4493 82-2 450 2066 227/11]4 10d.

3603 2708 75-2 127 1179 64/14/1 44d.

3749 2794 74:5 154 1200 69/19/2 43d.

8848 6925 78:3 563 3088 275/18/9 74d.

9130 7217 79 604 3266 297/10/6 74.

Page 39

TABLE V. Income per Scholar in Average Attendance.

Almondbury. Beaumont Street. Berry Brow. Brierley Wood. Crosland Moor. Deighton. Hillhouse. Lindley.

1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883

Average Attendance ...... 236 223 716 724 430 430 82 103

6S sH =H s s s

145 284 520 585 98 105 44 @€i24 6 2352 6 4&4i12 «4: 442: 017 037016 43 010 8810 9 016 9210 14 113 63

3 a Js) wa oR 3 w a es

NE dhs aie School Pence ............] 10 934} 10 104 EE wns A. see Other Sources ............,0 2 22/0 2 43

Sree rN oD ~ ra So ~ ~ re So mr are

ri wo oD

ol Hey

ie o> @ rm Oo tole Nn wD rei oS tole tole iit

oy 12 ra ° nin ~ CCOHOIN Roooo|n vole oS tC ° IE

is re = nN rile So ri st nN tol N

2 8 I 1 18 10}

uw N mis @

0 43

Moldgreen. Mount Pleasant. Oakes. Paddock. Spring Grove. Stile Common. Totals.

1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 1883 1882 I 1883

Average Attendance ...... 842 827 949 951 704 727 815 336 824 857 594 588 6899 7185 I So 6 hie 6. 36% 016 22 734017 22/0 011 63]0 9 32;010 124011 53/0 2

Ss wo a i} sn a a 3 a cs} sn a i}

NT eV wes NN as ee ae ee OGher Sources

rots N @ ri Oo mil RAONDO rt = Roe rt Oo ein “uw Cc re So en oO @ ri oS TS tlt ris

rm

ae

0 9 831110 62/1 2 6 53 0013/00 2

1/119 92}216 23|210 43

tole Oo So mit WOO rt re ri

oo I a rile tole Lo Ho oo miles Oe ao oo —— oo I o ROoooina

2 73470 010 22472 8 8/2 8 11%

oO

Page 40

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